Sarvaroga, Sarva-roga: 9 definitions

Introduction:

Sarvaroga means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Ayurveda (science of life)

[«previous next»] — Sarvaroga in Ayurveda glossary
Source: archive.org: Vagbhata’s Ashtanga Hridaya Samhita (first 5 chapters)

Sarvaroga (सर्वरोग) refers to “all possible diseases”, mentioned in verse 4.23 of the Aṣṭāṅgahṛdayasaṃhitā (Sūtrasthāna) by Vāgbhaṭa.—Accordingly, “[...] all possible diseases [viz., sarvaroga: rogāḥ sarve’pi] are caused by provocation and suppression of the natural urges. A cure (has been) given (only) for those which (occur) most frequently among them”.

Source: Research Gate: Internal applications of Vatsanabha (Aconitum ferox wall)

Sarvaroga (सर्वरोग) refers to “all disease”. Medicinal formulations in the management of this condition include 37 references of Vatsanābha usages. Guṭikā is maximum (30) dosage form in the management of Sarvaroga. Vatsanābha (Aconitum ferox), although categorized as sthāvara-viṣa (vegetable poisons), has been extensively used in ayurvedic pharmacopoeia.

Source: Asian Agri-History: Paśu Āyurvēda (Veterinary Medicine) in Garuḍapurāṇa

Sarvaroga (सर्वरोग) refers to particular afflictions, according to sections on Horses (Gajāyurveda or Aśvāyurveda) in the Garuḍapurāṇa.—[Dūrvā-kalpa for the management of sarvaroga]—In the management of sarvaroga just like vardhamāna pippalī-kalpa, Dūrvā (Cynodon dactylon) is advised to take in increasing doses. The details are as follows:—One Karṣa dūrvā should be given to a horse on the first day, and the dose should be increased by a Karṣa measure, each day, till the dose reaches five Pala. During this treatment Eighty Pala pāna (drinks) or bhojana (diet) is considered as para/uttama (best/maximum), Sixty Pala is the madhyama (average) and forty Pala is the adhama (lowest/ minimum).

Ayurveda book cover
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Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

[«previous next»] — Sarvaroga in Shaktism glossary
Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

Sarvaroga (सर्वरोग) refers to “all diseases”, representing one of the weapons (attributes) of Goddess Kubjikā, according to the Manthānabhairavatantra, a vast sprawling work that belongs to a corpus of Tantric texts concerned with the worship of the goddess Kubjikā.—Accordingly, “(Now) I will tell (you about) the great weapons of that (goddess) Kubjikā. [...] (One) attains (ultimate) reality by means of the trident and Māyā is destroyed by means of the wheel. All diseases are destroyed [i.e., sarvaroga-nāśa] by the thunderbolt while the goad is considered to be (the means to attract and) control. The enemy is destroyed by the arrow. The dagger is the avoidance of obstacles. Wealth (lakṣmī) is acquired by means of the severed head and the eight yogic powers by the ascetic’s staff”.

Shaktism book cover
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Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

[«previous next»] — Sarvaroga in Shaivism glossary
Source: SOAS University of London: Protective Rites in the Netra Tantra

Sarvaroga (सर्वरोग) refers to “all sickness”, according to the Netratantra of Kṣemarāja: a Śaiva text from the 9th century in which Śiva (Bhairava) teaches Pārvatī topics such as metaphysics, cosmology, and soteriology.—Accordingly, [verse 6.23-25a]—“Delighted, [the Mantrin] should visualize [the jīva] in his own or someone else’s [body] as being flooded by waves of Amṛta (amṛtormi), in the middle of a lotus on the ocean of milk, enclosed between two moons one above and one below, enclosed by the syllables saḥ, etc. He [visualizes his] body, beautiful inside and out, filled with nectar. [He is] freed without exertion and without trouble, and liberated from any sickness (sarvaroga)”.

Shaivism book cover
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Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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In Buddhism

Tibetan Buddhism (Vajrayana or tantric Buddhism)

Source: OSU Press: Cakrasamvara Samadhi

Sarvaroga (सर्वरोग) refers to “all disease”, according to the Guru Mandala Worship (maṇḍalārcana) ritual often performed in combination with the Cakrasaṃvara Samādhi, which refers to the primary pūjā and sādhanā practice of Newah Mahāyāna-Vajrayāna Buddhists in Nepal.—Accordingly, “Becoming a golden color, liberated from all disease (sarvarogasarvarogair vimuktaḥ), Best among gods and men, a bright beautiful moon, Accomplishes the golden prize, born in a royal lineage, In the highest Buddha abode, the one who makes the Mandala”.

Tibetan Buddhism book cover
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Tibetan Buddhism includes schools such as Nyingma, Kadampa, Kagyu and Gelug. Their primary canon of literature is divided in two broad categories: The Kangyur, which consists of Buddha’s words, and the Tengyur, which includes commentaries from various sources. Esotericism and tantra techniques (vajrayāna) are collected indepently.

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Mahayana (major branch of Buddhism)

[«previous next»] — Sarvaroga in Mahayana glossary
Source: De Gruyter: A Buddhist Ritual Manual on Agriculture

Sarvaroga (सर्वरोग) refers to “all types of illnesses”, according to the Vajratuṇḍasamayakalparāja, an ancient Buddhist ritual manual on agriculture from the 5th-century (or earlier), containing various instructions for the Sangha to provide agriculture-related services to laypeople including rain-making, weather control and crop protection.—Accordingly, [as the Bhagavān said to the great Nāga kings]: “Now I will teach the auspicious offering manual which can bring about any effect. [...] There will be a closing of the boundaries all around for a hundred yojanas. All diseases, all illnesses (sarvaroga), all the evil-minded, all rivals and adversaries: these do not prevail. [...]”.

Mahayana book cover
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Mahayana (महायान, mahāyāna) is a major branch of Buddhism focusing on the path of a Bodhisattva (spiritual aspirants/ enlightened beings). Extant literature is vast and primarely composed in the Sanskrit language. There are many sūtras of which some of the earliest are the various Prajñāpāramitā sūtras.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

[«previous next»] — Sarvaroga in Sanskrit glossary
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Sarvaroga (सर्वरोग):—[=sarva-roga] [from sarva] ([in the beginning of a compound]) all kinds of diseases, [Catalogue(s)]

[Sanskrit to German]

Sarvaroga in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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