Sarvadeva: 7 definitions

Introduction:

Sarvadeva means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Natyashastra (theatrics and dramaturgy)

Source: Wisdom Library: Nāṭya-śāstra

Sarvadeva (सर्वदेव) is a Sanskrit word referring to “all the gods”. Acording to the Nāṭyaśāstra 1.82-88, when Brahmā, Indra and all other gods went to inspect the playhouse (nāṭyamaṇḍapa) designed by Viśvakarmā, he assigned different deities for the protection of the playhouse itself, as well as for the objects relating to dramatic performance (prayoga).

As such, Brahmā assigned all the gods (sarvadeva) to the drum (bhāṇḍa). The protection of the playhouse was enacted because of the jealous Vighnas (malevolent spirits), who began to create terror for the actors.

Natyashastra book cover
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Natyashastra (नाट्यशास्त्र, nāṭyaśāstra) refers to both the ancient Indian tradition (śāstra) of performing arts, (nāṭya, e.g., theatrics, drama, dance, music), as well as the name of a Sanskrit work dealing with these subjects. It also teaches the rules for composing dramatic plays (nataka) and poetic works (kavya).

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous next»] — Sarvadeva in Purana glossary
Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Sarvadeva (सर्वदेव) refers to “all the gods”, according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.3.15 (“The penance and reign of Tārakāsura”).—Accordingly, as Brahmā narrated: “[...] Then the demon Tāraka, of great strength and exploit, endowed with a lofty mind, requested permission of his mother for performing penance. The permission having been secured, that demon possessing great power of illusion and capable of deluding even experts in the magical art, thought of performing penance in order to conquer all the gods [i.e., sarvadeva-jaya]. Strictly adhering to the directions of his elders and preceptors he went to the forest of Madhu and performed a severe penance duly, having Brahmā as his objective. [...]”.

Source: JatLand: List of Mahabharata people and places

Sarvadeva (सर्वदेव) refers to the name of a Tīrtha (pilgrim’s destination) mentioned in the Mahābhārata (cf. III.81.74). Note: The Mahābhārata (mentioning Sarvadeva) is a Sanskrit epic poem consisting of 100,000 ślokas (metrical verses) and is over 2000 years old.

Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

[«previous next»] — Sarvadeva in Shaktism glossary
Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions (shaktism)

Sarvadeva (सर्वदेव) refers to “all the gods”, according to Sāhib Kaul’s Śārikāstrotra.—Accordingly, “[...] He who recites your next syllable, which is īśa with abja and the one above the left ear, his enemy, although invincible even for all the gods (sarvadevasarvairdevaiḥ), will instantly, in the wink of an eye, become a guest in the house of Death. He who remembers your next syllable, which is īśa together with vaktravṛtta and vahni, will have at his disposal ‘enjoyment’ (bhukti), liberation, the method of real vicāra, and devotion. [...]”.

Shaktism book cover
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Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Pancaratra (worship of Nārāyaṇa)

Source: Universität Wien: Sudarśana's Worship at the Royal Court According to the Ahirbudhnyasaṃhitā

Sarvadeva (सर्वदेव) refers to “all Gods”, according to the Ahirbudhnyasaṃhitā, belonging to the Pāñcarātra tradition which deals with theology, rituals, iconography, narrative mythology and others.—Accordingly, “[...] A Brāhmaṇa who is not supported may not act with it (i.e. the kriyāśakti) in this world. But he may perform with it for the good of the world, having first relied upon the King. For the King is the Supreme Being, he embodies all Gods (sarvadeva-maya) and is all-pervading. He is the base of the Creative Energy (kriyāśakti) belonging to Viṣṇu, and embodies the Lord. [...]”.

Pancaratra book cover
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Pancaratra (पाञ्चरात्र, pāñcarātra) represents a tradition of Hinduism where Narayana is revered and worshipped. Closeley related to Vaishnavism, the Pancaratra literature includes various Agamas and tantras incorporating many Vaishnava philosophies.

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India history and geography

Source: What is India: Epigraphia Indica volume XXXI (1955-56)

Sarvadeva is the name of a scribe, as mentioned in to the “Kalahandi Plates of Anantavarman Vajrahasta” (877 A.D.). The writer of the charter was Sarvadeva. The name of one Sarvadeva occurs as the engraver of the Chicacole plates of Devendravarman (Gaṅga year 251) also. Mr. Rajaguru thinks that the date of the Chicacole plates should be construed as 351 and the two Sarvadevas are to be treated as one and the same person. But there is a difficulty in accepting this suggestion.

These copper plates (mentioning Sarvadeva) were originally found in a village called Chīpurupalli about sixteen miles to the east of Parlakimedi in the Ganjam District, Orissa. It records a grant of some land to a Brāhmaṇa called Nārāyaṇa Jaḍyālākṣetra (son of Nārāyaṇa).

India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

[«previous next»] — Sarvadeva in Sanskrit glossary
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Sarvadeva (सर्वदेव):—[=sarva-deva] [from sarva] m. [plural] all the gods, [Macdonell’s Dictionary, etc.]

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Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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