Samgrahana, Saṅgrahaṇa, Saṃgrahaṇa, Sangrahana: 21 definitions

Introduction:

Samgrahana means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India, Marathi, Hindi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

Alternative spellings of this word include Sangrahan.

In Hinduism

Pancaratra (worship of Nārāyaṇa)

Source: archive.org: Catalogue of Pancaratra Agama Texts

Saṃgrahaṇa (संग्रहण) refers to “taking over” (a new plot) (for a building), as discussed in the eighth chapter of the Kapiñjalasaṃhitā: a Pāñcarātra work consisting of 1550 verses dealing with a variety of topics such as worship in a temple, choosing an Ācārya, architecture, town-planning and iconography.—Description of the chapter [bhū-saṃgrahaṇa]:—This chapter turns to the first activities undertaken on a new plot. [...] Certain omens are to be noted, and if bad omens are encountered śāntihoma must be done (17-18). Seeds are sown while repeating the aṣṭākṣara-mantra, and their sprouting-time is taken as an omen (19-22). The plot, after a month during which time cattle are allowed to graze, is to be plowed again whereupon Brahmins are fed (23-25).

Pancaratra book cover
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Pancaratra (पाञ्चरात्र, pāñcarātra) represents a tradition of Hinduism where Narayana is revered and worshipped. Closeley related to Vaishnavism, the Pancaratra literature includes various Agamas and tantras incorporating many Vaishnava philosophies.

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Dharmashastra (religious law)

Source: Shodhganga: The Vyavaharadhyaya of the Yajnavalkyasmriti

Saṃgrahaṇa (संग्रहण) refers to “illegal or unlawful union of man or woman for sexual enjoyment” according to the Mitākṣarā.—Yājñavalkya has placed the strīsaṃgrahaṇa as the nineteenth title of law which consists of twelve verses. This title of law regulates all the unethical acts or behaviours relating to women, which the society does not permit. The Mitākṣarā explains saṃgrahaṇa as illegal or unlawful union of man or woman for sexual enjoyment. According to Viśvarūpa, saṃgrahaṇa denotes having relation with other’s married wife. Aparārka comments that saṃgrahaṇa is the sexual union or enjoyment with the wife of other person. However, it may be noticed that Yājñavalkya has dealt with offences like abduction of a maiden and other forms of sexual offences within this topic of law.

Dharmashastra book cover
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Dharmashastra (धर्मशास्त्र, dharmaśāstra) contains the instructions (shastra) regarding religious conduct of livelihood (dharma), ceremonies, jurisprudence (study of law) and more. It is categorized as smriti, an important and authoritative selection of books dealing with the Hindu lifestyle.

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Arthashastra (politics and welfare)

Source: archive.org: Kautilya’s Arthasastra

Saṃgrahaṇa (संग्रहण) refers to a type of building (=fort) which is to be placed in the centre of a collection of ten villages, according to Kauṭilya Arthaśāstra, Chapter 5.5 (“formation of villages”).—Villages consisting each of not less than a hundred families and of not more than five hundred families of agricultural people of śūdra caste, with boundaries extending as far as a krośa (2,250 yds.) or two, and capable of protecting each other, shall be formed. [...] There shall be set up a sthānīya (a fortress of that name) in the centre of eight hundred villages, a droṇamukha in the centre of four hundred villages, khārvātika in the centre of two hundred villages and a saṅgrahaṇa in the midst of a collection of ten villages.

Arthashastra book cover
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Arthashastra (अर्थशास्त्र, arthaśāstra) literature concerns itself with the teachings (shastra) of economic prosperity (artha) statecraft, politics and military tactics. The term arthashastra refers to both the name of these scientific teachings, as well as the name of a Sanskrit work included in such literature. This book was written (3rd century BCE) by by Kautilya, who flourished in the 4th century BCE.

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Mīmāṃsā (school of philosophy)

[«previous next»] — Samgrahana in Mimamsa glossary
Source: Shodhganga: Methodology of interpretation of Vedic injunctions by Mimamsakas

Saṃgrahaṇa (संग्रहण) refers to “mental acknowledgement with unanimous support among men”.—There is an injunction in Veda—‘vaiśvadevīṃ sāṃgrahaṇīṃ nirvapet grāmakāmaḥ’ (“one who wants to gain village should perform the Sāṃgrahanī sacrifice to Viśvadevas”).—Sāṃgrahaṇa means, according to Sāyaṇācarya, mental acknowledgement with unanimous support among men. Sāṃgrahaṇī sacrifice (iṣṭi) means in which sacrifice such kind of acknowledgement is seen. [...]

Mimamsa book cover
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Mimamsa (मीमांसा, mīmāṃsā) refers to one of the six orthodox Hindu schools of philosophy, emphasizing the nature of dharma and the philosophy of language. The literature in this school is also known for its in-depth study of ritual actions and social duties.

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Shaiva philosophy

Source: Open Editions: Mrigendra-Agama (with commentaries)

Saṃgrahaṇa (संग्रहण, “perception”) refers to the “grasp of the structure of the object (thanks to the information obtained about it)” according to the Mṛgendrāgama Jñānapāda chapter 2 (“refutation of other doctrines of salvation”).—[Cf. verse 215 with Dīpikā]—By “application” (yoga) we must understand here the contact of the senses with their objects and by “perception” (sāṃgrahaṇa) the grasp of the structure of the object thanks to the information obtained (about it).

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

[«previous next»] — Samgrahana in Shaktism glossary
Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

Saṃgrahaṇa (संग्रहण) refers to the “collection (of the fifty lords)” (of the letters of the alphabet) according to the Saṃvartārthaprakāśa.—According to Monier-Williams, the word piṇḍa means “any round or roundish mass or heap, a ball, globe, knob, button, clod, lump, piece... any solid mass or material object, the body, bodily frame”. The piṇḍa meant here is the kulapiṇḍa—“the body of Kula”. According to the Kaulajñānanirṇaya (4/13ab), it is made of the fifty letters of the alphabet (akārādihakārāntaṃ kulapiṇḍasya bhairavi). Similarly, the Saṃvartārthaprakāśa explains: “the body is a collection of the fifty lords of the letters” (pañcāśadvarṇādhipānāṃ saṃgrahaṇaṃ piṇḍam). The Ambāmatasaṃhitā explains that the aggregate of phonemic energies is within the goddess. The combined energies of the letters generate other sonic bodies—the mantras and seed-syllables

Shaktism book cover
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Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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In Buddhism

Mahayana (major branch of Buddhism)

[«previous next»] — Samgrahana in Mahayana glossary
Source: Wisdom Library: Maha Prajnaparamita Sastra

Saṃgrahaṇa (संग्रहण) refers to the “concentration (of the mind)”, according to Mahāprajñāpāramitāśāstra (chapter 41).—Accordingly, “[The eighteen āveṇika-dharmas (‘special attributes’)]— [...] (6). The Buddha has no unconsidered equanimity.—He has no unconsidered equanimity.—[...] Upekṣā is also part of the seven factors of enlightenment (saṃbodhyaṅga); when the mind is completely balanced, when it is not sinking or being scattered, this is when equanimity (upekṣā) should be practiced. In the moments of sinking, one practices the notion of exertion (vīryasaṃjñā), and in the moments of distraction, one practices the notion of concentration of the mind (citta-saṃgrahaṇa-saṃjñā). [...]”.

Mahayana book cover
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Mahayana (महायान, mahāyāna) is a major branch of Buddhism focusing on the path of a Bodhisattva (spiritual aspirants/ enlightened beings). Extant literature is vast and primarely composed in the Sanskrit language. There are many sūtras of which some of the earliest are the various Prajñāpāramitā sūtras.

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India history and geography

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary

Saṃgrahaṇa.—adultery (Ep. Ind., Vol. XXV, p. 237). Note: saṃgrahaṇa is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary

Saṅgrahaṇa.—(IE 8-5), adultery. Note: saṅgrahaṇa is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as mythology, zoology, royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

[«previous next»] — Samgrahana in Marathi glossary
Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

Saṅgrahaṇa (सङ्ग्रहण).—n S Collecting, accumulating, amassing, assembling, gathering together.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

Saṅgrahaṇa (सङ्ग्रहण).—n Collecting, assembling, amassing

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

[«previous next»] — Samgrahana in Sanskrit glossary
Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Saṃgrahaṇa (संग्रहण).—

1) Seizing, grasping.

2) Supporting, encouraging.

3) Compiling, collecting.

4) Blending.

5) Incasing, setting; कनकभूषणसंग्रहणोचितः (kanakabhūṣaṇasaṃgrahaṇocitaḥ) (maṇiḥ) Pañcatantra (Bombay) 1.75.

6) Sexual union, intercourse with a female.

7) Adultery; Manusmṛti 8.6.72; सर्वसाक्षी संग्रहेण चौर्यपारुष्यसाहसे (sarvasākṣī saṃgraheṇa cauryapāruṣyasāhase) Y.2.72.

8) Hoping.

9) Accepting, receiving.

-ṇī Dysentery.

Derivable forms: saṃgrahaṇam (संग्रहणम्).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Saṅgrahaṇa (सङ्ग्रहण).—n.

(-ṇaṃ) 1. Taking, accepting, seizing. 2. Sexual intercourse. 3. Hope. 4. Collecting. 5. Compiling. 6. Encasing. 7. Adultery. f. (-ṇī) Diarrhœa, dysentery. E. sam before grah to take, and lyuṭ aff.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Saṃgrahaṇa (संग्रहण).—i. e. sam-grah + ana, I. n. 1. Collecting, compiling. 2. Enchasing, [Hitopadeśa] ii. [distich] 71. 3. Sexual intercourse. 4. Adultery, [Mānavadharmaśāstra] 8, 72; cf. 6; 356, sqq. 5. Taking. 6. Accepting. 7. Hope. Ii. f. ṇī, Dysentery.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Saṃgrahaṇa (संग्रहण).—[adjective] seizing, grasping. [neuter] seizing, getting, acquiring, collecting, enumerating; checking, restraining; attracting, conciliating, seducing, committing adultery (±strī).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Saṃgrahaṇa (संग्रहण):—[=saṃ-grahaṇa] [from saṃ-grabh] mf(ī)n. grasping, seizing, taking, [Atharva-veda; Gobhila-śrāddha-kalpa]

2) [=saṃ-grahaṇa] [from saṃ-grabh] n. the act of grasping or taking (See pāṇi-s)

3) [v.s. ...] receiving, obtaining, acquisition, [Rāmāyaṇa]

4) [v.s. ...] gathering, compiling, accumulating, [Kāvya literature; Kathāsaritsāgara]

5) [v.s. ...] encasing, inlaying (of a jewel), [Pañcatantra]

6) [v.s. ...] complete enumeration, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

7) [v.s. ...] stopping, restraining, suppressing, [Suśruta; Vāgbhaṭālaṃkāra]

8) [v.s. ...] attraction, winning over, propitiation, [Taittirīya-saṃhitā; Mahābhārata]

9) [v.s. ...] sexual intercourse with ([compound]), adultery, [Manu-smṛti; Yājñavalkya; Varāha-mihira’s Bṛhat-saṃhitā]

10) Sāṃgrahaṇa (सांग्रहण):—mf(ī)n. ([from] saṃgrahaṇa) relating to the act of taking possession or occupying, [Taittirīya-saṃhitā; Taittirīya-brāhmaṇa]

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Saṃgrahaṇa (संग्रहण) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit words: Saṃgahaṇa, Saṃgiṇhaṇa.

[Sanskrit to German]

Samgrahana in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Hindi dictionary

[«previous next»] — Samgrahana in Hindi glossary
Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

Saṃgrahaṇa (संग्रहण) [Also spelled sangrahan]:—(nm) collection; reception; ~[śīla] receptive; ~[śīlatā] receptivity.

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Kannada-English dictionary

[«previous next»] — Samgrahana in Kannada glossary
Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Saṃgrahaṇa (ಸಂಗ್ರಹಣ):—[noun] = ಸಂಗ್ರಹ - [samgraha -] 1, 2 & 6.

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Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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