Ratnavali, aka: Ratnāvali, Ratna-avali; 5 Definition(s)

Introduction

Ratnavali means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Natyashastra (theatrics and dramaturgy)

Ratnāvalī (रत्नावली) refers to “jewel-neckalce” and is classified as an ornament (ābharaṇa) for the neck (kaṇṭha) to be worn by females, according to Nāṭyaśāstra chapter 23. Such ornaments for females should be used in cases of human females and celestial beings (gods and goddesses).

Ābharaṇa (‘ornaments’, eg., ratnāvalī) is a category of alaṃkāra, or “decorations”, which in turn is a category of nepathya, or “costumes and make-up”, the perfection of which forms the main concern of the Āhāryābhinaya, or “extraneous representation”, a critical component for a successful dramatic play.

Source: Wisdom Library: Nāṭya-śāstra
Natyashastra book cover
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Natyashastra (नाट्यशास्त्र, nāṭyaśāstra) refers to both the ancient Indian tradition (śāstra) of performing arts, (nāṭya, e.g., theatrics, drama, dance, music), as well as the name of a Sanskrit work dealing with these subjects. It also teaches the rules for composing dramatic plays (nataka) and poetic works (kavya).

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Kavya (poetry)

Ratnavali in Kavya glossary... « previous · [R] · next »

Ratnāvalī (रत्नावली) is the name a locality mentioned in Rājaśekhara’s 10th-century Kāvyamīmāṃsā.—A city on the southern ranges of the Malaya Mountain.

Source: Shodhganga: The Kavyamimamsa of Rajasekhara
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Kavya (काव्य, kavya) refers to Sanskrit poetry, a popular ancient Indian tradition of literature. There have been many Sanskrit poets over the ages, hailing from ancient India and beyond. This topic includes mahakavya, or ‘epic poetry’ and natya, or ‘dramatic poetry’.

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Katha (narrative stories)

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Ratnāvalī (रत्नावली) is the daughter of a merchant from Candanapura, as mentioned in the third story of the Vetālapañcaviṃśati in the Kathāsaritsāgara, chapter 77. Accordingly, “... and finding out that he was of good birth, entertained him, and adopted him as a protégé. And he gave him his daughter Ratnāvalī, with a dower, and thenceforth Dhanadatta lived in his father-in-law’s house”.

The story of Ratnāvalī is mentioned in the Vetālapañcaviṃśati (twenty-five tales of a vetāla) which is embedded in the twelfth book of the Kathāsaritsāgara (‘ocean of streams of story’). The main book is a famous Sanskrit epic detailing the exploits of prince Naravāhanadatta in his quest to become the emperor of the vidyādharas (celestial beings). The Kathā-sarit-sāgara is is explained to be an adaptation of Guṇāḍhya’s Bṛhatkathā which consisted of 100,000 verses and in turn forms part of an even larger work containing 700,000 verses.

Source: Wisdom Library: Kathāsaritsāgara
Katha book cover
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Katha (कथा, kathā) refers to narrative Sanskrit literature often inspired from epic legendry (itihasa) and poetry (mahākāvya). Some Kathas reflect socio-political instructions for the King while others remind the reader of important historical event and exploits of the Gods, Heroes and Sages.

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In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

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Ratnāvali (रत्नावलि) is the shorter name of Ratnāvalidvīpa, one of the continents (dvīpa) of the middle-world (madhyaloka) which is encircled by the ocean named Ratnāvalisasamudra (or simply Ratnāvali), according to Jain cosmology. The middle-world contains innumerable concentric dvīpas and, as opposed to the upper-world (adhaloka) and the lower-world (ūrdhvaloka), is the only world where humans can be born.

Ratnāvali is recorded in ancient Jaina canonical texts dealing with cosmology and geography of the universe. Examples of such texts are the Saṃgrahaṇīratna in the Śvetāmbara tradition or the Tiloyapannatti and the Trilokasāra in the Digambara tradition.

Source: Wisdom Library: Jainism
General definition book cover
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Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit-English dictionary

Ratnavali in Sanskrit glossary... « previous · [R] · next »

Ratnāvalī (रत्नावली).—

1) a necklace of jewels.

2) Name of a Nāṭikā attributed to Śrīharṣa.

Ratnāvalī is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms ratna and āvalī (आवली).

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary
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Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Relevant definitions

Search found 361 related definition(s) that might help you understand this better. Below you will find the 15 most relevant articles:

Ratna
Ratna (रत्न) refers to “ruby” and represents a kind of precious stone (gem) used for the making...
Ratnakara
1) Ratnākara (रत्नाकर) is the name of an ancient city, according to the Kathāsaritsāgara, chapt...
Ratnaprabha
Ratnaprabhā (रत्नप्रभा).—f. (-bhā) The first of the seven hells or purgatories, according to th...
Avali
Āvali (आवलि) refers to a unit of time according to the 2nd-century Tattvārthasūtra 5.40.—What i...
Saptaratna
Saptaratna (सप्तरत्न) refers to the seven jewels of a Cakravartin, as mentioned in the Kathāsar...
Ekavali
Ekāvalī (एकावली).—f. (-lī) A single string of beads, flowers, &c. E. eka and āvalī a row.
Dipavali
Dīpāvalī.—(EI 5; CII 4), name of a festival; the festival of lights; cf. dīpa-utsava. Note: dīp...
Navaratna
Nava-ratna.—(BL), the nine gems at Vikramāditya's court. Note: nava-ratna is defined in the “In...
Vamshavali
Vaṃśāvalī (वंशावली).—f. (-lī) A pedigree, a genealogy. E. vaṃśa, and āvalī a line.
Striratna
Strīratna (स्त्रीरत्न).—1) an excellent woman; स्त्रीरत्नेषु ममोर्वशी प्रियतमा यूथे तवेयं वशा ...
Triratna
Triratna (त्रिरत्न).—nt. (= ratna-traya, q.v., and see ratna 1), the ‘three jewels’: °nāt AsP 1...
Muktavali
Muktāvali (मुक्तावलि) or Muktāvalī (मुक्तावली).—f., Derivable forms: muktāvaliḥ (मुक्तावलिः).Mu...
Ratnakuta
Ratnakūṭa (रत्नकूट) is the name of an island to which Śaktideva and Satyavrata traveled to acco...
Pancaratna
Pañca-ratna.—(EI 19), a group of five stanzas. Note: pañca-ratna is defined in the “Indian epig...
Ratnadhenu
Ratna-dhenu.—(EI 13, 16, 24), name of a mahādāna. Note: ratna-dhenu is defined in the “Indian e...

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