Sarpashiras, aka: Sarpaśiras, Sarpa-shiras; 2 Definition(s)

Introduction

Sarpashiras means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit term Sarpaśiras can be transliterated into English as Sarpasiras or Sarpashiras, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Natyashastra (theatrics and dramaturgy)

Sarpashiras in Natyashastra glossary... « previous · [S] · next »

Sarpaśiras (सर्पशिरस्, “snake-head”) refers to a gesture (āṅgika) made with a ‘single hand’ (asaṃyuta), according to the Nāṭyaśāstra chapter 8. The hands (hasta) form a part of the human body which represents one of the six major limbs (aṅga) used in dramatic performance. With these limbs are made the various gestures (āṅgika), which form a part of the histrionic representation (abhinaya).

Source: Wisdom Library: Nāṭya-śāstra

Sarpaśiras (सर्पशिरस्, “snake-head”).—A type of gesture (āṅgika) made with a single hand (asaṃyuta-hasta);—(Instructions): The fingers including the thumb to be close to one another and the palm to be hollowed.

(Uses): It is used to represent the offering of water, movement of serpents, pouring water [on anything], challenging [for a duel], motion of the elephant’s frontal globes (kumhba) and the like.

Source: archive.org: Natya Shastra
Natyashastra book cover
context information

Natyashastra (नाट्यशास्त्र, nāṭyaśāstra) refers to both the ancient Indian tradition (śāstra) of performing arts, (nāṭya, e.g., theatrics, drama, dance, music), as well as the name of a Sanskrit work dealing with these subjects. It also teaches the rules for composing dramatic plays (nataka) and poetic works (kavya).

Discover the meaning of sarpashiras or sarpasiras in the context of Natyashastra from relevant books on Exotic India

Relevant definitions

Search found 365 related definition(s) that might help you understand this better. Below you will find the 15 most relevant articles:

Sira
Sīrā.—(IA 18), a land measure equal to four halas. See hala. Note: sīrā is defined in the “Indi...
Sarpa
Sarpa (सर्प).—A son of Tvaṣṭā. According to Agni Purāṇa the sons of Tvaṣṭā were called Ekādaśar...
Shiras
Śiras (शिरस्, “head”) refers to one of the seven “major limbs” (aṅga), which represents a divis...
Shiradhvaja
Sīradhvaja (सीरध्वज).—Janaka the father of Sītā. (For further details see under Janaka).
Shiroroga
Śiroroga (शिरोरोग) refers to “head disease”. Vatsanābha (Aconitum ferox), although categorized ...
Hayashiras
Hayaśiras (हयशिरस्).—According to the Mahābhārata, the fire of sage Aurva’s anger, cast into th...
Trishiras
Triśiras (त्रिशिरस्) is the name of an Asura who was reborn as Siddhārtha: one of the minister ...
Mrigashira
Mṛgaśira (मृगशिर).—n., Derivable forms: mṛgaśiraḥ (मृगशिरः).Mṛgaśira is a Sanskrit compound con...
Shirastrana
Śirastrāṇa (शिरस्त्राण).—1) a helmet; च्युतैः शिरस्त्रैश्चषकोत्तरेव (cyutaiḥ śirastraiścaṣakott...
Brahmashiras
Brahmaśiras (ब्रह्मशिरस्).—See Brahmāstra.
Sarpari
Sarpāri (सर्पारि).—1) an ichneumon. 2) a peacock. 3) an epithet of Garuḍa. Derivable forms: sar...
Mrigashiras
Mṛgaśiras (मृगशिरस्).—n., Mṛgaśiras is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms mṛga and śir...
Sarpasatra
Sarpasatra (सर्पसत्र).—See under Janamejaya, Part 5.
Shirashcakra
Sanskrit iconographic treatises insist that the Śiraścakra, (or “the halo surrounding the he...
Sarpasana
Sarpāśana (सर्पाशन).—a peacock. Derivable forms: sarpāśanaḥ (सर्पाशनः).Sarpāśana is a Sanskrit ...

Relevant text

Like what you read? Consider supporting this website: