Pururavas, Purūravas: 7 definitions

Introduction

Pururavas means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Natyashastra (theatrics and dramaturgy)

Source: archive.org: The mirror of gesture (abhinaya-darpana)

One of the Hands of Famous Emperors.—Purūravas: the Muṣṭi hand.

Natyashastra book cover
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Natyashastra (नाट्यशास्त्र, nāṭyaśāstra) refers to both the ancient Indian tradition (śāstra) of performing arts, (nāṭya, e.g., theatrics, drama, dance, music), as well as the name of a Sanskrit work dealing with these subjects. It also teaches the rules for composing dramatic plays (nataka) and poetic works (kavya).

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Kavya (poetry)

[«previous (P) next»] — Pururavas in Kavya glossary
Source: Wisdom Library: Kathāsaritsāgara

Purūravas (पुरूरवस्) is the name of a king whose story is told in the “story of Urvaśī”, according to the Kathāsaritsāgara, chapter 17. Accordingly, when king Purūravas (a devoted worshipper of Viṣṇu) was sauntering in the Nandana garden he crossed paths with the apsaras (heavenly nymp) named Urvaśī and they instantly fell in love.

The Kathāsaritsāgara (‘ocean of streams of story’), mentioning Purūravas, is a famous Sanskrit epic story revolving around prince Naravāhanadatta and his quest to become the emperor of the vidyādharas (celestial beings). The work is said to have been an adaptation of Guṇāḍhya’s Bṛhatkathā consisting of 100,000 verses, which in turn is part of a larger work containing 700,000 verses.

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Kavya (काव्य, kavya) refers to Sanskrit poetry, a popular ancient Indian tradition of literature. There have been many Sanskrit poets over the ages, hailing from ancient India and beyond. This topic includes mahakavya, or ‘epic poetry’ and natya, or ‘dramatic poetry’.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous (P) next»] — Pururavas in Purana glossary
Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopedia

1) Purūravas (पुरूरवस्).—A prominent king of Candravaṃśa (lunar race). Origin of Candravaṃśa and birth of Purūravas. Descending in order from Brahmā came Atri—Candra—Budha Purūravas. The dynasty which came from Candra was called the Candravaṃśa. Though Budha was the first king of Candravaṃśa it was Purūravas who became celebrated. The story of the birth of Purūravas is given below: (See full article at Story of Purūravas from the Puranic encyclopaedia by Vettam Mani)

2) Purūravas (पुरूरवस्).—A king of the race of Dīptākṣa. (Śloka 15, Chapter 74, Udyoga Parva).

Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit-English dictionary

[«previous (P) next»] — Pururavas in Sanskrit glossary
Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Purūravas (पुरूरवस्).—m. [cf. Uṇ.4.231] The son of Budha and Ilā and founder of the lunar race of kings. [He saw the nymph Urvaśī, while descending upon earth owing to the curse of Mitra and Varuṇa, and fell in love with her. Urvaśī, too, was enamoured of the king who was as renowned for personal beauty as for truthfulness, devotion, and generosity, and became his wife. They lived happily together for many days, and after she had borne him a son, she returned to the heaven. The king heavily mourned her loss, and she was pleased to repeat her visits five successive times and bore him five sons. But the king, who wanted her life-long company, was not evidently satisfied with this; and he obtained his desired object after he had offered oblations as directed by the Gandharvas. The story told in Vikramorvaśīya differs in many respects; so does the account given in the Śatapatha Brāhmaṇa, based on a passage in the Ṛigveda, where it is said that Urvaśī agreed to live with Purūravas on two conditions:-namely that her two rams which she loved as children must be kept near her bed-side and never suffered to be carried away, and that he must take care never to be seen by her undressed. The Gandharvas, however, carried away the rams, and so Urvaśī disappeared.]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Pururavas (पुरुरवस्).—m.

(-vāḥ) Kuvera: see purūravas.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Purūravas (पुरूरवस्).—m. The name of a king.

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Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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