Roma: 18 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Roma means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi, Hindi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

Alternative spellings of this word include Rom.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: JatLand: List of Mahabharata people and places

Roma (रोम) is a name mentioned in the Mahābhārata (cf. II.28.49, II.47.26) and represents one of the many proper names used for people and places. Note: The Mahābhārata (mentioning Roma) is a Sanskrit epic poem consisting of 100,000 ślokas (metrical verses) and is over 2000 years old.

Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Kavya (poetry)

Source: academia.edu: Bhoja’s Mechanical Garden

Roma is the name of an ancient kingdom mentioned in the 12th century Lokapaññati (“description of the world”), a Pali text from Burma.—[...] The Lokapaññati’s rendition of the story begins as a tale of two kingdoms: that of Pāṭaliputta (Sanskrit: Pātaliputra ) and the distant land of “Roma”. Roma, according to the story, was filled with makers of automata—what the text calls literally “machines that were the vehicles of spirits,” bhūtavāhanayanta, or mechanical beings animated by a kind of life force. In Roma, these machines carried out many functions, like commerce (buying and selling), agriculture, and protection. The secrets of this technology were fiercely guarded, and the machine-makers (yantakāras) of Roma were expected to report periodically to the royal court. If there was any prolonged absence, an automaton was sent to hunt down and kill the errant artisan, preventing the knowledge from spreading to other realms.

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Kavya (काव्य, kavya) refers to Sanskrit poetry, a popular ancient Indian tradition of literature. There have been many Sanskrit poets over the ages, hailing from ancient India and beyond. This topic includes mahakavya, or ‘epic poetry’ and natya, or ‘dramatic poetry’.

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In Buddhism

Theravada (major branch of Buddhism)

Source: Pali Kanon: Pali Proper Names

There were four kings of this name sixty thousand kappas ago, all previous births of Sataramsika Thera. Ap.i.104.

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Theravāda is a major branch of Buddhism having the the Pali canon (tipitaka) as their canonical literature, which includes the vinaya-pitaka (monastic rules), the sutta-pitaka (Buddhist sermons) and the abhidhamma-pitaka (philosophy and psychology).

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

roma : (nt.) hair on the body.

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Roma, (nt.) (Vedic roman; the usual P. form is loma (q. v.)) the hair of the body J. V, 430 (where in roma-rājiyā maṇḍita-udarā as explanation of loma-sundarī); Sdhp. 119 (°kūpa), (Page 577)

Pali book cover
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Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

rōma (रोम).—n (S) A hair of the body.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

rōma (रोम).—n A hair of the body.

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Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Roma (रोम).—A hole, cavity.

Derivable forms: romaḥ (रोमः).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Edgerton Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit Dictionary

Roma (रोम).—m. (otherwise only nt.), hair: n. pl. romāḥ Lalitavistara 310.1 (end of line of verse).

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Romā (रोमा).—name of a goddess: Mahāsamājasūtra Waldschmidt Kl. Sanskrit Texte 4, 185.15. Pali parallel has Rojā (supported by one Chin. version which points to reconstructed ro-ya; but another Chin. indicates so-ma).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Roma (रोम).—n.

(-maṃ) Water. m.

(-maḥ) A hole.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Roma (रोम).—n. Water.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Roma (रोम).—(—°) = rāman.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Roma (रोम):—1. roma m. (of uncertain derivation, but cf. 1. ropa) a hole, cavity, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

2) n. water, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

3) 2. roma m. the city Rome, [Catalogue(s)] (cf. bṛhad-roma and next)

4) [plural] Name of a people, [Viṣṇu-purāṇa]

5) a 3. 4. roma. See under 1. roman.

6) [from roman] 3. roma in [compound] for roman.

7) [from roman] 4. roma (ifc.) = roman (cf. a-dīrgha-, sa-r).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Roma (रोम):—(maṃ) 1. n. Water. m. A hole.

[Sanskrit to German]

Roma in German

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Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Hindi dictionary

Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

Roma (रोम) [Also spelled rom]:—(nm) (small and soft) hair (on the body); ~[kūpa] the pores on the surface of the skin; ~[guccha] cirri; ~[pūrṇa] hairy, lanate; ~[rājī] see [romālī; ~harṣaka] thrilling; awful, dreadful, terrible; ~[harṣaṇa] horripilation; -[roma meṃ] in the whole being, throughout the body; •[basanā] to pervade through the whole being; -[roma se] with heart and soul, with one’s whole being.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Rōma (ರೋಮ):—

1) [noun] the hair on the body of human beings and animals.

2) [noun] the feathers of a bird.

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Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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