Puya, Pūya: 18 definitions

Introduction:

Puya means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi, Hindi, biology. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Pūya (पूय) refers to “putrid matter”, according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.3.15 (“The penance and reign of Tārakāsura”).—Accordingly, as Brahmā narrated: “[...] At the same time, several phenomena of evil portent forboding misery and distress happened, when the son of Varāṅgī was born making the gods miserable. [...] Beasts in sheds and forests roamed here and there in great fright as though beaten and driven about, passing urine and shitting dungs as they pleased. Frightened cows sprayed blood through their udders; their eyes brimmed with tears, clouds showering putrid matter [i.e., pūya-varṣin] became terrifying. [...]”.

Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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In Buddhism

Mahayana (major branch of Buddhism)

Source: Wisdom Library: Maha Prajnaparamita Sastra

1) Pūya (पूय, “pus”) (Pali, Pubba) refers to one of the thirty-substances of the human body according to the Visuddhimagga, as mentioned in an appendix of the 2nd century Mahāprajñāpāramitāśāstra chapter 32-34. The Mahāprajñāpāramitāśāstra mentions thirty-six substances [viz., pūya]; the Sanskrit sources of both the Lesser and the Greater Vehicles, physical substances are 26 in number while the Pāli suttas list thirty-once substances.

2) Pūya (पूय) refers to “pus”, according Mahāprajñāpāramitāśāstra (chapter XLVI).—There are also Pretas who emit fire from their mouth (ulkāmukha): flying butterflies throw themselves into this fire, and the Pretas eat them. There are also Pretas who eat excrement (gūtha), spit (śleṣman), pus and blood (pūya-śoṇita), the water from laundry, who feed on oblations (śraddhabhoktṛ) or who devour the afterbirth (garbhamalāhāra). There are all kinds of starving Pretas of this kind.

Source: academia.edu: A Study and Translation of the Gaganagañjaparipṛcchā

Pūya (पूय) refers to “pus”, according to the Gaganagañjaparipṛcchā: the eighth chapter of the Mahāsaṃnipāta (a collection of Mahāyāna Buddhist Sūtras).—Accordingly: “Then the Bodhisattva named Kālarāja addressed himself to the Bodhisattva Gaganagañja: ‘In this Saha universe, son of good family, there are living beings suffering from poverty, lacking food or drink, and wearing ragged clothes; there are hungry ghosts tormented by hunger and thirst, covering themselves with their hairs, and subsisting on such as spittle, mucus, blood, and pus (pūya). In order to protect these living beings, please pour down the rain of food, drink, and clothing!’ [...]”.

Mahayana book cover
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Mahayana (महायान, mahāyāna) is a major branch of Buddhism focusing on the path of a Bodhisattva (spiritual aspirants/ enlightened beings). Extant literature is vast and primarely composed in the Sanskrit language. There are many sūtras of which some of the earliest are the various Prajñāpāramitā sūtras.

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Tibetan Buddhism (Vajrayana or tantric Buddhism)

Source: OSU Press: Cakrasamvara Samadhi

Pūya (पूय) or “pus” is associated with Khaṇḍorohā and Ratnavajra, according to the Cakrasaṃvara-maṇḍala or Saṃvaramaṇḍala of Abhayākaragupta’s Niṣpannayogāvalī, p. 45 and n. 145; (Cf. Cakrasaṃvaratantra, Gray, David B., 2007).—The Cakrasaṃvara mandala has a total of sixty-two deities. [...] Three concentric circles going outward, the body, speech and mind wheels (kāya-vāka-citta), in the order: mind (blue), speech (red), and body (white), with eight Ḍākinīs each in non-dual union with their Ḍākas, "male consorts".

Associated elements of Khaṇḍorohā and Ratnavajra:

Circle: kāyacakra (body-wheel) (white);
Ḍākinī (female consort): Khaṇḍorohā;
Ḍāka (male consort): Ratnavajra;
Bīja: gṛṃ;
Body-part: anus;
Pīṭha: Gṛhadevatā;
Bodily constituent: pūya (pus);
Bodhipakṣha (wings of enlightenment): praśrabdhibodhyaṅga (awakening of confidence).

Tibetan Buddhism book cover
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Tibetan Buddhism includes schools such as Nyingma, Kadampa, Kagyu and Gelug. Their primary canon of literature is divided in two broad categories: The Kangyur, which consists of Buddha’s words, and the Tengyur, which includes commentaries from various sources. Esotericism and tantra techniques (vajrayāna) are collected indepently.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

pūya : (m.) pus.

Pali book cover
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Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

pūya (पूय).—n S Pus, sanies, ichor.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Pūya (पूय).—Pus, discharge from an ulcer or wound, suppuration, matter; भिषजे पूयशोणितम् (bhiṣaje pūyaśoṇitam) Manusmṛti 3.18; पूयं चिकित्सकस्यान्नम् (pūyaṃ cikitsakasyānnam) 4.22;12.72.

Derivable forms: pūyaḥ (पूयः), pūyam (पूयम्).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Pūya (पूय).—n.

(-yaṃ) Pus, matter, discharge from an ulcer, sore or wound, E. pūy to stink, aff. ac.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Pūya (पूय).—[pūy + a], m. and n. Pus, matter, [Mānavadharmaśāstra] 3, 180.

— Cf. [Latin] pus.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Pūya (पूय).—[masculine] [neuter] pus.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Pūya (पूय):—[from pūy] m. n. purulent matter, pus, suppuration, discharge from an ulcer or wound, [Śatapatha-brāhmaṇa]; etc.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Pūya (पूय):—(yaṃ) 1. n. Pus, matter.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Pūya (पूय) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit word: Pūa.

[Sanskrit to German]

Puya in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Hindi dictionary

Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

Pūya (पूय) [Also spelled puy]:—(nm) pus, purulent matter.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Pūya (ಪೂಯ):—

1) [noun] the thick opaque usu. yellowish white fluid matter produced in certain infections and composed of containing white blood corpuscles, tissue debris, and microorganisms; the pus.

2) [noun] an abnormal bodily protuberance or localised enlargement; the swollen part of the body.

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Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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