Samanga, Samaṃgā, Samamga, Samaṅgā, Samaṅga, Shamanga: 13 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Samanga means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, Hindi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

Alternative spellings of this word include Samang.

In Hinduism

Rasashastra (chemistry and alchemy)

Source: Wisdom Library: Rasa-śāstra

Samaṃgā (समंगा):—One of the sixty-eight Rasauṣadhi, very powerful drugs known to be useful in alchemical processes related to mercury (rasa), according to Rasaprakāśa-sudhākara (chapter 9).

Rasashastra book cover
context information

Rasashastra (रसशास्त्र, rasaśāstra) is an important branch of Ayurveda, specialising in chemical interactions with herbs, metals and minerals. Some texts combine yogic and tantric practices with various alchemical operations. The ultimate goal of Rasashastra is not only to preserve and prolong life, but also to bestow wealth upon humankind.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopedia

1) Samaṅga (समङ्ग).—A cowherd who had been looking after the cattle of Duryodhana. (Mahābhārata Vana Parva, Chapter 289, Verse 2).

2) Samaṅga (समङ्ग).—An ancient hermit. Once this hermit talked to Nārada, about his comfortable life. (Mahābhārata Śānti Parva, Chapter 286, Verse 5).

3) Samaṅgā (समङ्गा).—A river. Because Aṣṭāvakra bathed in this river, his bents were straightened. (See under Aṣṭāvakra).

4) Samaṅga (समङ्ग).—A country in South India. Mention is made about this country in Mahābhārata, Bhīṣma Parva, Chapter 9, Verse 60.

Source: JatLand: List of Mahabharata people and places

Samaṅga (समङ्ग) is a name mentioned in the Mahābhārata (cf. VI.10.59) and represents one of the many proper names used for people and places. Note: The Mahābhārata (mentioning Samaṅga) is a Sanskrit epic poem consisting of 100,000 ślokas (metrical verses) and is over 2000 years old.

Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: WorldCat: Rāj nighaṇṭu

1) Samaṅgā (समङ्गा) is another name for Balā, a medicinal plant identified with Sida cordifolia Linn. (“country mellow” or “flannel weed”) from the Malvaceae or mallows family of flowering plants, according to verse 4.88-91 of the 13th-century Raj Nighantu or Rājanighaṇṭu. The fourth chapter (śatāhvādi-varga) of this book enumerates eighty varieties of small plants (pṛthu-kṣupa). Together with the names Samaṅgā and Balā, there are a total of twenty-three Sanskrit synonyms identified for this plant.

2) Samaṅgā (समङ्गा) is also mentioned as a synonym for Lajjālu, a medicinal plant identified with Mimosa pudica Linn. or “sensitive plant” from the Fabaceae or “legume” family of flowering plants, according to verse 5.103-106. The fifth chapter (parpaṭādi-varga) of this book enumerates sixty varieties of smaller plants (kṣudra-kṣupa). Together with the names Samaṅgā and Lajjālu, there are a total of twenty-two Sanskrit synonyms identified for this plant.

Source: Shodhganga: Edition translation and critical study of yogasarasamgraha

Samaṅgā (समङ्गा) refers to the medicinal plant known as “Mimosa pudica Linn.” and is dealt with in the 15th-century Yogasārasaṅgraha (Yogasara-saṅgraha) by Vāsudeva: an unpublished Keralite work representing an Ayurvedic compendium of medicinal recipes. The Yogasārasaṃgraha [mentioning samaṅgā] deals with entire recipes in the route of administration, and thus deals with the knowledge of pharmacy (bhaiṣajya-kalpanā) which is a branch of pharmacology (dravyaguṇa).

Ayurveda book cover
context information

Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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In Buddhism

Theravada (major branch of Buddhism)

Source: Pali Kanon: Pali Proper Names

1. The constant attendant of Tissa Buddha. Bu.xviii.21; BuA (p. 191) calls him Samata.

2. See Samagga.

context information

Theravāda is a major branch of Buddhism having the the Pali canon (tipitaka) as their canonical literature, which includes the vinaya-pitaka (monastic rules), the sutta-pitaka (Buddhist sermons) and the abhidhamma-pitaka (philosophy and psychology).

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Samaṅgā (समङ्गा).—Bengal madder (mañjiṣṭhā).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Samaṅgā (समङ्गा).—f.

(-ṅgā) 1. Bengal madder, (Rubia manjith.) 2. A sort of fern, (Lycopodium imbricatum.) 3. A sort of sensitive plant. E. sam together, agi to go or grow, aff. ac .

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Samaṅga (समङ्ग).—[adjective] having all limbs complete.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Śamāṅga (शमाङ्ग):—[from śama > śam] Name of two places, [Rājataraṅgiṇī]

2) Samaṅga (समङ्ग):—[=sam-aṅga] mf(ā)n. (See 2. sam) having all the limbs, complete, [Atharva-veda] (in, [Mahābhārata] applied to the mythical cow Bahulā)

3) [v.s. ...] m. a kind of game, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

4) [v.s. ...] Name of two men, [Mahābhārata]

5) [v.s. ...] ([plural]) of a people, [ib.]

6) Samaṅgā (समङ्गा):—[=sam-aṅgā] [from sam-aṅga] f. Name of various plants ([according to] to [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.] ‘Rubia Munjista and Cordifolia, Mimosa Pudica, Aloe Indica, etc.’), [Varāha-mihira’s Bṛhat-saṃhitā; Suśruta]

7) [v.s. ...] of a river, [Mahābhārata]

8) Sāmāṅga (सामाङ्ग):—[from sāma > sāman] n. an Aṅga or part of the S°-v°, [Nṛsiṃha-tāpanīya-upaniṣad]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Samaṅgā (समङ्गा):—[sama-ṅgā] (ṅgā) 1. f. Bengal madder; sort of fern; sensitive plant.

[Sanskrit to German] (Deutsch Wörterbuch)

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Böhtlingk and Roth Grosses Petersburger Wörterbuch

Samaṅga (समङ्ग):—(2. sam + aṅga)

1) adj. (f. ā) mit allen Gliedern versehen, vollständig [Atharvavedasaṃhitā 18, 4, 8.] als Beiw. der mythischen Kuh Bahulā [Mahābhārata 13, 3670. 6042.] —

2) m. Nomen proprium a) pl. eines Volkes [Mahābhārata 6, 368] [?(Viṣṇupurāṇa 193).] — b) zweier Männer [Mahābhārata 3, 14821. 12, 10533. fgg.] —

3) f. ā a) Bez. verschiedener Pflanzen: Krapp (mañjiṣṭhā), Rubia cordifolia [Amarakoṣa 2, 4, 3, 9.] [Bhāvaprakāśa 5.] = khadirī [Amarakoṣa 2, 4, 5, 7.] Mimosa pudica [Ratnamālā 244.] Lycopodium imbricatum (ein Moos) [Hindu System of Medicine 154.] = bālā [Rājanirghaṇṭa im Śabdakalpadruma] — [Suśruta 1, 59, 19. 133, 17. 141, 7. 2, 62, 13. 440, 6. 540, 7] (neben mañjiṣṭhā). [Varāhamihira’s Bṛhajjātaka S. 44, 9. 48, 39.] — b) Nomen proprium eines Flusses [Mahābhārata 3, 10689. fgg.] — Vgl. mahāsamaṅgā .

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Sāmāṅga (सामाङ्ग):—(2. sāman + 3. aṅga) n. Theil eines Sāman [NṚS. TĀP. Upakośā] in [Weber’s Indische Studien 9, 86.]

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Hindi dictionary

[«previous next»] — Samanga in Hindi glossary
Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

Samāṃga (समांग) [Also spelled samang]:—(a) homogeneous; sound; ~[] homogeneity; soundness.

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