Rekha, Rekhā: 22 definitions

Introduction:

Rekha means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit, Buddhism, Pali, the history of ancient India, Marathi, Hindi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

Alternative spellings of this word include Rekh.

In Hinduism

Natyashastra (theatrics and dramaturgy)

Source: archive.org: The mirror of gesture (abhinaya-darpana)

Rekhā is one of the saṃyutta-hastāni (Twenty-seven combined Hands).

Natyashastra book cover
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Natyashastra (नाट्यशास्त्र, nāṭyaśāstra) refers to both the ancient Indian tradition (śāstra) of performing arts, (nāṭya, e.g., theatrics, drama, dance, music), as well as the name of a Sanskrit work dealing with these subjects. It also teaches the rules for composing dramatic plays (nataka) and poetic works (kavya).

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Rasashastra (chemistry and alchemy)

Source: Wisdom Library: Rasa-śāstra

Rekhā (रेखा, “line/streak”):—One of the five ordinary defects (sādhāraṇa-doṣa) of the precious stones (ratna) according to rasaśāstra literature. This particular defect (doṣa) is referring to ‘lined appearance’. It is also know as the Resā (रेसा) doṣa, according to the Rasaprakāśasudhākara (Sanskrit work on the subject of rasaśāstra, or medicinal alchemy).

Rasashastra book cover
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Rasashastra (रसशास्त्र, rasaśāstra) is an important branch of Ayurveda, specialising in chemical interactions with herbs, metals and minerals. Some texts combine yogic and tantric practices with various alchemical operations. The ultimate goal of Rasashastra is not only to preserve and prolong life, but also to bestow wealth upon humankind.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Rekhā (रेखा) refers to a “line (of the palm)”, according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.3.8.—Accordingly, Sage Nārada said to Menā:—“O Menā, O king of mountains, this daughter of yours has all auspicious signs. Like the first digit of the moon she will increase day by day. She will delight her husband, and heighten the glory of her parents. She will be a great chaste lady. She will grant bliss to everyone always. I see all good signs in the palm of your daughter, O lord of mountains. There is an abnormal line [i.e., rekhā] also. Listen to the indication thereof. Her husband will be a naked Yogin, without any qualities. He will be free from lust. He will have neither mother nor father. He will be indifferent to honours. His dress and manners will be inauspicious”.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

Rekhā (रेखा).—A Śakti.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa IV. 36. 76.
Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Vyakarana (Sanskrit grammar)

Source: Wikisource: A dictionary of Sanskrit grammar

Rekhā (रेखा).—Termed also 'लेखा (lekhā) '; one of the subdivisions of the krama-pāțha.

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Vyakarana (व्याकरण, vyākaraṇa) refers to Sanskrit grammar and represents one of the six additional sciences (vedanga) to be studied along with the Vedas. Vyakarana concerns itself with the rules of Sanskrit grammar and linguistic analysis in order to establish the correct context of words and sentences.

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Vastushastra (architecture)

Source: OpenEdition books: Architectural terms contained in Ajitāgama and Rauravāgama

Rekhā (रेखा) refers to “line (stone defect) § 2.10.”.—(For paragraphs cf. Les enseignements architecturaux de l'Ajitāgama et du Rauravāgama by Bruno Dagens)

Vastushastra book cover
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Vastushastra (वास्तुशास्त्र, vāstuśāstra) refers to the ancient Indian science (shastra) of architecture (vastu), dealing with topics such architecture, sculpture, town-building, fort building and various other constructions. Vastu also deals with the philosophy of the architectural relation with the cosmic universe.

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

1) Rekhā (रेखा) refers to a “line” (e.g., a ‘straight line’—the awakened Kuṇḍalinī), according to the second recension of the Yogakhaṇḍa of the Manthānabhairavatantra, a vast sprawling work that belongs to a corpus of Tantric texts concerned with the worship of the goddess Kubjikā.—Accordingly, as Bhagavat (Viṣṇu) said to Śaṃkara: “O Śrīkaṇṭha! Great Rudra! You have come into being due to (this) drop of nectar. I am Kumārikā, Viṣṇu’s supreme energy, (the awakened Kuṇḍalinī whose form is like) a straight line [i.e., ṛju-rekhā]. O foolish one, you previously committed suicide due to (your) mistaken knowledge. You did not see (that) great body (mahāpiṇḍa) in the form of a Liṅga. I, Hari's energy, Mahālakṣmī, abide in your body. O Rudra, tell me the truth. Why have you taken refuge in me?”.

2) Rekhā (रेखा) refers to an “(auspicious) line (on the one’s foot)”, according to the Manthānabhairavatantra, a vast sprawling work that belongs to a corpus of Tantric texts concerned with the worship of the goddess Kubjikā.—Accordingly, while describing the signs of one who is a Siddha: “There is (an auspicious) line [i.e., rekhā] on his foot and (the lines) on his hand (are shaped) like an auspicious lotus. His shoulders are equal as are (his) teeth; his neck and breasts are upraised. Or else he may be bent over. Such a one is part of the Siddha lineage. (His) thigh is (strong as if) issuing from a wheel and he has a faint auspicious line of hair (on his belly). His gait is playful and his body well proportioned. Such is the mark of a Siddha”.

Shaktism book cover
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Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Jyotisha (astronomy and astrology)

Source: Wisdom Library: Brihat Samhita by Varahamihira

Rekhā (रेखा) refers to “lines” (appearing on the disc of the sun), according to the Bṛhatsaṃhitā (chapter 3), an encyclopedic Sanskrit work written by Varāhamihira mainly focusing on the science of ancient Indian astronomy astronomy (Jyotiṣa).—Accordingly, “If the sun should appear like a pot; he brings on hunger and death; if he should appear broken, the reigning prince dies; if without rays, mankind will be afflicted with fears; if like a gate, then the capital city, if like an umbrella then the country, will perish. If the sun should appear like a flag staff, or a bow, or quivering or of sharp rays he will bring on wars; if there should appear black lines [i.e., kṛṣṇa-rekhā] on his disc the reigning prince will die by the hand of his own minister”.

Jyotisha book cover
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Jyotisha (ज्योतिष, jyotiṣa or jyotish) refers to ‘astronomy’ or “Vedic astrology” and represents the fifth of the six Vedangas (additional sciences to be studied along with the Vedas). Jyotisha concerns itself with the study and prediction of the movements of celestial bodies, in order to calculate the auspicious time for rituals and ceremonies.

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In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

Source: The University of Sydney: A study of the Twelve Reflections

Rekhā (रेखा) refers to the “row” (of lotus feet), according to the 11th century Jñānārṇava, a treatise on Jain Yoga in roughly 2200 Sanskrit verses composed by Śubhacandra.—Accordingly, “The thirty gods, whose heads are bowed, bow down to the line of lotus feet [com.padakamala-rekhā—‘the row of lotus feet’] of those whose hearts have become a refuge only for the doctrine. That very same doctrine, which is devoted to the helpless, is a preceptor and a friend, and the doctrine is a master and a brother. It is a protector without a motive”.

Synonyms: Rājikā.

General definition book cover
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Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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India history and geography

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary

Rekhā.—(EI 19), a land measure. Cf. rekai, rekai-ppon (SITI), irekai; regarded as the name of a gold coin (probably bearing signs in straight lines); used in Vijayanagara inscriptions; probably, revenue income in cash. Note: rekhā is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

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Rekhā.—cf. rekai-ppon. Note: rekhā is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Rekhā, (f.) (fr. rikh, for which the Pāli form is likh, cp. Sk. rekhā, Lat. rīma, Ohg. rīga row) line, streak Abhp 539. See lekhā. (Page 576)

Pali book cover
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Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

rēkhā (रेखा).—f (S) A line. 2 A line drawn from Lanka to Meru, i. e. from the equator to the north pole; the first meridian.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

rēkhā (रेखा).—f A line. The first meridian.

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Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Rekhā (रेखा).—[likh-ac lasya]

1) A line, streak; मदरेखा, दानरेखा, रागरेखा (madarekhā, dānarekhā, rāgarekhā) &c.

2) The measure of a line, small portion, as much as a line; न रेखामात्रमपि व्यतीयुः (na rekhāmātramapi vyatīyuḥ) R.1.17.

3) A row, range, line, series; मुदाश्रु मोक्ष्यसे क्षिप्रं मेघरेखेव वार्षिकी (mudāśru mokṣyase kṣipraṃ megharekheva vārṣikī) Rām.2.44.27.

4) Delineation, sketch, drawing; लावण्यरेखया किंचिदन्वितम् (lāvaṇyarekhayā kiṃcidanvitam) Ś.6.13.

5) The first or prime meridian of the Indian astronomers drawn from Laṅkā to Meru and passing through Ujjayinī.

6) Fulness, satisfaction.

7) Deceit, fraud.

8) A straight position of all limbs in dancing.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Rekhā (रेखा).—f.

(-khā) 1. A line, a continuous line. 2. Deceit, fraud. 3. A little. 4. Fulness, satisfaction. 5. A small portion, a jot. 6. Drawing, delineating. 7. The prime meridian drawn from Ceylon to Meru through Ujjayini. E. See lekhā, the initial being changed to ra .

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Rekhā (रेखा).—i. e. likh + a, f. 1. A line, [Pañcatantra] ii. [distich] 183. 2. Drawing, [Śākuntala, (ed. Böhtlingk.)] [distich] 141. 3. A stripe, [Pañcatantra] i. [distich] 209. 4. A little, [Pañcatantra] ii. [distich] 148. 5. Fraud. 6. Fulness, satisfaction.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Rekhā (रेखा).—[feminine] streak, line ([rarely] rekha [masculine]); also = seq.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Rekha (रेख):—m. (mc. for rekhā, [from] √rikh = likh) a scratch, line, [Caurapañcāśikā]

2) Name of a man [gana] śivādi

3) Rekhā (रेखा):—[from rekha] a f. See below.

4) [from rekha] b f. a scratch, streak, stripe, line, [Gṛhyāsaṃgraha; Yājñavalkya; Mahābhārata] etc.

5) [v.s. ...] a continuous line, row, range, series, [Mahābhārata; Kāvya literature] etc.

6) [v.s. ...] the first or prime meridian (considered to be a line drawn from Laṅkā to Meru id est. from Ceylon [supposed to lie on the equator] to the north pole), [Sūryasiddhānta]

7) [v.s. ...] a right or straight position of all the limbs in dancing, [Saṃgīta-sārasaṃgraha]

8) [v.s. ...] delineation, outline, drawing, sketch, [Kāvya literature; Kathāsaritsāgara]

9) [v.s. ...] appearance (rekhayā ifc. under the app° of [Bālarāmāyaṇa]; rekhāṃ na-√labh, not to attain even to the app° of, not to be at all equal to, [Vikramāṅkadeva-carita, by Bilhaṇa])

10) [v.s. ...] deceit, fraud (= chadman), [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

11) [v.s. ...] fulness, satisfaction (= ābhoga), [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

12) [v.s. ...] a small quantity, little portion, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.] (cf. -mātram).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Rekhā (रेखा):—(khā) 1. f. A line; deceit; a little; fulness, satisfaction.

[Sanskrit to German]

Rekha in German

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Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Hindi dictionary

Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

1) Rekha (रेख) [Also spelled rekh]:—(nf) a line; mark; just-grown whiskers in early youth; -, [patthara kī] bound to be true/happen, a certain eventuality; —[ānā/bhīṃjanā/bhīganā/phūṭanā] whiskers to make their first appearance; —[khīṃcanā] to delimit; to aver; —[meṃ mekha māranā] to accomplish a very diffiult task, to accomplish an impossibility.

2) Rekhā (रेखा):—(nf) a line; lineament; mark; furrow; (~[eṃ] -pl.) lines on the palm of the hand—fate; destiny; ~[kāra] one who draws a line or demarcates; linear; ~[kṛti] a plan; sketch; liniature line-drawing; ~[gaṇita] geometry; ~[gaṇitīya] geometrical; ~[citra] a sketch; figure; line-drawing; ~[citraṇa] sketching; drawing a figure: ~[cchādana] hachure; ~[lekha] a diagram.

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