Raktanga, aka: Raktāṅga, Rakta-anga; 5 Definition(s)

Introduction

Raktanga means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Ayurveda (science of life)

Raktanga in Ayurveda glossary... « previous · [R] · next »

1) Raktāṅga (रक्ताङ्ग) is another name for Kampillaka (Mallotus philippensis) according to the Bhāvaprakāśa, which is a 16th century medicinal thesaurus authored by Bhāvamiśra. The term is used throughout Āyurvedic literature. It can also be spelled as Kampilla (कम्पिल्ल).

2) Raktāṅga (रक्ताङ्ग) is another name (synonym) for Kampillaka, which is the Sanskrit word for Mallotus philippensis (kamala tree), a plant from the Cleomaceae family. This synonym was identified by Narahari in his 13th-century Rājanighaṇṭu (verse 13.99), which is an Āyurvedic medicinal thesaurus.

Source: Wisdom Library: Āyurveda and botany
Ayurveda book cover
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Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Raktanga in Purana glossary... « previous · [R] · next »

Raktāṅga (रक्ताङ्ग).—A nāga born in Dhṛtarāṣṭra’s dynasty. It was burnt to death at the yajña of Janamejaya. (Ādi Parva, Chapter 57, Verse 18).

Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopaedia

Raktāṅga (रक्ताङ्ग) is a name mentioned in the Mahābhārata (cf. I.52.16, I.57) and represents one of the many proper names used for people and places. Note: The Mahābhārata (mentioning Raktāṅga) is a Sanskrit epic poem consisting of 100,000 ślokas (metrical verses) and is over 2000 years old.

Source: JatLand: List of Mahabharata people and places
Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit-English dictionary

Raktanga in Sanskrit glossary... « previous · [R] · next »

Raktāṅga (रक्ताङ्ग).—

1) a bug.

2) the planet Mars.

3) the disc of the sun or moon. (-ṅgam) 1 a coral (also m. and f.)

2) saffron.

Derivable forms: raktāṅgaḥ (रक्ताङ्गः).

Raktāṅga is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms rakta and aṅga (अङ्ग).

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Raktāṅga (रक्ताङ्ग).—m.

(-ṅgaḥ) 1. The planet Mars. 2. A plant, (a species of Crinum.) 3. A bug. n.

(-ṅgaṃ) 1. Coral. 2. Saffron. f. (-ṅgī) A plant, (Celtis orientalis.) E. rakta red and aṅga body.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary
context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Relevant definitions

Search found 1150 related definition(s) that might help you understand this better. Below you will find the 15 most relevant articles:

Anga
Aṅga (अङ्ग) is the name of a country classified as both Hādi and Kādi (two types of Tantrik div...
Rakta
Rakta (रक्त).—mfn. (-ktaḥ-ktā-ktaṃ) 1. Dyed, tinged, coloured, stained. 2. Red, of a red colour...
Khatvanga
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Pancanga
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Vedanga
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Caturanga
Caturaṅga (consisting of) four limbs or divisions, fourfold M. I, 77; J. I, 390; II, 190, 192; ...
Upanga
Upāṅga (उपाङ्ग).—m. (-ṅgaḥ) 1. The sectarial mark made with Sandal, &c. on the forehead. 2....
Shadanga
Ṣaḍaṅga (षडङ्ग) or Ṣaḍaṅgamantra is the name of a mantra that is chanted during Dhārāpūjā, acco...
Ashtanga
Aṣṭāṅga (अष्टाङ्ग) refers to “eight limbs”, used in the worship of Śiva, according to the Śivap...
Raktapitta
Raktapitta (रक्तपित्त).—m. (-ttaḥ) Plethora, spontaneous hæmorrhages from the mouth, nose, rect...
Varanga
Varāṅga (वराङ्ग).—n. (-ṅgaṃ) 1. The head. 2. The privity, a private part, male or female. 3. Ca...
Vatarakta
Vātarakta (वातरक्त).—n. (-ktaṃ) Acute gout or rheumatism. E. vāta wind, and rakta blood; ascrib...
Yajnanga
Yajñāṅga (यज्ञाङ्ग).—m. (-ṅgaḥ) 1. The glomerous fig, (Ficus glomerata, Rox.) 2. A plant, (Siph...
Raktaksha
Raktākṣa (रक्ताक्ष).—mfn. (-kṣaḥ-kṣī-kṣa) Red-eyed. m. (-kṣaḥ) 1. A buffalo. 2. A pigeon. 3. Th...
Lohitanga
Lohitāṅga (लोहिताङ्ग).—m. (-ṅgaḥ) The planet Mars. E. lohita, aṅga body.

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