Pum, Puṃ: 6 definitions

Introduction:

Pum means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

Images (photo gallery)

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopedia

Pum (पुम्).—(Put, Putra) Pum alias Put is a hell. Those who die without children go to this hell and he who saves one from this hell is called Putra. (Śloka 38, Chapter 74, Ādi Parva).

"puṃnāmno narakādyastu trāyate pitaraṃ sutaḥ / tasmāt putra iti proktaḥ svayameva svayambhuvā //" (Śloka 138, Chapter 9, Manusmṛti). (See full article at Story of Pum from the Puranic encyclopaedia by Vettam Mani)

Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

Discover the meaning of pum in the context of Purana from relevant books on Exotic India

Vyakarana (Sanskrit grammar)

Source: Wikisource: A dictionary of Sanskrit grammar

Pum (पुम्).—Or पुंस् (puṃs) masculine. It appears that both पुभ् (pubh), and पुंस् (puṃs) were current terms meaning 'masculine ' in ancient days. cf. पुमः खय्यम्परे (pumaḥ khayyampare) P.VIII. 3.12. and पुंसोसुङ् (puṃsosuṅ) P. VII. 1.89. Although पुभ् (pubh) is changed to पुंस् (puṃs) before a word beginning with a hard consonant, still पुंस् (puṃs) is given as an independent word derived from the root पा () cf. पातेर्डुम्सुन् (pāterḍumsun) Unādi S IV. 177; cf. also the expressions पुंवचन, पुंलिङ्ग (puṃvacana, puṃliṅga) and पुंयोग (puṃyoga).

context information

Vyakarana (व्याकरण, vyākaraṇa) refers to Sanskrit grammar and represents one of the six additional sciences (vedanga) to be studied along with the Vedas. Vyakarana concerns itself with the rules of Sanskrit grammar and linguistic analysis in order to establish the correct context of words and sentences.

Discover the meaning of pum in the context of Vyakarana from relevant books on Exotic India

General definition (in Hinduism)

Source: Hindu Dharma Forums: Mantra /Sanskrit Question

Puṃ (पुं) = Puṃs is a masculine word but also defined as a man , a male being , a human being ; it looses its 's' before a consonant in this case 'la' in liṅga.

Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Pum (पुम्).—and pumāṃs pumāṃs, see puṃs.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Puṃ (पुं):—[from puṃs] 1. puṃ in [compound] for 2. puṃs.

2) [from puṃs] 2. puṃ in comp. before k, j, etc.

3) Pum (पुम्):—[from puṃsāka] a in [compound] for 2. puṃs.

4) b pum-anujā etc. See p.631.

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

Discover the meaning of pum in the context of Sanskrit from relevant books on Exotic India

Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Puṃ (ಪುಂ):—

1) [noun] a male human being.

2) [noun] (myth.) a hell which a person not having a male issue was believed to get into after death.

3) [noun] (gram.) the gender of words denoting or referring to males; the masculine gender.

--- OR ---

Puṃ (ಪುಂ):—

1) [noun] a male human being.

2) [noun] (myth.) a hell which a person not having a male issue was believed to get into after death.

3) [noun] (gram.) the gender of words denoting or referring to males; the masculine gender.

--- OR ---

Puṇ (ಪುಣ್):—[noun] = ಪುಣ್ಣು [punnu].

--- OR ---

Pūṇ (ಪೂಣ್):—

1) [verb] to set an arrow on to a bow, to be shot.

2) [verb] to associate or blend different things harmoniously.

3) [verb] to be associated, blended harmoniously with.

4) [verb] to get; to have; to posess.

5) [verb] to cause to happen.

6) [verb] to cover from all sides.

7) [verb] to start, begin (something).

8) [verb] to agree; to consent; to accept.

9) [verb] to undertake (a job, religious vow, etc.).

10) [verb] to become firm, stable.

11) [verb] to make a solemn resolution.

12) [verb] to make a promise; to promise solemnly.

13) [verb] to make up one’s mind; to reach a decision; to decide.

14) [verb] to happen; to occur.

15) [verb] to face in opposition; to confront; to fight.

16) [verb] to put a burden on; to load; to burden.

--- OR ---

Pūṇ (ಪೂಣ್):—

1) [verb] to hide (something) in the ground.

2) [verb] to put (a dead body) into the earth; to bury.

3) [verb] to fill a pig, hollow in the ground with soil, stone, etc.

4) [verb] to cause to go under the surface of water.

5) [verb] to cover or veil with or as with a veil, lid, etc.

6) [verb] to under the surface of water.

7) [verb] to be filled with.

8) [verb] to be lost from the mind; to be forgotten.

9) [verb] to fill (something) into (a container, room, etc.) tightly.

10) [verb] to remove; to take off; to ward off.

11) [verb] to be concealed; to disappear from sight.

12) [verb] to close one’s mouth or eyes, etc.

13) [verb] to go or enter into.

--- OR ---

Pūṇ (ಪೂಣ್):—

1) [noun] a solemn promise or pledge, esp. one made to a god, dedicating oneself to an act, service or way of life; a vow.

2) [noun] an oral or written agreement to do or not to do something; a promise.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

Discover the meaning of pum in the context of Kannada from relevant books on Exotic India

See also (Relevant definitions)

Relevant text

Like what you read? Consider supporting this website: