Sarvadharma, Sarva-dharma: 5 definitions

Introduction:

Sarvadharma means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

[«previous next»] — Sarvadharma in Shaivism glossary
Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions

Sarvadharma (सर्वधर्म) refers to “(the purification of) all karma”, according to the Jayadrathayāmala, Ṣaṭka 1 verse 13.3–18::—Accordingly, “[...] The lokadharmadīkṣā is a Śaiva ritual [and therefore] proceeds contrary to established [practice] (i.e. the Brahmanical order), but also conforms to worldly religion. Either [the Ācārya] should purify all [karma] (sarvadharmasarvaṃ dharmam) or only not purify the dharma (i.e. the auspicious karma); [then the initiate] is dedicated to [the accumulation of] dharma through mundane observances, and having enjoyed this [dharma] he proceeds to liberation. [...]”.

Shaivism book cover
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Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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In Buddhism

Tibetan Buddhism (Vajrayana or tantric Buddhism)

Source: OSU Press: Cakrasamvara Samadhi

Sarvadharma (सर्वधर्म) refers to “all conditions”, according to the Guru Mandala Worship (maṇḍalārcana) ritual often performed in combination with the Cakrasaṃvara Samādhi, which refers to the primary pūjā and sādhanā practice of Newah Mahāyāna-Vajrayāna Buddhists in Nepal.—Accordingly, “Oṃ the natural state of all conditions is pure (svabhāvasvabhāvaśuddhāḥ sarvadharmāḥ), my natural state is pure, My natural spirit is the vajra knowledge of emptiness, observe emptiness”.

Tibetan Buddhism book cover
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Tibetan Buddhism includes schools such as Nyingma, Kadampa, Kagyu and Gelug. Their primary canon of literature is divided in two broad categories: The Kangyur, which consists of Buddha’s words, and the Tengyur, which includes commentaries from various sources. Esotericism and tantra techniques (vajrayāna) are collected indepently.

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Mahayana (major branch of Buddhism)

[«previous next»] — Sarvadharma in Mahayana glossary
Source: academia.edu: A Study and Translation of the Gaganagañjaparipṛcchā

Sarvadharma (सर्वधर्म) refers to “all dharmas”, according to the Gaganagañjaparipṛcchā: the eighth chapter of the Mahāsaṃnipāta (a collection of Mahāyāna Buddhist Sūtras).—Accordingly as The Lord said: “O Śāriputra, in the buddha-field of the Tathāgata Ekaratnavyūha, there is a Bodhisattva, the great being Gaganagañja who is resplendent by the splendor of merit (puṇya-tejas), [...] who is adorned with determination (adhyāśaya) because of gaining distinction (viśeṣa-gāmitā), is without any doubt about all dharmas (sarvadharma-niḥsaṃśaya) as adorned with practice (prayoga), is without high and low as adorned with great equanimity (mahopekṣa) [...]”.

Mahayana book cover
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Mahayana (महायान, mahāyāna) is a major branch of Buddhism focusing on the path of a Bodhisattva (spiritual aspirants/ enlightened beings). Extant literature is vast and primarely composed in the Sanskrit language. There are many sūtras of which some of the earliest are the various Prajñāpāramitā sūtras.

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General definition (in Buddhism)

[«previous next»] — Sarvadharma in Buddhism glossary
Source: Wisdom Library: Dharma-samgraha

Sarvadharma (सर्वधर्म) or sarvadharmaśūnyatā refers to “emptiness of all things” one of the “twenty emptinesses” (śūnyatā) as defined in the Dharma-saṃgraha (section 41). The Dharma-samgraha (Dharmasangraha) is an extensive glossary of Buddhist technical terms in Sanskrit (e.g., sarvadharma). The work is attributed to Nagarjuna who lived around the 2nd century A.D.

In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

[«previous next»] — Sarvadharma in Jainism glossary
Source: The University of Sydney: A study of the Twelve Reflections

Sarvadharma (सर्वधर्म) refers to the “entirety of the doctrine”, according to the 11th century Jñānārṇava, a treatise on Jain Yoga in roughly 2200 Sanskrit verses composed by Śubhacandra.—Accordingly, “[com.—Next he speaks about the entirety (sarvasvam) of the doctrine (dharmasya)]—That very same doctrine, which is devoted to the helpless, is a preceptor and a friend, and the doctrine is a master and a brother. It is a protector without a motive. This doctrine saves the three worlds [from] sinking into the pit of hell. Also, it confers happiness beyond the senses for corporeal [souls]”.

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Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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