Samtyakta, Saṃtyakta, Santyakta: 8 definitions

Introduction:

Samtyakta means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

[«previous next»] — Samtyakta in Shaktism glossary
Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

Saṃtyakta (संत्यक्त) means “abandoned” (e.g., one who has ‘abandoned’ something), according to the Manthānabhairavatantra, a vast sprawling work that belongs to a corpus of Tantric texts concerned with the worship of the goddess Kubjikā.—Accordingly, “(The Śāmbhava yogi) has the authority (to perform the rites), knows the scripture and has a consort. He practices secretly and is always a renouncer. (Being) a householder, he observes the Rule. Solitary, he has a wife and, well hidden, he eats the sacrificial pap. One who has abandoned strife [i.e., saṃtyakta-vigraha], (being) tranquil and austere, he attains (the liberated state of) the Skyfarer. He has obtained initiation and, consecrated, he desires success in mantra. [...]”.

Shaktism book cover
context information

Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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In Buddhism

Mahayana (major branch of Buddhism)

[«previous next»] — Samtyakta in Mahayana glossary
Source: academia.edu: A Study and Translation of the Gaganagañjaparipṛcchā

Saṃtyakta (संत्यक्त) refers to the “giving up (the society of householders)”, according to the Gaganagañjaparipṛcchā: the eighth chapter of the Mahāsaṃnipāta (a collection of Mahāyāna Buddhist Sūtras).—Accordingly, “[...] At that time, sixty koṭis of Bodhisattvas, having stood up from the congregation, joined their palms, paid homage to the Lord, and then uttered these verses in one voice: ‘[...] (217) With gifts and kind treatment, we will bring them to maturity, and afterwards exhort them so that they can truly [enter into] the sphere of no wickedness. (218) Giving up the society of householders (gṛhin-saṃbhava-saṃtyakta), with small properties and few duties, dwelling in wilderness or forest, we will become like deers. [...]’”.

Mahayana book cover
context information

Mahayana (महायान, mahāyāna) is a major branch of Buddhism focusing on the path of a Bodhisattva (spiritual aspirants/ enlightened beings). Extant literature is vast and primarely composed in the Sanskrit language. There are many sūtras of which some of the earliest are the various Prajñāpāramitā sūtras.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

[«previous next»] — Samtyakta in Sanskrit glossary
Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Saṃtyakta (संत्यक्त).—p. p.

1) Completely deserted or abandoned.

2) Robbed, deprived of.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Santyakta (सन्त्यक्त).—mfn.

(-ktaḥ-ktā-ktaṃ) Left, abandoned. E. sam, and vyaj to leave, kta aff.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Saṃtyakta (संत्यक्त).—[adjective] destitute of, wanting ([instrumental] or —°).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Saṃtyakta (संत्यक्त):—[=saṃ-tyakta] [from saṃ-tyaj] mfn. entirely relinquished or abandoned, left, [Rāmāyaṇa]

2) [v.s. ...] deprived or destitute of, wanting, lacking ([instrumental case] or [compound]), [Varāha-mihira’s Bṛhat-saṃhitā; Pañcatantra]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Santyakta (सन्त्यक्त):—[sa-ntyakta] (ktaḥ-ktā-ktaṃ) p. Abandoned.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Saṃtyakta (संत्यक्त) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit word: Saṃcatta.

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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