Samkasha, Saṃkāśa, Saṅkāsa, Sankasha, Sankasa: 14 definitions

Introduction:

Samkasha means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Buddhism, Pali, Jainism, Prakrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit term Saṃkāśa can be transliterated into English as Samkasa or Samkasha, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

Saṅkāśa (सङ्काश) refers to “that which shines”, according to the Manthānabhairavatantra, a vast sprawling work that belongs to a corpus of Tantric texts concerned with the worship of the goddess Kubjikā.—Accordingly, “(Kubjikā) is the colour of (dark) blue collyrium. [...] She wears a tiger skin and a cloak of lion skin. Her limbs are adorned with divine ornaments and she laughs loudly. Her western face is yellow and the one in the north is dark blue. (The one) in the south is black. The eastern one, displayed in front, is red while the one born in the north-east (i.e. above) is (white) as crystal. The uppermost face, worshipped as Parā, (shines) like a thousand suns [i.e., sahasrasūrya-saṅkāśa]. Śambhu has said that all the faces have fierce gaping mouths with protruding teeth”.

Shaktism book cover
context information

Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Source: SOAS University of London: Protective Rites in the Netra Tantra

Saṃkāśa (संकाश) refers to “resembling” (e.g., ‘one who resembles a blue linseed flower’), according to the Netratantra of Kṣemarāja: a Śaiva text from the 9th century in which Śiva (Bhairava) teaches Pārvatī topics such as metaphysics, cosmology, and soteriology.—Accordingly, [verse 13.1-9, while describing the appearance and worship of Viṣṇu, in the form of Nārāyaṇa]—“Thus, [I have] spoken the kaulika rule of the mantrarāṭ. I again shall tell another method by which [the deity] grants fruits. He should always think of the four-armed Nārāyaṇa arising. [Nārāyaṇa has] two, long, lotus petal eyes, one face, has the appearance of a [blue] linseed flower (atasīpuṣpa-saṃkāśa), [and is] adorned with all [of his] instruments: a conch, discus, mace, and lotus. [...]”.

Shaivism book cover
context information

Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

[«previous next»] — Samkasha in Pali glossary
Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

saṅkāsa : (adj.) similar.

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Saṅkāsa, (saṃ+kāsa, of kāś, cp. okāsa) appearance; (-°) having the appearance of, like, similar J. II, 150; V, 71, 155, 370 (puñña°=sadisa C.); Bu 17, 21; Miln. 2. (Page 662)

Pali book cover
context information

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Saṃkāśa (संकाश).—a.

1) Like, similar, resembling (at the end of comp.); अग्नि°, हिरण्य° (agni°, hiraṇya°); विपत्तिं घोरसंकाशां क्रुद्धादग्निशिखामिव (vipattiṃ ghorasaṃkāśāṃ kruddhādagniśikhāmiva) Rām.7.81.4.

2) Near, close, at hand.

-śaḥ 1 Appearance, presence.

2) Vicinity.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Saṅkāśa (सङ्काश).—mfn.

(-śaḥ-śā-śaṃ) 1. Like, similar, (in composition.) 2. Near. m.

(-śaḥ) Appearance, presence. E. sam before kāś to shine, aff. ac .

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Saṃkāśa (संकाश).—[-saṃkāśa], i. e. sam-kāś + a, latter part of comp. adj. Like, similar; e. g. gaja-, adj. Resembling elephants, Chr. 4, 18. mṛtyu-, adj. death-like, ib. 39, 8. adbhuta-, adj. well-nigh marvellous, [Johnson's Selections from the Mahābhārata.] 36, 6.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Saṃkāśa (संकाश).—[masculine] appearance; adj. —° appearing like, similar to.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Saṃkāśa (संकाश):—[=saṃ-kāśa] [from saṃ-kāś] m. (ifc. f(ā). ) look, appearance (often ifc. = ‘having the appearance of’, ‘looking like’, ‘resembling’), [Atharva-veda] etc. etc.

2) [v.s. ...] vicinity, neighbourhood ([wrong reading] for sa-k), [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Saṅkāśa (सङ्काश):—[sa-ṅkāśa] (śaḥ-śā-śaṃ) a. Like; near.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Saṃkāśa (संकाश) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit word: Saṃkāsa.

[Sanskrit to German]

Samkasha in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Prakrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary

Saṃkāsa (संकास) in the Prakrit language is related to the Sanskrit word: Saṃkāśa.

context information

Prakrit is an ancient language closely associated with both Pali and Sanskrit. Jain literature is often composed in this language or sub-dialects, such as the Agamas and their commentaries which are written in Ardhamagadhi and Maharashtri Prakrit. The earliest extant texts can be dated to as early as the 4th century BCE although core portions might be older.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Saṃkāśa (ಸಂಕಾಶ):—

1) [adjective] close in distance or time; not far; near.

2) [adjective] like one another; showing resemblance; similar.

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Saṃkāśa (ಸಂಕಾಶ):—

1) [noun] the state of being near or close by; nearness; proximity; vicinity.

2) [noun] the act or an instance of appearing; appearance.

3) [noun] great lustre; splendour; brilliance.

4) [noun] that which is alike, similar.

5) [noun] a man who resembles something or another person.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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