Sarvapapa, Sarvapāpa, Sarva-papa: 2 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Sarvapapa means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous next»] — Sarvapapa in Purana glossary
Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Sarvapāpa (सर्वपाप) refers to that which is “all sins” (e.g.,  sarvapāpahara—that which is destructive of all sins), according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.3.1.—Accordingly, as Brahmā narrated to Nārada:—“[...] O foremost of sages, listen to the story of Śivā which is excellent, sanctifying, highly divine, auspicious and destructive of all sins (i.e., sarvapāpa-hara). When the great goddess Satī, the daughter of Dakṣa, was sporting about on the Himālayas with Śiva, Menā, the beloved of Himācala thought that she was her own daughter and loved her like a mother with all kinds of nourishments”.

Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

Discover the meaning of sarvapapa in the context of Purana from relevant books on Exotic India

Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

[«previous next»] — Sarvapapa in Shaktism glossary
Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

Sarvapāpa (सर्वपाप) refers to “all sins” (e.g., “one that is free from all sins”), according to the second recension of the Yogakhaṇḍa of the Manthānabhairavatantra, a vast sprawling work that belongs to a corpus of Tantric texts concerned with the worship of the goddess Kubjikā.—Accordingly, “The purified soul who, pure, recites this [i.e., Śrīkaṇṭha’s hymn in praise of the Goddess] in front of the Kramaliṅga is free from all sins [i.e., sarvapāpa] and attains Rudra’s world. It was uttered by Śrīkaṇṭha and, secret, it should not be told to (just) anybody. It should be given to a true devotee, (and) never to one who is averse (to the goddess). [...]”.

Shaktism book cover
context information

Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

Discover the meaning of sarvapapa in the context of Shaktism from relevant books on Exotic India

See also (Relevant definitions)

Relevant text

Like what you read? Consider supporting this website: