Samprapya, Samprāpya, Sam-prapya: 3 definitions

Introduction:

Samprapya means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

[«previous next»] — Samprapya in Shaivism glossary
Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions

Samprāpya (सम्प्राप्य) refers to “joining” (a particular tradition), according to the 13th-century Matsyendrasaṃhitā: a Kubjikā-Tripurā oriented Tantric Yoga text of the Ṣaḍanvayaśāmbhava tradition from South India.—Accordingly, “After this, O Śivā, hear the exposition of the Kula Conduct. After he has joined (samprāpya) the tradition of the Siddhas, he should worship his guru as divine. The Yogin who is engaged in the worship of his guru can obtain the highest Power (siddhi). [...]”.

Shaivism book cover
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Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous next»] — Samprapya in Purana glossary
Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Samprāpya (सम्प्राप्य) refers to “becoming (unconscious)”, according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.3.30 (“The Celebration of Pārvatī’s Return”).—Accordingly, as Brahmā narrated to Nārada: “[...] O sage, on hearing the sweet songs, and seeing the delightful dance, the people entered into raptures of ecstacy. Pārvatī became (samprāpya) unconscious. She saw Śiva’s handsome form, bearing trident and other symbols before her vision. He had smeared the ashes all over His body. He was wearing a garland of bones. His face was beaming with his shining three eyes. He had the sacred thread of a serpent. Exquisitely white in complexion, the handsome lord Śiva, the friend of the distressed, the ocean of mercy was repeating the words ‘Choose the boon (or the bridegroom)’. On seeing Him thus in her mind she bowed to Him. Mentally she had chosen the boon when she had said, ‘Be my husband’.”.

Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

[«previous next»] — Samprapya in Sanskrit glossary
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Samprāpya (सम्प्राप्य):—[=sam-prāpya] [from sam-prāpta > sam-prānta] mfn. to be fully attained to, attainable, obtainable, [Monier-Williams’ Sanskrit-English Dictionary]

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Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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