Samutpanna: 13 definitions

Introduction:

Samutpanna means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

[«previous next»] — Samutpanna in Shaktism glossary
Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

1) Samutpannā (समुत्पन्ना) refers to the “origination (of Mantras)”, according to the Ṣaṭsāhasrasaṃhitā, an expansion of the Kubjikāmatatantra: the earliest popular and most authoritative Tantra of the Kubjikā cult.—Accordingly, “[...] The form she bears is desire and, tranquil, (she) is you, Kubjinī the mother of Kula. Mantras originate [samutpannā] from that and so her nature is desire. And as her form is (coiled like an) earring (kuṇḍalī), she is said to be Kubjinī (‘bent over’). She is the goddess with two arms and one face, or with many arms and faces. She should be thought of at all times as being in accord with the form of passion. Established in movement, she is in the midst of movement. The mistress of motion, her body is movement. Motion is said to be the wind. She is said to be its mistress”.

2) Samutpanna (समुत्पन्न) refers to the “arising” (of the universe), according to the Śrīmatottara-tantra, an expansion of the Kubjikāmatatantra: the earliest popular and most authoritative Tantra of the Kubjikā cult.—Accordingly, “Akula is said to be the principle that, self-existent, does not require Kula in order to exist. It is Śiva, the supreme cause. Kula is that from which the universe arises (samutpannayato viśvaṃ samutpannaṃ). It is that in which it is established and where it is dissolved away. That Kula is said to be Kaula”.

Shaktism book cover
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Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous next»] — Samutpanna in Purana glossary
Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Samutpanna (समुत्पन्न) refers to the “birth” (of a son), according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.3.15 (“The penance and reign of Tārakāsura”).—Accordingly, as Tāraka said to Brahmā: “[...] O great lord, there should certainly be no man equal to me in strength in this entire universe created by you. If a son born of Śiva [i.e., samutpannaśivavīryasamutpannaḥ putraḥ] becomes the commander-in-chief of an army and discharges weapons against me, let my death occur then”.

Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Jyotisha (astronomy and astrology)

[«previous next»] — Samutpanna in Jyotisha glossary
Source: Wisdom Library: Brihat Samhita by Varahamihira

Samutpanna (समुत्पन्न) refers to “growing (crops)”, according to the Bṛhatsaṃhitā (chapter 15) (“On the nakṣatras—‘asterisms’”), an encyclopedic Sanskrit work written by Varāhamihira mainly focusing on the science of ancient Indian astronomy astronomy (Jyotiṣa).—Accordingly, “Those who are born on the lunar day of Anurādhā will be valiant; heads of parties; fond of the company of Sādhus, keep vehicles and grow every species of crop [i.e., śarad-samutpanna]. Those who are born on the lunar day of Jyeṣṭhā will be valiant, of good descent, wealthy, famous; disposed to cheat others of their property, fond of travelling, rulers of provinces or commanders of armies. [...]”.

Jyotisha book cover
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Jyotisha (ज्योतिष, jyotiṣa or jyotish) refers to ‘astronomy’ or “Vedic astrology” and represents the fifth of the six Vedangas (additional sciences to be studied along with the Vedas). Jyotisha concerns itself with the study and prediction of the movements of celestial bodies, in order to calculate the auspicious time for rituals and ceremonies.

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

[«previous next»] — Samutpanna in Shaivism glossary
Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions

Samutpanna (समुत्पन्न) refers to “(that which has) arisen (from the seed of desire)”, according to the Vārāṇasīmāhātmya verse 1.114.—Accordingly, “The great tree of transmigration has arisen from the seed of desire (rāga-bīja-samutpanna). After cutting the tree with the axe of indifference, whose sharp blade is disattachment, they proceed on the Atimārga”.

Source: SOAS University of London: Protective Rites in the Netra Tantra

Samutpanna (समुत्पन्न) refers to the “arising” (of seventy-million mantras), according to the Netratantra of Kṣemarāja: a Śaiva text from the 9th century in which Śiva (Bhairava) teaches Pārvatī topics such as metaphysics, cosmology, and soteriology.—Accordingly, [verse 2.22cd-28ab]—“From this authority, the seventy-million mantras arise (samutpanna). The terminal letter shining with various light, [which is the] split belly of the moon [j], is placed upon a hook [u], and yoked with the last rising horizon [i.e., the wind or last labial nasalization] []. That which is described is celebrated in the world as the supreme Amṛta [sa], this is the highest dwelling place. [...]”.

Shaivism book cover
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Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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In Buddhism

Tibetan Buddhism (Vajrayana or tantric Buddhism)

Source: OSU Press: Cakrasamvara Samadhi

Samutpanna (समुत्पन्न) refers to “arising together”, according to the Guru Mandala Worship (maṇḍalārcana) ritual often performed in combination with the Cakrasaṃvara Samādhi, which refers to the primary pūjā and sādhanā practice of Newah Mahāyāna-Vajrayāna Buddhists in Nepal.—Accordingly, “Vairocana Buddha in the middle, Akṣhyobhya abiding eastward, Amitābha in the west, and Ratnasaṃbhava in the south, Also Amoghasiddhi in the north, the permanent five Tathāgata, White, dark blue (and) yellow, one of the reds, (and) dark green, Going, sitting on a lion, elephant, horse, peacock, (and) an eagle, Five syllables arising together (samutpanna), Pañca Buddha, I give homage”.

Tibetan Buddhism book cover
context information

Tibetan Buddhism includes schools such as Nyingma, Kadampa, Kagyu and Gelug. Their primary canon of literature is divided in two broad categories: The Kangyur, which consists of Buddha’s words, and the Tengyur, which includes commentaries from various sources. Esotericism and tantra techniques (vajrayāna) are collected indepently.

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In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

[«previous next»] — Samutpanna in Jainism glossary
Source: The University of Sydney: A study of the Twelve Reflections

Samutpanna (समुत्पन्न) refers to “that which is produced” (by the objects of the senses), according to the 11th century Jñānārṇava, a treatise on Jain Yoga in roughly 2200 Sanskrit verses composed by Śubhacandra.—Accordingly, “Fool, having formed a delight in pleasure which is produced by the objects of the senses (hṛṣīkārtha-samutpanna) [and is] continually transitory, the three worlds are destroyed”.

General definition book cover
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Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

[«previous next»] — Samutpanna in Sanskrit glossary
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Samutpanna (समुत्पन्न).—mfn.

(-nnaḥ-nnā-nnaṃ) 1. Born, produced. 2. Occurring, taking place. E. sam and ud before pad to go, kta aff.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Samutpanna (समुत्पन्न).—[adjective] born, produced, begotten by ([ablative]) with ([locative]); come, arrived.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Samutpanna (समुत्पन्न):—[=sam-utpanna] [from samut-pad] mfn. sprung up together, arisen, produced, begotten by ([ablative]) or on ([locative case]), occurred, happened, taking place, [Manu-smṛti; Mahābhārata etc.]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Samutpanna (समुत्पन्न):—[samu-tpanna] (nnaḥ-nnā-nnaṃ) p. Born; occurring.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Samutpanna (समुत्पन्न) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit words: Samuppaṇṇa, Samuppanna.

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Kannada-English dictionary

[«previous next»] — Samutpanna in Kannada glossary
Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Samutpanna (ಸಮುತ್ಪನ್ನ):—[adjective] that has come into existence, life; born.

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Samutpanna (ಸಮುತ್ಪನ್ನ):—

1) [noun] that has come into existence, life.

2) [noun] a man (who is born).

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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