Ramana, Ramaṇa, Ramaṇā, Rāmaṇa, Ramanā: 22 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Ramana means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi, Hindi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

Alternative spellings of this word include Ramna.

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In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopedia

1) Ramana (रमन).—A son born to the Vasu known as Soma of his wife Manoharā. (Ādi Parva, Chapter 66, Verse 22).

2) Ramaṇa (रमण).—(RAMAṆAKAM). An island near Dvārakā where, according to Chapter 38 of the Southern Text of Bhārata, there was a forest. It was in this island that Vinatā, mother of Garuḍa and Kadrū, mother of the nāgas lived. Garuḍa, after freeing his mother from her slavery evicted the nāgas from this island. (Brahmāṇḍa Purāṇa, Chapter 17). Following the eviction, many of the prominent nāgas lived in Pātāla. But, Kāliya, in fear of Garuḍa, lived in Kālindī. After his suppression by Śrī Kṛṣṇa Kāliya, with his family, as advised by Kṛṣṇa returned to Ramaṇakam. (Bhāgavata, 10th Skandha).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

1) Ramaṇa (रमण).—A son of Dhara.*

  • * Matsya-purāṇa 5. 24.

2) Ramaṇā (रमणा).—The Goddess enshrined at Rāmatīrtha.*

  • * Matsya-purāṇa 13. 40.

3) Rāmaṇa (रामण).—A son of Sāraṇa.*

  • * Vāyu-purāṇa 96. 165.
Source: JatLand: List of Mahabharata people and places

Ramaṇa (रमण) is a name mentioned in the Mahābhārata (cf. I.60.20) and represents one of the many proper names used for people and places. Note: The Mahābhārata (mentioning Ramaṇa) is a Sanskrit epic poem consisting of 100,000 ślokas (metrical verses) and is over 2000 years old.

Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Source: Wisdom Library: Śaivism

Ramaṇa (रमण) refers to one of the seven regions (navakhaṇḍa) situated within Jambūdvīpa, according to Parākhyatantra 5.61. It is also known as Ramaṇakhaṇḍa. Jambūdvīpa is one of the seven continents situated within the world of the earth (pṛthivī). These continents are located above the seven pātālas and may contain even more sub-continents within them, are round in shape, and are encircled within seven concentric oceans.

According to the Parākhyatantra, “beyond that is the landmass of Ramaṇa, of the same dimensions as the landmass of Ramya, where Ramaṇa was forcibly ravished by the foremost of the Gandharvas”.

In the middle of these nine regions (e.g., Ramaṇa) is situated the golden mountain named Meru which rises above the surface of the earth by 84,000 yojanas while it penetrates the circle of the earth to a depth of sixteen yojanas.

The Parākhyatantra is an old Śaiva-siddhānta tantra dating from before the 10th century.

Shaivism book cover
context information

Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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Chandas (prosody, study of Sanskrit metres)

Source: Shodhganga: a concise history of Sanskrit Chanda literature

Ramaṇa (रमण) refers to one of the 130 varṇavṛttas (syllabo-quantitative verse) dealt with in the second chapter of the Vṛttamuktāvalī, ascribed to Durgādatta (19th century), author of eight Sanskrit work and patronised by Hindupati: an ancient king of the Bundela tribe (presently Bundelkhand of Uttar Pradesh). A Varṇavṛtta (e.g., ramaṇa) refers to a type of classical Sanskrit metre depending on syllable count where the light-heavy patterns are fixed.

Chandas book cover
context information

Chandas (छन्दस्) refers to Sanskrit prosody and represents one of the six Vedangas (auxiliary disciplines belonging to the study of the Vedas). The science of prosody (chandas-shastra) focusses on the study of the poetic meters such as the commonly known twenty-six metres mentioned by Pingalas.

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Vedanta (school of philosophy)

Source: Shodhganga: Siva Gita A Critical Study

Ramaṇa (रमण) or Ramaṇagītā refers to one of the sixty-four Gītās commonly referred to in Hindu scriptures.—Gītā is the name given to certain sacred writings in verse (often in the form of a dialogue) which are devoted to the exposition of particular religious and theosophical doctrines. Most of these Gītās [i.e., Ramaṇa-gītā] originate from the Mahābhārata or the various Purāṇas.

context information

Vedanta (वेदान्त, vedānta) refers to a school of orthodox Hindu philosophy (astika), drawing its subject-matter from the Upanishads. There are a number of sub-schools of Vedanta, however all of them expound on the basic teaching of the ultimate reality (brahman) and liberation (moksha) of the individual soul (atman).

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Kavya (poetry)

Source: Shodhganga: Bhismacaritam a critical study

Ramaṇā (रमणा) is the name of a Sanskrit metre (chandas) [defined as वं.इ.वं.वं] of the Vaṃśastha type as employed in the Bhīṣmacarita (Bhishma Charitra) which is a mahākāvya (‘epic poem’) written by Hari Narayan Dikshit.—We find sixteen examples of Ramaṇā variety of Vaṃśastha metre in the Bhīṣmacarita. The example of it is verse XV.31. [...] The other examples are as follows: XVI.11, XVI.13, XVI.47, XVII.9, XVII.11, XVIII.10, XVIII.24, XVIII.27, XIX.12, XIX.18, XIX.34, XIX.45, XX.14, XX.24 and XX.29.

context information

Kavya (काव्य, kavya) refers to Sanskrit poetry, a popular ancient Indian tradition of literature. There have been many Sanskrit poets over the ages, hailing from ancient India and beyond. This topic includes mahakavya, or ‘epic poetry’ and natya, or ‘dramatic poetry’.

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In Buddhism

Theravada (major branch of Buddhism)

Source: Pali Kanon: Pali Proper Names

The Pali name for the inhabitants of Ramanna. Cv.lxxvi.66.

context information

Theravāda is a major branch of Buddhism having the the Pali canon (tipitaka) as their canonical literature, which includes the vinaya-pitaka (monastic rules), the sutta-pitaka (Buddhist sermons) and the abhidhamma-pitaka (philosophy and psychology).

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

ramana : (nt.) enjoyment. || ramāna (pr.p. of ramati) delighting in; enjoying oneself.

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Ramaṇa, (adj.) (fr. ramati; cp. Sk. ramaṇa) pleasing, charming, delightful DhA. II, 202 (°ṭṭhāna). (Page 565)

Pali book cover
context information

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

ramaṇa (रमण).—n (S) Roaming or roving for pleasure; sporting, playing, delighting one's self. 2 Coition. 3 m A husband, lover, gallant, sweetheart.

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ramaṇā (रमणा).—m (ramaṇa) A pleasure-ground; a park; public gardens or a garden &c. 2 An enclosure for gathering Brahmans to receive dakṣiṇā. 3 The distribution there of dakṣiṇā.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

ramaṇa (रमण).—n Sporting one's self. m A husband, lover.

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ramaṇā (रमणा).—m A pleasure-ground; a park. A large gathering, as of brāmhaṇa to a dinner.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Ramaṇa (रमण).—a. (-ṇī f.) [रमयति-रम्-णिच् ल्यु ल्युट् वा (ramayati-ram-ṇic lyu lyuṭ vā)] Pleasing, gratifying, delightful, charming; नन्दनानि मुनीन्द्राणां रमणानि वनौकसाम् (nandanāni munīndrāṇāṃ ramaṇāni vanaukasām) Bk.6.72; Bhāg.5.7.12.

-ṇaḥ 1 A lover, husband; प्रायेणैते रमणविरहेष्वङ्गनानां विनोदाः (prāyeṇaite ramaṇaviraheṣvaṅganānāṃ vinodāḥ) Me. 89,39; पप्रच्छ रामां रमणोऽभिलाषम् (papraccha rāmāṃ ramaṇo'bhilāṣam) R.14.27; Ku.4. 21; Śi.9.6.

2) The god of love.

3) Name of Aruṇa.

4) An ass.

5) A testicle.

-ṇam 1 Sporting.

2) Dalliance, pastime, amorous sport.

3) Love, sexual union.

4) Joy or pleasure in general.

5) The hip and the loins.

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Ramaṇā (रमणा).—

1) A wife, mistress.

2) A lovely woman.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Edgerton Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit Dictionary

Ramaṇa (रमण).—nt., = next: Divyāvadāna 599.24 (prose).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Ramaṇa (रमण).—mfn.

(-ṇaḥ-ṇā-ṇaṃ) Causing pleasure, pleasing, charming, delightful. n.

(-ṇaṃ) 1. Sporting, playing. 2. Dalliance, amorous sport. 3. Coition, copulation. 4. The mons veneris. 5. A sort of cucumber. 6. The hip and the loins. m.

(-ṇaḥ) 1. A name of Kama. or love. 2. A husband. 3. A lover, a gallant. 4. An ass. 5. A testicle. f. (ṇā or ṇī) 1. A woman, or an agreeable woman, a wife, a mistress, &c. 2. A kind of metre, having eleven syllables in the first and third, and twelve in the second and fourth Padas of every stanza. E. ram to sport, yuc or lya ṭa aff., fem. aff., ṭāp or ṅīṣ .

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Ramaṇa (रमण).—i. e. ram + ana, I. adj. Delighting, [Bhāgavata-Purāṇa, (ed. Burnouf.)] 5, 7, 11. Ii. m. 1. A husband, [Meghadūta, (ed. Gildemeister.)] 85. 2. A lover, [Vikramorvaśī, (ed. Bollensen.)] [distich] 89; [Pañcatantra] i. [distich] 196; [Śiśupālavadha] 9, 60. 3. A name of Kāma. 4. An ass. Iii. f. ṇī, and ṇā, A wife, a mistress. Iv. n. 1. Sporting. 2. Dalliance, love, [Meghadūta, (ed. Gildemeister.)] 38. 3. Coition. 4. The mons veneris.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Ramaṇa (रमण).—[feminine] ī = rama adj.

— [masculine] lover, husband; [feminine] ī mistress, wife, [Name] of a serpentmaid; [neuter] joy, pleasure, [especially] sensual pleasure, sexual intercourse.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Ramaṇa (रमण):—[from ram] mf(ī)n. pleasing, charming, delightful, [Bhāgavata-purāṇa]

2) [v.s. ...] m. a lover, husband (cf. kṣapā-r), [Mahābhārata; Kāvya literature] etc.

3) [v.s. ...] Kāma-deva, the god of love, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

4) [v.s. ...] an ass, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

5) [v.s. ...] a testicle, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

6) [v.s. ...] a tree similar to the Melia Bukayun, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

7) [v.s. ...] = tinduka, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

8) [v.s. ...] Name of Aruṇa or the charioteer of the Sun, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

9) [v.s. ...] of a mythical son of Manoharā, [Mahābhārata; Harivaṃśa]

10) [v.s. ...] of a man, [Pravara texts]

11) [v.s. ...] [plural] Name of a people (cf. ramaṭha), [Mahābhārata]

12) Ramaṇā (रमणा):—[from ramaṇa > ram] f. a charming woman, wife, mistress, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

13) [v.s. ...] a kind of metre, [Colebrooke]

14) [v.s. ...] Name of Dākṣāyaṇī in Rāma-tīrtha, [Catalogue(s)]

15) Ramaṇa (रमण):—[from ram] n. pleasure, joy, [Subhāṣitāvali]

16) [v.s. ...] dalliance, amorous sport, sexual union, copulation, [Nirukta, by Yāska; Śukasaptati]

17) [v.s. ...] decoying (of deer), [Śiśupāla-vadha vi, 9] (cf. [Patañjali on Pāṇini 6-4, 24], [vArttika] 3)

18) [v.s. ...] (ifc.) gladdening, delighting, [Bhāgavata-purāṇa]

19) [v.s. ...] the hinder parts, pudenda (= jaghana), [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

20) [v.s. ...] the root of Trichosanthes Dioeca, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

21) [v.s. ...] Name of a forest, [Harivaṃśa]

22) [v.s. ...] of a town, [Divyāvadāna]

23) Rāmaṇa (रामण):—[from rāma] m. Diospyros Embryopteris, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.] ([varia lectio] ramaṇa)

24) [v.s. ...] a tree resembling the Melia Bukayun, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

25) Rāmaṇā (रामणा):—[from rāmaṇa > rāma] f. Name of an Apsaras, [Rāmāyaṇa] ([varia lectio] vāmanā).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Ramaṇa (रमण):—[(naḥ-ṇā-ṇaṃ) a.] Pleasing. m. Kāma; a husband; a lover; an ass. f. (ṇā-ṇī) A fine woman. n. A cucumber; coition; dalliance.

[Sanskrit to German] (Deutsch Wörterbuch)

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Böhtlingk and Roth Grosses Petersburger Wörterbuch

Ramaṇa (रमण):—(von ram)

1) adj. (f. ī) ergötzend, erfreuend gaṇa nandyādi zu [Pāṇini’s acht Bücher.3,1,134.] [Bhāgavatapurāṇa.4,6,11.5,7,11.8,8,7. 10,21,5.] [Oxforder Handschriften 37,b, No. 92. 129,a,30.] [Bhaṭṭikavya.6,72.] —

2) m. a) Geliebter, Gatte [Hemacandra’s Abhidhānacintāmaṇi 517. 8.] [Anekārthasaṃgraha 3, 220.] [Medinīkoṣa ṇ. 73.] [Halāyudha 2, 342.] [Mahābhārata 12, 6516.] [Rāmāyaṇa Gorresio 2, 30, 15. 5, 13, 44.] [Meghadūta 38. 85.] [Vikramorvaśī 89.] [Raghuvaṃśa 14, 27.] [Kumārasaṃbhava 4, 21.] [Spr. 902. 1555. 1896. 2162. 2254. 2667. 3161. 4729.] [ŚṚṄGĀRARAS. 3] bei [HAEB. 513.] [Śiśupālavadha 9, 60.] [Gītagovinda 3, 10. 10, 9.] [BHĀG.] [Pāṇini’s acht Bücher 4, 6, 11.] [PAÑCAR. 4, 3, 129.] [Hemacandra’s Abhidhānacintāmaṇi 701.] kṣapā der Gatte der Nacht, der Mond [Rājataraṅgiṇī 3, 269.] — b) der Liebesgott [Medinīkoṣa] — c) Esel [Hemacandra’s Anekārthasaṃgraha] — d) Testikel [Śabdacandrikā im Śabdakalpadruma] — e) ein best. Baum, = mahāriṣṭa [Rājanirghaṇṭa im Śabdakalpadruma] — f) Nomen proprium α) einer mythischen Person, eines Sohnes der Manoharā, [Mahābhārata 1, 2586.] [Harivaṃśa 155.] — β) Beiname Aruṇa’s, des Wagenlenkers der Sonne, [Trikāṇḍaśeṣa 1, 1, 102.] — γ) eines Mannes [Pravarādhyāya] in [Weber’s Verzeichniss 56, 12.] — δ) pl. eines Volkes (vgl. ramaṭha) [Mahābhārata 6, 374] [?(Viṣṇupurāṇa 194).] —

3) f. ā a) ein junges reizendes Weib [Scholiast] zu [Amarakoṣa 2, 6, 1, 4.] — b) ein best. Metrum, 4 Mal ˘ ˘ ¯ [Colebrooke II, 158 (III, 4).] — c) Name der Dākṣāyaṇī in Rāmatīrtha [Oxforder Handschriften 39,b,16.] —

4) f. ī a) ein junges reizendes Weib, Geliebte, Gattin [Amarakoṣa 2, 6, 1, 4.] [Hemacandra’s Abhidhānacintāmaṇi 505.] [Medinīkoṣa] [Halāyudha 2, 327.] [Rāmāyaṇa 3, 43, 35.] [Spr. 531.] [Kathāsaritsāgara 52, 214.] [Rājataraṅgiṇī 6, 301.] bhogaḥ ko ramaṇīṃ vinā [PRASAṄGĀBH.7,b,2.] [Bhāgavatapurāṇa 10,14,31.] [NALOD.2,14.] [KUVALAY. 167],a. — b) Aloe indica Royle, = bālā [Śabdacandrikā im Śabdakalpadruma] — c) ein best. Metrum, 4 Mal ˘ ˘ ¯ ˘ ˘ ¯ [Weber’s Indische Studien 8, 366.] 4 Mal ˘ ˘ ¯ [Colebrooke II, 158 (III, 4).] — d) Nomen proprium eines weiblichen Schlangendämons [Rājataraṅgiṇī 1, 263.] ramaṇyaṭavī [265.] —

5) n. a) sinnliches Vergnügen, Beischlaf, Begattung [Śabdaratnāvalī im Śabdakalpadruma] [Yāska’s Nirukta 6, 17.] ramaṇāyopeyate na dharmāya [12,13.] [Oxforder Handschriften 24,b,47.] mṛga [Pāṇini’s acht Bücher 6, 4, 24, Vārttika von Kātyāyana. 3. 3, 1, 26, Vārttika von Kātyāyana. 4,] [Scholiast] [Vopadeva’s Grammatik 8, 133.] — b) das Ergötzen, Erfreuen: loka [Bhāgavatapurāṇa 10, 2, 13.] das Ergötzen durch Befriedigung der Sinneslust; mit acc. des Mannes [ŚUK.] in [Lassen’s Anthologie (III) 36, 4.] — c) Hinterbacke, Schamgegend (jaghana) [Hemacandra’s Anekārthasaṃgraha] — d) die Wurzel von Trichosanthes dioeca Roxb. [Hemacandra’s Anekārthasaṃgraha] [Medinīkoṣa] — e) Nomen proprium eines Waldes [Harivaṃśa 8955.] — Vgl. uṣā, para, rajanī, rati, rasika, rākā.

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Rāmaṇa (रामण):—(vom caus. von ram)

1) m. Name zweier Pflanzen: Diospyros embryopteris Pers. und = girinimba [Rājanirghaṇṭa im Śabdakalpadruma] —

2) f. ā Nomen proprium einer Apsaras [Rāmāyaṇa 2, 91, 45.] vāmanā ed. Bomb.

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Ramaṇa (रमण):—n. Vergnügen überh.: bālaḥ prāyo ramaṇāsaktaḥ [Spr. (II) 4432.]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Sanskrit-Wörterbuch in kürzerer Fassung

Ramaṇa (रमण):——

1) Adj. (f. ī) ergötzend , erfreuend.

2) m. — a) Geliebter , Gatte. — b) *der Liebesgott. — c) *Esel. — d) *Testikel. — e) *ein der Melia Bukayun verwandter Baum [Rājan 9,13.] = tinduka [11,78.] — f) *Beiname Aruṇa's. Wagenlenkers der Sonne. — g) Nomen proprium — α) einer mythischen Person , eines Sohnes der Manoharā. — β) Pl. eines Volkes. — γ) eines Mannes. —

3) f. ā — a) *ein junges reizendes Weib. — b) ein best. Metrum. — c) Name der Dākṣāyaṇī in Rāmatīrtha. —

4) f. ī — a) ein junges reizendes Weib , Geliebte , Gattin. — b) *Aloe indica. — c) ein best. Metrum. — d) Nomen proprium eines weiblichen Schlangendämons. —

5) n. — a) Vergnügen. — b) sinnliches Vergnügen , Beischlaf , Begattung. — c) das Ergötzen , Erfreuen. — d) das Ergötzen durch Befriedigung der Sinneslust , mit Acc. des Mannes. — e) *Hinterbacke ; Schamgegend. — f) *die Wurzel von Trichosanthes dioeca. — g) Nomen proprium eines Waldes.

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Rāmaṇa (रामण):——

1) *m. — a) Diospyros embryopteris. ramaṇa [Rājan 11,78.] — b) ein der Melia Bukayun verwandter Baum [Rājan 8,13.] —

2) f. ā Nomen proprium einer Apsaras. v.l. vāmanā.

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Hindi dictionary

Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

1) Ramaṇa (रमण) [Also spelled raman]:—(nm) sporting, amorous dalliance, erotic playfulness, merriment; (a) sportive, playful; as an adjectival suffix it means dear (to), as '[umāramaṇa]'.

2) Ramanā (रमना) [Also spelled ramna]:—(v) to enjoy, to make merry; to roam/rove, to wander about.

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