Sarvapapa, Sarvapāpa, Sarva-papa: 5 definitions

Introduction:

Sarvapapa means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous next»] — Sarvapapa in Purana glossary
Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Sarvapāpa (सर्वपाप) refers to that which is “all sins” (e.g.,  sarvapāpahara—that which is destructive of all sins), according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.3.1.—Accordingly, as Brahmā narrated to Nārada:—“[...] O foremost of sages, listen to the story of Śivā which is excellent, sanctifying, highly divine, auspicious and destructive of all sins (i.e., sarvapāpa-hara). When the great goddess Satī, the daughter of Dakṣa, was sporting about on the Himālayas with Śiva, Menā, the beloved of Himācala thought that she was her own daughter and loved her like a mother with all kinds of nourishments”.

Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

[«previous next»] — Sarvapapa in Shaktism glossary
Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

Sarvapāpa (सर्वपाप) refers to “all sins” (e.g., “one that is free from all sins”), according to the second recension of the Yogakhaṇḍa of the Manthānabhairavatantra, a vast sprawling work that belongs to a corpus of Tantric texts concerned with the worship of the goddess Kubjikā.—Accordingly, “The purified soul who, pure, recites this [i.e., Śrīkaṇṭha’s hymn in praise of the Goddess] in front of the Kramaliṅga is free from all sins [i.e., sarvapāpa] and attains Rudra’s world. It was uttered by Śrīkaṇṭha and, secret, it should not be told to (just) anybody. It should be given to a true devotee, (and) never to one who is averse (to the goddess). [...]”.

Shaktism book cover
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Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

[«previous next»] — Sarvapapa in Shaivism glossary
Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions

Sarvapāpa (सर्वपाप) or Sarvapāpāpanoda refers to the “expiation of all sins” [?], according to the Siddhayogeśvarīmata chapter 10.—Accordingly, “[Bhairava spoke]:—First [before any other practice to attain a specific supernatural power], for all kinds of supernatural powers, [and] for expiatory purposes (sarvapāpa-apanoda-artha), one has to start the observance of the [ancillary] mantras, which destroys all obstacles. The male or female practitioner, with his/her mind focused on the mantra, should perform worship according to prescriptions and then undertake the vow. [...]”.

Shaivism book cover
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Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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In Buddhism

Mahayana (major branch of Buddhism)

[«previous next»] — Sarvapapa in Mahayana glossary
Source: academia.edu: A Study and Translation of the Gaganagañjaparipṛcchā

Sarvapāpa (सर्वपाप) refers to “any evil deed”, according to the Gaganagañjaparipṛcchā: the eighth chapter of the Mahāsaṃnipāta (a collection of Mahāyāna Buddhist Sūtras).—Accordingly, as Gaganagañja said to Ratnapāṇi: “Son of good family, those sixty-four dharmas are included in one hundred twenty-eight dharmas. What are those one hundred twenty-four? [...] (17) protecting oneself is included in not performing any evil deed (sarvapāpa) and accumulating all merits; (18) protecting others is included in tolerance and gentleness; (19) the absence of distinction is included in the space-like thoughts and the wind-like thoughts; (20) a single taste is included in suchness and the absolute truth; [...]’”.

Mahayana book cover
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Mahayana (महायान, mahāyāna) is a major branch of Buddhism focusing on the path of a Bodhisattva (spiritual aspirants/ enlightened beings). Extant literature is vast and primarely composed in the Sanskrit language. There are many sūtras of which some of the earliest are the various Prajñāpāramitā sūtras.

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Tibetan Buddhism (Vajrayana or tantric Buddhism)

Source: OSU Press: Cakrasamvara Samadhi

Sarvapāpa (सर्वपाप) refers to “all sins”, according to the Sūryārgha (sun offering) ritual often performed in combination with the Cakrasaṃvara Samādhi, which refers to the primary pūjā and sādhanā practice of Newah Mahāyāna-Vajrayāna Buddhists in Nepal.—Accordingly, “[...] [Make patron put a ṭīkā red mark on the ritual lamp.] To Śrī Sūrya, red sandalwood, homage. [Make patron offer a red flower to the ritual lamp.] To Śrī Sūrya, a red flower, homage. [Make patron put a sacred thread on the ritual lamp.] To Śrī Sūrya, a red sacred thread, homage. [Make patron hold rice and pray.] Oṃ homage to Śrī Sūrya the divine. Appearing as the Mantra flower, An ancient sage, whose great rays spread like a crown, Remover of all sins and obstacles [e.g., sarvapāpa], I bow to the maker of day”.

Tibetan Buddhism book cover
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Tibetan Buddhism includes schools such as Nyingma, Kadampa, Kagyu and Gelug. Their primary canon of literature is divided in two broad categories: The Kangyur, which consists of Buddha’s words, and the Tengyur, which includes commentaries from various sources. Esotericism and tantra techniques (vajrayāna) are collected indepently.

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