Sapinda, Sapiṇḍa: 9 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Sapinda means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Dharmashastra (religious law)

Source: Google Books: Manusmṛti with the Manubhāṣya

The term Sapiṇḍa (सपिण्ड) indicates the relations on the mother’s side. According to another Smṛti, women are called the “mother’s sapiṇḍa’’ only up to three steps of relationship. But, as a matter of fact, marriage with relatives on the mother’s side is permitted beyond not the third, but the fifth, step of relationship. Says Gautama (4—3 and 5)—‘Beyond the seventh step of relationship on the Father’s side and beyond the fifth step on the mother’s side.’ (See the Manubhāṣya verse 3.3)

Dharmashastra book cover
context information

Dharmashastra (धर्मशास्त्र, dharmaśāstra) contains the instructions (shastra) regarding religious conduct of livelihood (dharma), ceremonies, jurisprudence (study of law) and more. It is categorized as smriti, an important and authoritative selection of books dealing with the Hindu lifestyle.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

sapiṇḍa (सपिंड).—m (S sa for samāna Common, piṇḍa Ball of rice &c. offered to the manes of ancestors.) One entitled to piṇḍa, i. e. any person of seven generations in direct line of ascent or descent: also one connected by the offering of the funeral cake to any one or all of the manes of the father, grandfather, and great grandfather, and their wives respectively, as sprung from them in directly collateral lines. The relationship stops with every fourth person; and the fifth cannot perform the offering of a cake even to the father of the deceased.

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sāpiṇḍa (सापिंड).—m A common corruption of sapiṇḍa.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Sapiṇḍa (सपिण्ड).—'Having the same पिण्ड (piṇḍa) or funeral rice-ball offering', a kinsman connected by the offering of the funeral rice-ball to the Manes of certain relations; गुरुदारे सपिण्डे वा गुरुवद्वृत्तिमाचरेत् (gurudāre sapiṇḍe vā guruvadvṛttimācaret) Ms.2.247;5.59; Y.1.52.

Derivable forms: sapiṇḍaḥ (सपिण्डः).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Sapiṇḍa (सपिण्ड).—m.

(-ṇḍaḥ) A kinsman, especially one connected by the offering of the funeral cake to either or all of the manes of the father, grandfather, and great-grandfather, and their wives respectively, as sprung from them in directly collateral lines; the relationship stops with every fourth person, as the fifth cannot perform the offering of a cake to the father even of the deceased. The following are enumerated as Sapindas:—the son, son’s son, and son’s grandson; widow, daughter and daughter’s son; the father, the mother, the brother, brother’s son, and brother’s grandson; father’s daughter’s son; father’s brother’s son and grandson; paternal grandfather’s daughter’s son; paternal grandfather; paternal grandmother, paternal grandfather’s brother, brother’s son and grandson; and lastly the great grandfather’s daughter’s son: these all present oblations in which the deceased is either included, or may participate: other enumerations, including the oblations he was bound to offer, &c. extend the connection of Sapinda to seven persons both in an ascending or descending line. E. sa for sasāna common, and piṇḍa ball of meat, &c., offered to the manes of the deceased ancestors, at the Srad'dhas performed in honour of them.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Sapiṇḍa (सपिण्ड).—m. a kinsman, especially one connected by the offering of the funeral cake to either or all of the manes of the father, grandfather, and great-grandfather, and their wives respectively, as sprung from them in directly collateral lines; the relationship stops with every fourth person. The following are enumerated as Sapiṇḍas: the son, son’s son, and son’s grandson; widow, daughter, and daughter’s son; the father, the mother, the brother, brother’s son, and brother’s grandson; father’s daughter’s son; paternal grandfather; paternal grandmother; paternal grandfather’s brother, brother’s son, and grandson; and lastly, the great-grandfather’s daughter’s son. Other enumerations extend the connection of Sapiṇḍas to seven persons, both in an ascending or descending line; cf. [Mānavadharmaśāstra] 2, 247; 3, 247. A-sapiṇḍa, adj., f. ḍā, Not descended from a relation within the sixth degree, [Mānavadharmaśāstra] 3, 5.

Sapiṇḍa is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms sa and piṇḍa (पिण्ड).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Sapiṇḍa (सपिण्ड).—related (in the sixth, [originally] only in the third generation); lit. sharing the funeral cake.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Sapiṇḍa (सपिण्ड):—[=sa-piṇḍa] [from sa > sa-pakṣa] a etc. See sub voce

2) [=sa-piṇḍa] b m. ‘having the same Piṇḍa’, a kinsman connected by the offering of the Piṇḍa (q.v.) to certain deceased ancestors at the Śrāddha (q.v.; the kinship is through six generations in an ascending and descending line, or through a man’s father, father’s father, father’s grandfather; mother, mother’s father, mother’s grandfather; son, son’s son, son’s grandson; daughter, daughter’s son etc.; and also includes father’s mother, father’s grandmother etc., also father’s brothers and sisters, mother’s brothers and sisters, and several others), [Gṛhya-sūtra and śrauta-sūtra; Gautama-dharma-śāstra; Manu-smṛti v, 60; Mahābhārata] etc. ([Religious Thought and Life in India 285]; 286 [Indian Wisdom, by Sir M. Monier-Williams 248; 266]).

3) Sāpiṇḍa (सापिण्ड):—n. = sāpiṇḍya, Dattakac.

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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