Sangrama, Saṅgrāma, Saṃgrāma, Samgrama: 17 definitions

Introduction:

Sangrama means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit, Marathi, Hindi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Dharmashastra (religious law)

Source: Wisdom Library: Dharma-śāstra

Saṅgrāma (सङ्ग्राम) refers to “battle” or “army”. It can also be spelled as Saṅgrāma (संग्राम). The word is used throughout Dharmaśāstra literature such as the Manusmṛti. (See the Manubhāṣya verse 7.87)

Dharmashastra book cover
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Dharmashastra (धर्मशास्त्र, dharmaśāstra) contains the instructions (shastra) regarding religious conduct of livelihood (dharma), ceremonies, jurisprudence (study of law) and more. It is categorized as smriti, an important and authoritative selection of books dealing with the Hindu lifestyle.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous next»] — Sangrama in Purana glossary
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

Saṅgrāma (सङ्ग्राम).—The most horrible war and Tārakāmaya in the fifth avatār.*

  • * Vāyu-purāṇa 97. 74.
Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions (shaktism)

Saṃgrāma (संग्राम) refers to a “battle”, according to the Mahābhārata 10.8.64–68.—Accordingly, “Good sir, they saw her, Kālarātri, standing, smiling, alone, blue-black in hue, with red mouth and eyes, garlands and unguents of crimson, red robes, a noose in one hand, a peacock feather [in her hair], binding men, horses and elephants with her horrifying fetters while she stood, capturing many headless ghosts trapped in her noose, leading those asleep in their dreams to other Nights. And at all times the best soldiers saw the son of Droṇa slaughtering. From the time when the battle (saṃgrāma) between the Kuru and Pāṇḍava armies began, they saw [both] that evil spirit and the son of Droṇa. The son of Droṇa later felled those who had first been struck by this divinity [Kālarātri], terrorizing all creatures while shouting out ferocious bellows”.

Shaktism book cover
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Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

Source: The University of Sydney: A study of the Twelve Reflections

Saṃgrāma (संग्राम) refers to a “battle”, according to the 11th century Jñānārṇava, a treatise on Jain Yoga in roughly 2200 Sanskrit verses composed by Śubhacandra.—Accordingly, “That which is evidently cessation of action causing the cycle of rebirth is to be considered as the mental stopping of the influx of karma by those who know about that from the most excellent scripture. Like the hero who is well-clad in armour is not pierced by arrows in the difficulty of battle [com.—in the middle of a battle (saṃgrāmamadhye)], the one who has subdued his senses, whose self is restrained, is not pierced by arrows which are made of non-restraint”.

Synonyms: Samara.

General definition book cover
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Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

saṅgrāma (संग्राम).—m S Conflict of armies, engagement, battle: also hostile attitude or relation of peoples, war.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

saṅgrāma (संग्राम).—m Battle; war; hostile attitude.

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Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Saṃgrāma (संग्राम).—War, battle, fight; संग्रामाङ्गणमागतेन भवता चापे समारोपिते (saṃgrāmāṅgaṇamāgatena bhavatā cāpe samāropite) K. P.1.

Derivable forms: saṃgrāmaḥ (संग्रामः).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Edgerton Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit Dictionary

Saṃgrama (संग्रम).—[, nt., read saṃkrama, q.v. (2).]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Saṅgrāma (सङ्ग्राम).—m.

(-maḥ) War, battle. E. saṅgrāma to fight, aff. ac .

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Saṃgrāma (संग्राम).—i. e. sam-grah + ma, m. 1. War, battle, [Hitopadeśa] 75, 17; fighting, [Pañcatantra] 238, 22. 2. A proper name, [Rājataraṅgiṇī] 5, 305; 423.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Saṃgrāma (संग्राम).—[masculine] popular assembly, host, troop; hostile encounter, fight, war, contest with ([instrumental] ±samam, saha, or sārdham, & —°).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Saṃgrāma (संग्राम):—[=saṃ-grāma] [from saṃ-grām] m. (and n., [Siddhānta-kaumudī]; cf., grāma) an assembly of people, host, troop, army, [Atharva-veda]

2) [v.s. ...] battle, war, fight, combat, conflict, hostile encounter with ([instrumental case] with and without samam, saka, sārdham, or [compound]), [ib.] etc. etc.

3) [v.s. ...] Name of various men, [Rājataraṅgiṇī; Catalogue(s)]

4) Sāṃgrāma (सांग्राम):—mfn. ([from] saṃ-grāma) [gana] vyuṣṭādi.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Saṅgrāma (सङ्ग्राम):—(ka) saṅgrāmayati, te 10. c. To fight.

2) (maḥ) 1. m. War, battle.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Saṅgrāma (सङ्ग्राम) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit word: Saṃgāma.

[Sanskrit to German]

Sangrama in German

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Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Hindi dictionary

[«previous next»] — Sangrama in Hindi glossary
Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

Saṃgrāma (संग्राम) [Also spelled sangram]:—(nm) war, battle; fight, combat.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Saṃgrāma (ಸಂಗ್ರಾಮ):—[noun] a conflict between armed forces in a war on a large-scale; a prolonged contest in a particular area; a battle.

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Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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