Ratipriya, Ratipriyā, Rati-priya: 6 definitions

Introduction

Ratipriya means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous (R) next»] — Ratipriya in Purana glossary
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

Ratipriyā (रतिप्रिया).—The goddess enshrined at Gangādvāra.*

  • * Matsya-purāṇa 13. 37.
Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

[«previous (R) next»] — Ratipriya in Shaivism glossary
Source: academia.edu: Yakṣiṇī-sādhana in the Kakṣapuṭa tantra

Ratipriyā (रतिप्रिया) is the name of one of the thirty-two Yakṣiṇīs mentioned in the Kakṣapuṭatantra, as well as one of the thirty-six Yakṣiṇīs mentioned in the Uḍḍāmareśvaratantra. In the yakṣiṇī-sādhana, the Yakṣiṇī is regarded as the guardian spirit who provides worldly benefits to the practitioner. The Yakṣiṇī (eg., Ratipriyā) provides, inter alia, daily food, clothing and money, tells the future, and bestows a long life, but she seldom becomes a partner in sexual practices.

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Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

[«previous (R) next»] — Ratipriya in Jainism glossary
Source: Wisdom Library: Jainism

Ratipriya (रतिप्रिय) refers to a class of kinnara deities according to both the Digambara and Śvetāmbara traditions. The kinnaras refer to a category of vyantaras gods which represents one of the four classes of celestial beings (devas). The kinnaras are black in complexion and their caitya-vṛkṣas (sacred-tree) is Aśoka according to both traditions.

The deities such as Ratipriyas are defined in ancient Jain cosmological texts such as the Saṃgrahaṇīratna in the Śvetāmbara tradition or the Tiloyapaṇṇati by Yativṛṣabha (5th century) in the Digambara tradition.

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Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit-English dictionary

[«previous (R) next»] — Ratipriya in Sanskrit glossary
Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Ratipriya (रतिप्रिय).—the god of love; अपि नाम मनागवतीर्णोऽसि रतिरमणबाणगोचरम् (api nāma manāgavatīrṇo'si ratiramaṇabāṇagocaram) Māl.1; दधति स्फुटं रतिपतेरिषवः शिततां यदुत्पलपलाशदृशः (dadhati sphuṭaṃ ratipateriṣavaḥ śitatāṃ yadutpalapalāśadṛśaḥ) Śi.9.66; पूर्वं यत्र समं त्वया रतिपतेरासादिताः सिद्धयः (pūrvaṃ yatra samaṃ tvayā ratipaterāsāditāḥ siddhayaḥ) Gīt.

Derivable forms: ratipriyaḥ (रतिप्रियः).

Ratipriya is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms rati and priya (प्रिय). See also (synonyms): ratipati, ratiramaṇa.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Ratipriya (रतिप्रिय).—m.

(-yaḥ) Kamadeva. E. rati the wife of the deity, and priya beloved.

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Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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