Putraka, Putrakā: 14 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Putraka means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopedia

Putraka (पुत्रक).—A King. (See under Pāṭalīputra).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

Putraka (पुत्रक).—A son of Kuru.*

  • * Vāyu-purāṇa 99. 218.
Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Kavya (poetry)

[«previous next»] — Putraka in Kavya glossary
Source: Wisdom Library: Kathāsaritsāgara

Putraka (पुत्रक) is the grandson of Bhojika, a Brāhman, whose story is told in the tale called ‘the founding of the city of Pāṭaliputra’, according to the Kathāsaritsāgara, chapter 3. Accordingly, Śiva told the three daughters of Bhojika in a dream: “This young son of yours shall be called Putraka; and every day when he awakes from sleep a hundred thousand gold pieces shall be found under his pillow, and at last he shall become a king.”

The Kathāsaritsāgara (‘ocean of streams of story’), mentioning Putraka, is a famous Sanskrit epic story revolving around prince Naravāhanadatta and his quest to become the emperor of the vidyādharas (celestial beings). The work is said to have been an adaptation of Guṇāḍhya’s Bṛhatkathā consisting of 100,000 verses, which in turn is part of a larger work containing 700,000 verses.

context information

Kavya (काव्य, kavya) refers to Sanskrit poetry, a popular ancient Indian tradition of literature. There have been many Sanskrit poets over the ages, hailing from ancient India and beyond. This topic includes mahakavya, or ‘epic poetry’ and natya, or ‘dramatic poetry’.

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Natyashastra (theatrics and dramaturgy)

Source: Wisdom Library: Nāṭya-śāstra

Putraka (पुत्रक, “son”) refers to a specific “mode of address” (nāman) used in drama (nāṭya), according to Nāṭyaśāstra chapter 19. Putraka is used by the guru or the father to address a disciple or a son. A similair term that can be used in the same situation would be Vatsa.

Natyashastra book cover
context information

Natyashastra (नाट्यशास्त्र, nāṭyaśāstra) refers to both the ancient Indian tradition (śāstra) of performing arts, (nāṭya, e.g., theatrics, drama, dance, music), as well as the name of a Sanskrit work dealing with these subjects. It also teaches the rules for composing dramatic plays (nataka) and poetic works (kavya).

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Source: Shodhganga: Temple management in the Āgamas

Putraka (पुत्रक) refers to a Śaiva initiate who underwent the Viśeṣadīkṣā, as defined in Dīkṣā (initiation) hierarchy.—Dīkṣā also gives rise to four broad hierarchies, depending on the ritual performed and the resulting spiritual progress. Samaya and Viśeṣa dīkṣā lead an initiate up to the rudra-tattva and īśvara-tattva. These initiates are called Samayī. In Nirvāṇa-dīkṣā, special processes cut the kārmic bonds and other bondages, making him a Putraka. Abhiṣeka with the sādhyamantra, along with other rituals, makes him a Sādhaka. Abhiṣeka with all mantras, along with other rituals, makes the Sādhaka an Ācārya. Each level of dīkṣā bestows certain rights and responsibilities on the initiate.

The Samayī and Putraka can only perform nityapūjā, if they have niradhikāra-dīkṣā. The Samayī, Putraka and Sādhaka all work under the Ācārya and assist him in different ways during the pūjā. They are all under a sort of apprenticeship, getting trained formally as well as by observation.

Shaivism book cover
context information

Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

Putraka (पुत्रक) refers to a “spiritual son”, according to the Manthānabhairavatantra, a vast sprawling work that belongs to a corpus of Tantric texts concerned with the worship of the goddess Kubjikā.—Accordingly, “How is (the conduct of) the follower of the Rule (samayin), the spiritual son (putraka) and the adept (sādhaka)? (What is) the state of the teacher (ācārya)? In brief, (what is) the teaching concerning the four stages of life (āśrama)”.

Shaktism book cover
context information

Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Putraka (पुत्रक).—[putra anukampāyāṃ saṃjñāyāṃ vā kan svārthe ka vā]

1) A little son or boy, boy, chap, lad (often used as a term of endearment); हा हा पुत्रक नाधीतं सुगतैतासु रात्रिषु (hā hā putraka nādhītaṃ sugataitāsu rātriṣu).

2) A doll, puppet; सा कन्दुकैः कृत्रिमपुत्रकैश्च रेमे (sā kandukaiḥ kṛtrimaputrakaiśca reme) Ku.1.29.

3) A rogue, cheat.

4) A locust, grass-hopper.

5) A fabulous animal with eight feet (śarabha).

6) Hair.

7) A pitiable person.

Derivable forms: putrakaḥ (पुत्रकः).

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Putrakā (पुत्रका).—

1) A daughter.

2) A doll, puppet.

3) A daughter appointed to raise male issue for a father who has no sons; अपुत्राऽ नेन विधिना सुतां कुर्वीत पुत्रिकाम् । यदपत्यं भवेदस्यां तन्मम स्यात् स्वधाकरम् (aputrā' nena vidhinā sutāṃ kurvīta putrikām | yadapatyaṃ bhavedasyāṃ tanmama syāt svadhākaram) || Ms.9.127.

4) The cotton or down of the tamarisk.

6) A small statue; तद्धाम्नाऽभूदजस्तूष्णीं पूर्देव्यन्तीव पुत्रिका (taddhāmnā'bhūdajastūṣṇīṃ pūrdevyantīva putrikā) Bhāg.1.13.56.

6) (At the end of comp.) Anything little or small of its kind; as in असिपुत्रिका, खड्गपुत्रिका (asiputrikā, khaḍgaputrikā) &c.

See also (synonyms): putrikā.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Putraka (पुत्रक).—[putra + ka], I. m. A son, [Mānavadharmaśāstra] 2, 151. Ii. f. trikā and trakā. 1. A daughter, [Pañcatantra] 190, 2. 2. A daughter appointed to raise issue for her father, [Mānavadharmaśāstra] 9, 127. 3. A doll, Böhtl. Ind. Spr. 635.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Putraka (पुत्रक).—[masculine] little son, boy, [Name] of a man; [feminine] putrikā daughter, [especially] adopted daughter ([jurisprudence]), puppet, dole.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Putraka (पुत्रक):—[from putra] m. a little son, boy, child (often used as a term of endearment; ifc. f(ikā). ), [Ṛg-veda] etc. etc.

2) [v.s. ...] a puppet, doll, figure of stone or wood or lac etc. (cf. kṛtrima-, jatu-, śilā-; [gana] yāvādi)

3) [v.s. ...] a rogue, cheat, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

4) [v.s. ...] a species of small venomous animal (enumerated among the Mūṣikas), [Suśruta]

5) [v.s. ...] a grasshopper, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

6) [v.s. ...] a fabulous animal with 8 legs (= śarabha), [Horace H. Wilson]

7) [v.s. ...] hair, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

8) [v.s. ...] a species of tree, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

9) [v.s. ...] a grinding-stone, [Gobhila-śrāddha-kalpa [Scholiast or Commentator]]

10) [v.s. ...] Name of the supposed founder of Pāṭaliputra, [Kathāsaritsāgara]

11) [v.s. ...] of a mountain, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

12) Putrakā (पुत्रका):—[from putraka > putra] f. = next, [Pāṇini 7-3, 45], [vArttika] 10, [Patañjali]

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Putraka (पुत्रक) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit words: Puttaya, Puttalaya.

[Sanskrit to German]

Putraka in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Putraka (ಪುತ್ರಕ):—[noun] = ಪುತ್ರ - [putra -] 1.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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