Rasika, Rāsika, Rashika: 18 definitions

Introduction:

Rasika means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi, Hindi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

Alternative spellings of this word include Rasik.

In Hinduism

Vaishnavism (Vaishava dharma)

Source: Pure Bhakti: Bhajana-rahasya - 2nd Edition

Rasika (रसिक) refers to:—One who is expert at relishing rasa; a connoisseur of rasa. (cf. Glossary page from Bhajana-Rahasya).

Source: Pure Bhakti: Brhad Bhagavatamrtam

Rasika (रसिक) refers to:—One who is expert in relishing bhakti-rasa within his heart, which is resplendent with transcendence, or śuddha-sattva. (cf. Glossary page from Śrī Bṛhad-bhāgavatāmṛta).

Vaishnavism book cover
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Vaishnava (वैष्णव, vaiṣṇava) or vaishnavism (vaiṣṇavism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshipping Vishnu as the supreme Lord. Similar to the Shaktism and Shaivism traditions, Vaishnavism also developed as an individual movement, famous for its exposition of the dashavatara (‘ten avatars of Vishnu’).

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Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: Shodhganga: Portrayal of Animal Kingdom (Tiryaks) in Epics An Analytical study

1) Rasika (रसिक) (lit. “one who has a humerous mind”) is a synonym (another name) for the Elephant (Gaja), according to scientific texts such as the Mṛgapakṣiśāstra (Mriga-pakshi-shastra) or “the ancient Indian science of animals and birds” by Hamsadeva, containing the varieties and descriptions of the animals and birds seen in the Sanskrit Epics such as the Ramayana and Mahabharata.

2) Rasika (रसिक) (lit. “one who is elegant”) also refers to the Horse (Aśva).

3) Rasika (रसिक) (lit. “one who is elegant”) also refers to the Sārasa.

Ayurveda book cover
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Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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In Buddhism

Tibetan Buddhism (Vajrayana or tantric Buddhism)

Source: Wisdom Library: Tibetan Buddhism

Rāśika (राशिक) is the name of a Śrāvaka mentioned as attending the teachings in the 6th century Mañjuśrīmūlakalpa: one of the largest Kriyā Tantras devoted to Mañjuśrī (the Bodhisattva of wisdom) representing an encyclopedia of knowledge primarily concerned with ritualistic elements in Buddhism. The teachings in this text originate from Mañjuśrī and were taught to and by Buddha Śākyamuni in the presence of a large audience (including Rāśika).

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Tibetan Buddhism includes schools such as Nyingma, Kadampa, Kagyu and Gelug. Their primary canon of literature is divided in two broad categories: The Kangyur, which consists of Buddha’s words, and the Tengyur, which includes commentaries from various sources. Esotericism and tantra techniques (vajrayāna) are collected indepently.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Rāsika, (nt.) (fr. rāsi) revenue, fisc D. I, 135. (Page 571)

Pali book cover
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Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

raśīka (रशीक).—a Properly rasika.

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rasika (रसिक).—a (S) Savory, sapid, tasty, having flavor or taste. 2 fig. Tasteful, sharp, salty--a poem, a speech. 3 That has taste or intellectual relish. 4 Sentimental. 5 Humorous, jocular, facetious, witty.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

rasika (रसिक).—a Savoury; tasteful. Sentimental. Witty.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Rasika (रसिक).—a. [raso'styasya ṭhan]

1) Savoury, sapid, tasteful.

2) Graceful, elegant, beautiful.

3) Impassioned.

4) Apprehending flavour or excellence, possessed of taste, appreciative, discriminating; तद् वृत्तं प्रवदन्ति काव्यरसिकाः शार्दूलविक्रीडितम् (tad vṛttaṃ pravadanti kāvyarasikāḥ śārdūlavikrīḍitam) Śrut.4.

5) Finding pleasure or taking delight in, delighting in, devoted to (usually in comp.); इयं मालती भगवता सदृशसंयोगरसिकेन वेधसा मन्मथेन मया च तुभ्यं दीयते (iyaṃ mālatī bhagavatā sadṛśasaṃyogarasikena vedhasā manmathena mayā ca tubhyaṃ dīyate) Mālatīmādhava (Bombay) 6; so कामरसिकः (kāmarasikaḥ) Bhartṛhari 3.112; परोपकाररसिकस्य (paropakārarasikasya) Mṛcchakaṭika 6.19.

6) Humorous, witty.

7) Fanciful.

8) Lustful.

-kaḥ 1 A man of taste or feeling, an appreciator of excellence or beauty; cf. अरसिक (arasika).

2) A libertine.

3) An elephant.

4) A horse.

5) The Sārasa bird.

-kā 1 The juice of sugar-cane, molasses.

2) The tongue.

3) A woman;s girdle; see रसाला (rasālā) also.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Rasika (रसिक).—mfn.

(-kaḥ-kā-kī-kaṃ) 1. Flavoured, having taste or flavour. 2. Tasteful, as a composition, &c. 3. Having a taste for poetry, &c. 4. Sentimental. 5. Impassioned. m.

(-kaḥ) 1. A horse. 2. An elephant. 3. A libertine. f.

(-kā) 1. Curds mixed with sugar and spice. 2. Molasses, the juice of the sugar-cane. 3. The tongue. 4. A woman’s zone or girdle. E. rasa flavour, sentiment, and ṭhan aff.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Rasika (रसिक).—i. e. rasa + ika, I. adj. 1. Having taste, flavoured. 2. Tasteful, as a composition. 3. Impassioned, inclined, [Hitopadeśa] 103, 3 (sāhasa-eka-, Inclined only to inconsiderate haste). Ii. m. 1. A horse. 2. An elephant. 3. A libertine. Iii. f. (cf. rasana). 1. A woman’s girdle. 2. The tongue. 3. Curds with sugar and spice. 4. Molasses.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Rasika (रसिक).—[adjective] having (good) taste; having a liking for, be fond of or familiar with ([locative] or —°); tasteful, elegant. Abstr. [feminine], tva [neuter]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Rasika (रसिक):—[from ras] mf(ā)n. tasteful, elegant, [Bhartṛhari]

2) [v.s. ...] having a discriminating taste, aesthetic, [Kāvya literature; Kathāsaritsāgara]

3) [v.s. ...] having a taste for or a sense of, fond of, devoted to, delighting in ([locative case] or [compound]), [ib.; Rājataraṅgiṇī; Sāhitya-darpaṇa]

4) [v.s. ...] sentimental, [Horace H. Wilson]

5) [v.s. ...] fanciful, [Monier-Williams’ Sanskrit-English Dictionary]

6) [v.s. ...] lustful, [ib.]

7) [v.s. ...] m. a man full of taste or feeling (cf. a-r)

8) [v.s. ...] a libertine, [Horace H. Wilson]

9) [v.s. ...] Ardea Sibirica, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

10) [v.s. ...] a horse, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

11) [v.s. ...] an elephant, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

12) [v.s. ...] unboiled juice of sugar-cane, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

13) Rasikā (रसिका):—[from rasika > ras] a f. See below.

14) [from ras] b f. an emotional wife (cf. [compound])

15) [v.s. ...] the juice of sugar-cane, molasses, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

16) [v.s. ...] curds with sugar and spice, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

17) [v.s. ...] chyle, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

18) [v.s. ...] the tongue, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

19) [v.s. ...] a woman’s girdle, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.] (cf. raśanā).

20) Rāśika (राशिक):—[from rāśi] mfn. (ifc. after a numeral) consisting of a [particular] sum or number of quantities, [Colebrooke] (cf. rāśi).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Rasika (रसिक):—[(kaḥ-kā-ko-kaṃ) n.] Flavoured, tasteful; sentimental. m. A horse; an elephant; a libertine. f. Spiced curds; molasses; woman’s girdle; tongue.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Rasika (रसिक) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit words: Rasia, Rasiā.

[Sanskrit to German]

Rasika in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Hindi dictionary

Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

Rasika (रसिक) [Also spelled rasik]:—(a and nm) a man of taste, one having aesthetic sense, one who appreciates beauty or excellence; an amorist; dilettante; hence ~[] (nf).

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Raśika (ರಶಿಕ):—[noun] the tree Ougeinia oojeinensis ( = O. dalbergioides, = Dalbergiaougeinensis) of Papilionaceae family; chariot tree.

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Rasika (ರಸಿಕ):—

1) [adjective] tasty; delicious.

2) [adjective] joking; humorous; full of fun.

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Rasika (ರಸಿಕ):—

1) [noun] a man who has expert knowledge and keen discrimination in some field, in the fine arts or in matters of taste; a man highly sensitive to art and beauty.

2) [noun] a man given to sensual, erotic life.

3) [noun] a secret; a mystery.

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Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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