Rajavarta, Rajan-avarta, Rajan-varta, Rājāvarta, Rājavarta: 9 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Rajavarta means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Rasashastra (chemistry and alchemy)

Source: Wisdom Library: Rasa-śāstra

1) Rājāvarta (राजावर्त, “lapis lazuli”):—One of the eight mahārasa (‘superior minerals’), according to the Rasaprakāśasudhākara: a 13th century Sanskrit book on Indian alchemy, or, Rasaśāstra.

2) Rājāvarta (राजावर्त, “lapis lazuli”) or Rājāvartarasa is the name of a Ayurvedic recipe defined in the fifth volume of the Rasajalanidhi (chapter 20, Madyapana: evil effects of wine ). These remedies are classified as Iatrochemistry and form part of the ancient Indian science known as Rasaśāstra (medical alchemy). However, since it is an ayurveda treatment it should be taken with caution and in accordance with rules laid down in the texts.

Accordingly, when using such recipes (e.g., rājāvarta-rasa): “the minerals (uparasa), poisons (viṣa), and other drugs (except herbs), referred to as ingredients of medicines, are to be duly purified and incinerated, as the case may be, in accordance with the processes laid out in the texts.” (see introduction to Iatro chemical medicines)

Source: Indian Journal of History of Science: Rasaprakāśa-sudhākara, chapter 4-5

The best Rājāvarta (‘Lapis lazuli’) is that which is slightly reddish, bluish or mixed colours, heavy in weight and masṛṇa (smooth) on surface. It is dīpana (stimulates digestive fire), pācana (digestive) vṛṣya (aphrodisiac), pacifies vāta-doṣa and viṣa-doṣa, destroys kaphaja-rogas, pramehas, arśas, pāṇḍu and kṣaya-rogas.

Rasashastra book cover
context information

Rasashastra (रसशास्त्र, rasaśāstra) is an important branch of Ayurveda, specialising in chemical interactions with herbs, metals and minerals. Some texts combine yogic and tantric practices with various alchemical operations. The ultimate goal of Rasashastra is not only to preserve and prolong life, but also to bestow wealth upon humankind.

Discover the meaning of rajavarta in the context of Rasashastra from relevant books on Exotic India

India history and geography

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary

Rājāvarta.—(SII 2; SITI), a kind of gem; lapis lazuli; same as vaiḍūrya. Note: rājāvarta is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

India history book cover
context information

The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

Discover the meaning of rajavarta in the context of India history from relevant books on Exotic India

Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

[«previous next»] — Rajavarta in Marathi glossary
Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

rājāvarta (राजावर्त).—m An inferior sort of diamond.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

Discover the meaning of rajavarta in the context of Marathi from relevant books on Exotic India

Sanskrit dictionary

[«previous next»] — Rajavarta in Sanskrit glossary
Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Rājāvarta (राजावर्त).—a diamond of an inferior quality.

2) a diamond from Virāṭa country.

Derivable forms: rājāvartaḥ (राजावर्तः).

Rājāvarta is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms rājan and āvarta (आवर्त).

--- OR ---

Rājavarta (राजवर्त).—cloth of various colours.

Derivable forms: rājavartaḥ (राजवर्तः).

Rājavarta is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms rājan and varta (वर्त).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Rājāvarta (राजावर्त).—m. an inferior kind of diamond. Ṣoḍaśāvarta, i. e.

Rājāvarta is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms rājan and āvarta (आवर्त).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Rājavarta (राजवर्त):—[=rāja-varta] [from rāja > rāj] m. cloth of various colours, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

2) Rājāvarta (राजावर्त):—[from rāja > rāj] m. (once n.) Lapis Lazuli, [Bālarāmāyaṇa]

3) [v.s. ...] a kind of diamond or other gem (of an inferior quality, said to come from the country Virāṭa, and regarded as a lucky possession though not esteemed as an ornament; = rāja-maṇi, [Varāha-mihira’s Bṛhat-saṃhitā [Scholiast or Commentator]]; also topala m., [Kathāsaritsāgara])

4) [v.s. ...] n. cloth of various colours, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.] (cf. rāja-v).

[Sanskrit to German] (Deutsch Wörterbuch)

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Böhtlingk and Roth Grosses Petersburger Wörterbuch

Rājāvarta (राजावर्त):—m. eine Art Diamant [Hemacandra’s Abhidhānacintāmaṇi 1066.] rājāvartopalaśyāma [Kathāsaritsāgara 73, 339.] unter den rasa aufgeführt [Oxforder Handschriften 321,a, No. 761.]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Sanskrit-Wörterbuch in kürzerer Fassung

Rājāvarta (राजावर्त):—m. ([Rājan 13,7.214]) n. ([Hemādri’s Caturvargacintāmaṇi 2,] [47,5]) Lapis lazuli [Bālarāmāyaṇa 241,2.] = rājamaṇi [UTPALA] zu [Varāhamihira’s Bṛhatsaṃhitā 80,4.] Auch rājāvartopala m.

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

Discover the meaning of rajavarta in the context of Sanskrit from relevant books on Exotic India

See also (Relevant definitions)

Relevant text

Like what you read? Consider supporting this website: