Rekha, Rekhā: 17 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Rekha means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Buddhism, Pali, the history of ancient India, Marathi, Hindi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

Alternative spellings of this word include Rekh.

In Hinduism

Natyashastra (theatrics and dramaturgy)

Source: archive.org: The mirror of gesture (abhinaya-darpana)

Rekhā is one of the saṃyutta-hastāni (Twenty-seven combined Hands).

Natyashastra book cover
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Natyashastra (नाट्यशास्त्र, nāṭyaśāstra) refers to both the ancient Indian tradition (śāstra) of performing arts, (nāṭya, e.g., theatrics, drama, dance, music), as well as the name of a Sanskrit work dealing with these subjects. It also teaches the rules for composing dramatic plays (nataka) and poetic works (kavya).

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Rasashastra (chemistry and alchemy)

Source: Wisdom Library: Rasa-śāstra

Rekhā (रेखा, “line/streak”):—One of the five ordinary defects (sādhāraṇa-doṣa) of the precious stones (ratna) according to rasaśāstra literature. This particular defect (doṣa) is referring to ‘lined appearance’. It is also know as the Resā (रेसा) doṣa, according to the Rasaprakāśasudhākara (Sanskrit work on the subject of rasaśāstra, or medicinal alchemy).

Rasashastra book cover
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Rasashastra (रसशास्त्र, rasaśāstra) is an important branch of Ayurveda, specialising in chemical interactions with herbs, metals and minerals. Some texts combine yogic and tantric practices with various alchemical operations. The ultimate goal of Rasashastra is not only to preserve and prolong life, but also to bestow wealth upon humankind.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

Rekhā (रेखा).—A Śakti.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa IV. 36. 76.
Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Vyakarana (Sanskrit grammar)

Source: Wikisource: A dictionary of Sanskrit grammar

Rekhā (रेखा).—Termed also 'लेखा (lekhā) '; one of the subdivisions of the krama-pāțha.

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Vyakarana (व्याकरण, vyākaraṇa) refers to Sanskrit grammar and represents one of the six additional sciences (vedanga) to be studied along with the Vedas. Vyakarana concerns itself with the rules of Sanskrit grammar and linguistic analysis in order to establish the correct context of words and sentences.

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Vastushastra (architecture)

Source: OpenEdition books: Architectural terms contained in Ajitāgama and Rauravāgama

Rekhā (रेखा) refers to “line (stone defect) § 2.10.”.—(For paragraphs cf. Les enseignements architecturaux de l'Ajitāgama et du Rauravāgama by Bruno Dagens)

Vastushastra book cover
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Vastushastra (वास्तुशास्त्र, vāstuśāstra) refers to the ancient Indian science (shastra) of architecture (vastu), dealing with topics such architecture, sculpture, town-building, fort building and various other constructions. Vastu also deals with the philosophy of the architectural relation with the cosmic universe.

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India history and geography

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary

Rekhā.—(EI 19), a land measure. Cf. rekai, rekai-ppon (SITI), irekai; regarded as the name of a gold coin (probably bearing signs in straight lines); used in Vijayanagara inscriptions; probably, revenue income in cash. Note: rekhā is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

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Rekhā.—cf. rekai-ppon. Note: rekhā is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Rekhā, (f.) (fr. rikh, for which the Pāli form is likh, cp. Sk. rekhā, Lat. rīma, Ohg. rīga row) line, streak Abhp 539. See lekhā. (Page 576)

Pali book cover
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Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

rēkhā (रेखा).—f (S) A line. 2 A line drawn from Lanka to Meru, i. e. from the equator to the north pole; the first meridian.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

rēkhā (रेखा).—f A line. The first meridian.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Rekhā (रेखा).—[likh-ac lasya]

1) A line, streak; मदरेखा, दानरेखा, रागरेखा (madarekhā, dānarekhā, rāgarekhā) &c.

2) The measure of a line, small portion, as much as a line; न रेखामात्रमपि व्यतीयुः (na rekhāmātramapi vyatīyuḥ) R.1.17.

3) A row, range, line, series; मुदाश्रु मोक्ष्यसे क्षिप्रं मेघरेखेव वार्षिकी (mudāśru mokṣyase kṣipraṃ megharekheva vārṣikī) Rām.2.44.27.

4) Delineation, sketch, drawing; लावण्यरेखया किंचिदन्वितम् (lāvaṇyarekhayā kiṃcidanvitam) Ś.6.13.

5) The first or prime meridian of the Indian astronomers drawn from Laṅkā to Meru and passing through Ujjayinī.

6) Fulness, satisfaction.

7) Deceit, fraud.

8) A straight position of all limbs in dancing.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Rekhā (रेखा).—f.

(-khā) 1. A line, a continuous line. 2. Deceit, fraud. 3. A little. 4. Fulness, satisfaction. 5. A small portion, a jot. 6. Drawing, delineating. 7. The prime meridian drawn from Ceylon to Meru through Ujjayini. E. See lekhā, the initial being changed to ra .

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Rekhā (रेखा).—i. e. likh + a, f. 1. A line, [Pañcatantra] ii. [distich] 183. 2. Drawing, [Śākuntala, (ed. Böhtlingk.)] [distich] 141. 3. A stripe, [Pañcatantra] i. [distich] 209. 4. A little, [Pañcatantra] ii. [distich] 148. 5. Fraud. 6. Fulness, satisfaction.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Rekhā (रेखा).—[feminine] streak, line ([rarely] rekha [masculine]); also = seq.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Rekha (रेख):—m. (mc. for rekhā, [from] √rikh = likh) a scratch, line, [Caurapañcāśikā]

2) Name of a man [gana] śivādi

3) Rekhā (रेखा):—[from rekha] a f. See below.

4) [from rekha] b f. a scratch, streak, stripe, line, [Gṛhyāsaṃgraha; Yājñavalkya; Mahābhārata] etc.

5) [v.s. ...] a continuous line, row, range, series, [Mahābhārata; Kāvya literature] etc.

6) [v.s. ...] the first or prime meridian (considered to be a line drawn from Laṅkā to Meru id est. from Ceylon [supposed to lie on the equator] to the north pole), [Sūryasiddhānta]

7) [v.s. ...] a right or straight position of all the limbs in dancing, [Saṃgīta-sārasaṃgraha]

8) [v.s. ...] delineation, outline, drawing, sketch, [Kāvya literature; Kathāsaritsāgara]

9) [v.s. ...] appearance (rekhayā ifc. under the app° of [Bālarāmāyaṇa]; rekhāṃ na-√labh, not to attain even to the app° of, not to be at all equal to, [Vikramāṅkadeva-carita, by Bilhaṇa])

10) [v.s. ...] deceit, fraud (= chadman), [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

11) [v.s. ...] fulness, satisfaction (= ābhoga), [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

12) [v.s. ...] a small quantity, little portion, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.] (cf. -mātram).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Rekhā (रेखा):—(khā) 1. f. A line; deceit; a little; fulness, satisfaction.

[Sanskrit to German] (Deutsch Wörterbuch)

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Böhtlingk and Roth Grosses Petersburger Wörterbuch

Rekha (रेख):—(von rikh)

1) m. a) = rekhā 1): alpendu [Caurapañcāśikā 7] in [Kāvya-Saṅgraha 228.] — b) Nomen proprium eines Mannes gaṇa śivādi zu [Pāṇini’s acht Bücher 4, 1, 112.] —

2) f. rekhā gaṇa bhidādi zu [Pāṇini’s acht Bücher 3, 3, 104.] [Vopadeva’s Grammatik 26, 191.] a) (ein geritzter) Streifen, Linie [Hemacandra’s Anekārthasaṃgraha 2, 24.] [Gṛhyasaṃgrahapariśiṣṭa 1, 52. fg.] [Yājñavalkya’s Gesetzbuch 2, 100.] mātramapi kṣuṇādā manorvartmanaḥ param . na vyatīyuḥ prajāstasya [Raghuvaṃśa 1, 17. 5, 44. 6, 55.] vyaktordhvarekhā bhṛkuṭīḥ [7, 55.] [Kumārasaṃbhava 7, 18.] [Śākuntala 14.] nyāsa [Spr. 1797.] tasya gaṇanāsu vittaṃ dattā rekhāpi mārjayati [5300.] rekhāḥ kurvan [Kathāsaritsāgara 30,107.] [WEBER, Rāmatāpanīya Upaniṣad 313.] [Rājataraṅgiṇī.5,101.] [Oxforder Handschriften 74,b,21. 23. fg.] [Halāyudha.2,386.] [Varāhamihira’s Bṛhajjātaka S. 3, 32.4, 15. 34,22. 53,42. 55. 100. 67,7.] auf der Handfläche [68, 43. fgg. 75. fgg. 69, 22. 70, 12. fgg.] ūrdhvarekhatalau (ūrdhvarekhā ed. Bomb.) pādau [Mahābhārata 5, 2331.] [Raghuvaṃśa 4, 88.] vidhātrā racitā rekhā lalāṭe kṣaramālikā [Spr. 2810.] trirekhā grīvā [Amarakoṣa 2, 6, 2, 39.] [Hemacandra’s Abhidhānacintāmaṇi 586.] trayāṅkitā grīvā [Halāyudha 2, 362.] hasta Linie auf der Handfläche [Kullūka] zu [Manu’s Gesetzbuch 9, 258.] bhāla [Caurapañcāśikā 7] in [Kāvya-Saṅgraha 228.] keśa [Varāhamihira’s Bṛhajjātaka S. 58, 13] añjana [Rājataraṅgiṇī 1, 208.] saṃdhyābhra [Spr. 3180, v. l.] bhasma [Trikāṇḍaśeṣa 2, 7, 15.] jala ein Streifen Wasser [Spr. 2245.] ein in Wasser. gezogener Strich [4065.] (vgl. jale rekhā [PAÑCAR. 1, 14, 83]). nikaṣe hemarekheva [Raghuvaṃśa 17, 46.] [Rāmāyaṇa 5, 11, 24.] candra [Mārkāṇḍeyapurāṇa 88, 15.] [Rāmāyaṇa 5, 11, 24. 18, 3. 20, 3.] dhūma [11, 24.] bāṇa eine von einem Pfeil herrührende lange Wunde ebend. mṛti eine den Tod anzeigende Linie [Daśakumāracarita 7, 13.] prathamaikarekhā so v. a. das Beste und Einzige in seiner Art: tāṃ kṣititale varakāminīnāṃ sarvāṅgasundaratayā prathamaikarekhām [Caurapañcāśikā 20.] — b) Zeichnung [Śākuntala 141. fg.] [Kathāsaritsāgara 122, 27.] khaḍgarekhāṃ lilekha [Spr. 2697.] — c) der erste Meridian [Sūryasiddhānta 1, 61.] — d) = ābhoga [Hemacandra’s Anekārthasaṃgraha] fulness, satisfaction [WILSON.] — e) = chadman Betrug, Verstellung. — f) ein Bischen [Hemacandra’s Anekārthasaṃgraha] — Vgl. kāma, pattra, padma, bindu, brahma, madana, madhya, megha, ratna, samarekha und lekha .

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Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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