Ramaka, Rāmaka: 13 definitions

Introduction:

Ramaka means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India, Hindi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

Alternative spellings of this word include Ramak.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopedia

Rāmaka (रामक).—A mountain. Sahadeva, during his triumphal tour of the south, conquered this mountain. (Sabhā Parva, Chapter 31, Verse 68).

Source: JatLand: List of Mahabharata people and places

Rāmaka (रामक) is a name mentioned in the Mahābhārata (cf. II.28.46) and represents one of the many proper names used for people and places. Note: The Mahābhārata (mentioning Rāmaka) is a Sanskrit epic poem consisting of 100,000 ślokas (metrical verses) and is over 2000 years old.

Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

Discover the meaning of ramaka in the context of Purana from relevant books on Exotic India

In Buddhism

Theravada (major branch of Buddhism)

Source: Pali Kanon: Pali Proper Names

, or Ramuka. A vihara in Ceylon, built by Gajabahukagamani in the last year of his reign (Mhv.xxxv.122). v.l. Bhamuka.

context information

Theravāda is a major branch of Buddhism having the the Pali canon (tipitaka) as their canonical literature, which includes the vinaya-pitaka (monastic rules), the sutta-pitaka (Buddhist sermons) and the abhidhamma-pitaka (philosophy and psychology).

Discover the meaning of ramaka in the context of Theravada from relevant books on Exotic India

Tibetan Buddhism (Vajrayana or tantric Buddhism)

Source: BDK Tripiṭaka: The Susiddhikara-sūtra

Ramakā (रमका) refers to one of the various types of cakes mentioned in Chapter 12 (“offering food”) of the Susiddhikara-sūtra. Accordingly, “Offer [viz., ramakā cakes], [...]. Cakes such as the above are either made with granular sugar or made by mixing in ghee or sesamum oil. As before, take them in accordance with the family in question and use them as offerings; if you offer them up as prescribed, you will quickly gain success. [...]”.

When you wish to offer food [viz., ramakā cakes], first cleanse the ground, sprinkle scented water all around, spread out on the ground leaves that have been washed clean, such as lotus leaves, palāśa (dhak) leaves, and leaves from lactescent trees, or new cotton cloth, and then set down the oblatory dishes. [...] First smear and sprinkle the ground and then spread the leaves; wash your hands clean, rinse out your mouth several times, swallow some water, and then you should set down the food [viz., ramakā]. [...]

Tibetan Buddhism book cover
context information

Tibetan Buddhism includes schools such as Nyingma, Kadampa, Kagyu and Gelug. Their primary canon of literature is divided in two broad categories: The Kangyur, which consists of Buddha’s words, and the Tengyur, which includes commentaries from various sources. Esotericism and tantra techniques (vajrayāna) are collected indepently.

Discover the meaning of ramaka in the context of Tibetan Buddhism from relevant books on Exotic India

India history and geography

Source: archive.org: Personal and geographical names in the Gupta inscriptions

Rāmaka (रामक) is an example of a name based on Rāma mentioned in the Gupta inscriptions. Lord Rāma is believed to be the seventh incarnation of Viṣṇu. Rāma occurring in our inscriptions seems to have been Rāma Rāghava. The Gupta empire (r. 3rd-century CE), founded by Śrī Gupta, covered much of ancient India and embraced the Dharmic religions such as Hinduism, Buddhism and Jainism. Derivation of personal names (e.g., Rāmaka) during the rule of the Guptas followed patterns such as tribes, places, rivers and mountains.

India history book cover
context information

The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

Discover the meaning of ramaka in the context of India history from relevant books on Exotic India

Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Ramaka (रमक).—a. Sporting.

-kaḥ A lover.

--- OR ---

Rāmaka (रामक).—a. Delighting, gratifying, pleasing.

-kaḥ a particular form of a temple.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Ramaka (रमक).—m.

(-kaḥ) A lover, a gallant. E. ram to sport, kvun aff.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Ramaka (रमक).—[ram + aka], m. A lover, a gallant.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Ramaka (रमक):—[from ram] mfn. sporting, dallying, toying amorously

2) [v.s. ...] m. a lover, suitor, [Monier-Williams’ Sanskrit-English Dictionary]

3) Rāmaka (रामक):—[from rāma] mfn. ([from] [Causal] of √ram) delighting, gratifying, [Pāṇini 7-3, 34]

4) [v.s. ...] = ramaka, enjoying one’s self, playing, sporting, [Vopadeva]

5) [v.s. ...] m. a [particular] form of a temple, [Hemādri’s Caturvarga-cintāmaṇi]

6) [v.s. ...] a [particular] mixed caste, [Vasiṣṭha] (either ‘a Vaidehaka who sews and dyes clothes’, or ‘a Māgadha who lives as a messenger’ [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.])

7) [v.s. ...] Name of Rāma Rāghava, [Agni-purāṇa]

8) [v.s. ...] of a mountain, [Mahābhārata]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Ramaka (रमक):—(kaḥ) 1. m. A lover.

[Sanskrit to German]

Ramaka in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

Discover the meaning of ramaka in the context of Sanskrit from relevant books on Exotic India

Hindi dictionary

Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

Ramaka (रमक) [Also spelled ramak]:—(nf) whim, caprice; swing; ~[] whimsical, capricious.

context information

...

Discover the meaning of ramaka in the context of Hindi from relevant books on Exotic India

See also (Relevant definitions)

Relevant text

Like what you read? Consider supporting this website: