Rathasaptami, Ratha-saptami: 10 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Rathasaptami means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous next»] — Rathasaptami in Purana glossary
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

Rathasaptami (रथसप्तमि).—The Saptami of the month of Māgha when the sun turns his chariot; fit for making gifts and performing śrāddha to please Pitṛs.*

  • * Matsya-purāṇa 17. 9-10.
Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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India history and geography

Source: archive.org: South Indian Festivities

Ratha-saptami.—The Hindu festival going by the name ‘Ratha-saptami’ is observed on the seventh day of the bright fortnight in the month of Magha, called also in Tamil ‘Tai Masam’, corresponding to the English month January–February when the sun is in the Makara. Different names have also been bestowed on the festival in question. Some call it ‘Magha-saptami’ deriving the name from the month in which it is considered auspicious.

The word saptami is derived from the Sanskrit word ‘sapta’ which means seven, and consequently the expression ‘Magha-saptami’ is taken to mean the seventh ‘tithi’ or the day after the ‘purnima’ (full-moon) or the ‘amavasya’ (new-moon) in the month of Magha. Here it is the seventh day in the bright fortnight in the said month.

Some people call it Jayanti-saptami and others Maha-saptami. The expression Jayanti-saptami means the victorious seventh day after the full-moon day and that going by the name ‘Maha-saptami’ means ‘the great seventh day’ in the fortnight. The name Jaya-saptami originated perhaps from the belief that the observance of this festival brought success in all undertakings and the other, Maha-saptami, from the importance attached to this saptami of all the saptamis in the year, as specially auspicious.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary

Ratha-saptamī.—(EI 22; CII 4; IA 17), an auspicious tithi; same as Māgha śu-di 7. Note: ratha-saptamī is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

[«previous next»] — Rathasaptami in Marathi glossary
Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

rathasaptamī (रथसप्तमी).—f (S) The seventh day of the bright half of māgha.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

rathasaptamī (रथसप्तमी).—f The seventh day of the bright half of māgha.

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Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

[«previous next»] — Rathasaptami in Sanskrit glossary
Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Rathasaptamī (रथसप्तमी).—the seventh day in the bright half of Māgha.

Rathasaptamī is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms ratha and saptamī (सप्तमी).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Aufrecht Catalogus Catalogorum

Rathasaptamī (रथसप्तमी) as mentioned in Aufrecht’s Catalogus Catalogorum:—from the Vratārka. L.. 535.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Rathasaptamī (रथसप्तमी):—[=ratha-saptamī] [from ratha] f. Name of the 7th day in the light half of the month Āśvina (so called as the beginning of a Manv-antara when a new Sun ascended his car), [Horace H. Wilson]

[Sanskrit to German]

Rathasaptami in German

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Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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