Samgara, Saṅgara, Saṃgara, Shamgara, Sangara, Saṃgāra: 16 definitions

Introduction:

Samgara means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Buddhism, Pali, Marathi, Jainism, Prakrit, Hindi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

Alternative spellings of this word include Sangar.

In Hinduism

Jyotisha (astronomy and astrology)

Source: Wisdom Library: Brihat Samhita by Varahamihira

Saṅgara (सङ्गर) refers to “strife”, according to the Bṛhatsaṃhitā (chapter 9), an encyclopedic Sanskrit work written by Varāhamihira mainly focusing on the science of ancient Indian astronomy astronomy (Jyotiṣa).—Accordingly, “If the course of Jupiter, Mercury, Mars and Saturn should just precede that of Venus, mankind, elephants and magicians will be at strife among themselves [i.e., saṅgara]; storms and deaths will afflict mankind. Friends will cease to be friends; the Brahmins will cease to perform religious ceremonies properly; there will be no rain; and mountains will be riven asunder thunderbolts”.

Jyotisha book cover
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Jyotisha (ज्योतिष, jyotiṣa or jyotish) refers to ‘astronomy’ or “Vedic astrology” and represents the fifth of the six Vedangas (additional sciences to be studied along with the Vedas). Jyotisha concerns itself with the study and prediction of the movements of celestial bodies, in order to calculate the auspicious time for rituals and ceremonies.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Saṅgara (सङ्गर) refers to “one’s resolution”, according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.4.7 (“Commencement of the War”).—Accordingly, as Brahmā narrated to Nārada: “[...] Duels were fought by the gods and the Asuras crushing each other, on seeing which heroes were delighted and cowards were terrified. [...] Thus the gods and the Asuras, fought duels using their full strength with resolution (saṅgara). O sage, desiring to gain the upper hand and vying with each other, the powerful gods and the Asuras were equally invincible in the battle. [...]”.

Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Sports, Arts and Entertainment (wordly enjoyments)

[«previous next»] — Samgara in Arts glossary
Source: archive.org: Syainika Sastra of Rudradeva with English Translation (art)

Saṃgara (संगर) refers to the “fight” (of a hawk), according to the Śyainika-śāstra: a Sanskrit treatise dealing with the divisions and benefits of Hunting and Hawking, written by Rājā Rudradeva (or Candradeva) in possibly the 13th century.—Accordingly, [while discussing the outlines of hawking]: “Saras Cranes and Comnon Cranes attached by a Kuhī excite a fierce emotion, for they are like winged mountains pursuing each other. Falling on the ground, they strike each other with their talons and make a fierce noise; then changing their position, they strike each other with their beaks in a terrible fight (raudra-saṃgara)”.

Arts book cover
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This section covers the skills and profiencies of the Kalas (“performing arts”) and Shastras (“sciences”) involving ancient Indian traditions of sports, games, arts, entertainment, love-making and other means of wordly enjoyments. Traditionally these topics were dealt with in Sanskrit treatises explaing the philosophy and the justification of enjoying the pleasures of the senses.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

[«previous next»] — Samgara in Pali glossary
Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Saṅgara, (fr. saṃ+gṛ1 to sing, proclaim, cp. gāyati & gīta) 1. a promise, agreement J. IV, 105, 111, 473; V, 25, 479; saṅgaraṃ karoti to make a compact Vin. I, 247; J. IV, 105; V, 479.—2. (also nt.) a fight M. III, 187=Nett 149; S. V, 109. (Page 666)

Pali book cover
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Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

Saṅgara (सङ्गर).—f n The narrow and diversely-colored border or stripe (of a dhotar, patal, and similar cloth) between the outer or main border and the ground. 2 A narrow track over a hill.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Saṃgara (संगर).—

1) A promise, an agreement; तथेति तस्या वितथं प्रतीतः प्रत्यग्रहीत् संगरमग्रजन्मा (tatheti tasyā vitathaṃ pratītaḥ pratyagrahīt saṃgaramagrajanmā) R.5.26;11.48; पलितसंगराय (palitasaṃgarāya) 13.65.

2) Accepting, undertaking.

3) A bargain.

4) War, battle, fight; छलबहुलमरीणां संगरं हा हतोऽस्मि (chalabahulamarīṇāṃ saṃgaraṃ hā hato'smi) Ve.5.21; अतरत् स्वभुजौजसा मुहुर्महतः संगरसागरानसौ (atarat svabhujaujasā muhurmahataḥ saṃgarasāgarānasau) Śiśupālavadha 16. 67.

5) Knowledge.

6) Devouring.

7) Misfortune, calamity.

8) Poison.

-ram The fruit of the Śamī tree.

Derivable forms: saṃgaraḥ (संगरः).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Saṅgara (सङ्गर).—m.

(-raḥ) 1. War, battle. 2. Misfortune, calamity. 3. Promise, assent, agreement. 4. A bargain, a transaction of sale. 5. Poison. 6. Knowledge. 7. Acceptance. n.

(-raṃ) The fruit of the Sami tree. E. sam before gṝ to swallow, aff. ap .

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Saṃgara (संगर).—i. e. sam-gṛ10 + a, I. m. 1. Agreement. 2. Promise, [Indralokāgamana] 4, 12. 3. A transaction of sale. 4. War, battle, [Mānavadharmaśāstra] 4, 121; [Bhartṛhari, (ed. Bohlen.)] 2, 85. 5. Misfortune. 6. Poison (cf. gara). Ii. n. The fruit of the Śamī tree.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Saṃgara (संगर).—[masculine] agreement, promise; fight, contest with ([instrumental]), about ([genetive]).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Śaṃgarā (शंगरा):—[=śaṃ-garā] [from śaṃ > śam] f. = śaṃkarā, [Patañjali]

2) Saṃgara (संगर):—[=saṃ-gara] a etc. See saṃ- √1. 2. gṝ.

3) [=saṃ-gara] [from saṃ-gṝ] 1. saṃ-gara m. agreeing together, agreement, assent, [Atharva-veda] etc. etc.

4) [v.s. ...] conflict, combat, fight, battle with ([instrumental case]) or for ([genitive case]), [Manu-smṛti; Mahābhārata] etc.

5) [v.s. ...] a bargain, transaction of sale, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

6) [v.s. ...] knowledge, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

7) [=saṃ-gara] [from saṃ-gṝ] 2. saṃ-gara m. swallowing up, devouring, [Monier-Williams’ Sanskrit-English Dictionary]

8) [v.s. ...] n. poison, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

9) [v.s. ...] misfortune, calamity, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

10) [v.s. ...] the Śamī fruit, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Saṅgara (सङ्गर):—[sa-ṅgara] (raḥ) 1. m. War; misfortune; poison; promise; bargain; knowledge. n. Fruit of the sami tree.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Saṃgara (संगर) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit word: Saṃgara.

[Sanskrit to German]

Samgara in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Hindi dictionary

[«previous next»] — Samgara in Hindi glossary
Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

Saṃgara (संगर) [Also spelled sangar]:—(nm) a battle, fighting, hedge.

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Prakrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary

Saṃgara (संगर) in the Prakrit language is related to the Sanskrit word: Saṃgara.

context information

Prakrit is an ancient language closely associated with both Pali and Sanskrit. Jain literature is often composed in this language or sub-dialects, such as the Agamas and their commentaries which are written in Ardhamagadhi and Maharashtri Prakrit. The earliest extant texts can be dated to as early as the 4th century BCE although core portions might be older.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Saṃgara (ಸಂಗರ):—

1) [noun] a promise or oath taken or given.

2) [noun] a conflict between armed forces in a war on a large-scale; a prolonged contest in a particular area; a battle.

3) [noun] the act of eating hungrily, greedily or voraciously; a devouring.

4) [noun] the flesh of animals used as food; meat.

5) [noun] a stupid fellow; a blockhead.

6) [noun] keen mental suffering or distress; grief.

7) [noun] a day and a night.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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