Puṇyajana, Punyajana, Punya-jana: 10 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Puṇyajana means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous next»] — Puṇyajana in Purana glossary
Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopedia

Puṇyajana (पुण्यजन).—A rākṣasa. Raivata, king of Kuśasthalī, born of the race of Śaryāti, went to see Brahmā. Taking advantage of his absence from the place Puṇyajana took control over Kuśasthalī. Afraid of the demon all the hundred brothers of Raivata left the country. After some time the Śaryāti dynasty merged with that of Hehaya. (Chapter 2, Aṃśa 4, Viṣṇu Purāṇa).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

Puṇyajana (पुण्यजन).—(Yakṣas): sons and grandsons of Puṇyajaṇī who married Maṇibhadrā;1 worshipped for protection.2 Sacked Kuśaṣṭhalī during the absence of Kakudmi in Brahmaloka.3

  • 1) Vāyu-purāṇa 69. 157; 88. 1.
  • 2) Bhāgavata-purāṇa II. 3. 8; Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa III. 7. 162,
  • 3) Ib. III. 68. 1; Viṣṇu-purāṇa IV. 2. 1.
Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

Discover the meaning of puṇyajana or punyajana in the context of Purana from relevant books on Exotic India

Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

[«previous next»] — Puṇyajana in Sanskrit glossary
Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Puṇyajana (पुण्यजन).—

1) a virtuous man.

2) a demon, goblin; वियति प्रसमीक्ष्य कालमेघमप्रतिमं पुण्यजनौघमुन्नदन्तम् (viyati prasamīkṣya kālameghamapratimaṃ puṇyajanaughamunnadantam) Rām. Ch.2.56.

3) a Yakṣa; Bhāg.4.1.3; पयोधरैः पुण्यजनाङ्गनानाम् (payodharaiḥ puṇyajanāṅganānām) R.13.6. °ईश्वरः (īśvaraḥ) an epithet of Kubera; अनुययौ यमपुण्यजनेश्वरौ (anuyayau yamapuṇyajaneśvarau) R.9.6.

Derivable forms: puṇyajanaḥ (पुण्यजनः).

Puṇyajana is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms puṇya and jana (जन).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Puṇyajana (पुण्यजन).—m.

(-naḥ) 1. A fiend, a goblin, a Rakshasa. 2. A Yaksha, a divine being attendant on Kuvera, the god of wealth. 3. A pious or virtuous man. E. puṇya virtuous, and jana man, ṅīṣ added.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Puṇyajana (पुण्यजन).—m. pl. a kind of good demon. Pṛthagjana, i. e.

Puṇyajana is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms puṇya and jana (जन).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Puṇyajana (पुण्यजन).—[masculine] [plural] a kind of genii (lit. good people.)

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Puṇyajana (पुण्यजन):—[=puṇya-jana] [from puṇya] m. a good or honest man, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

2) [v.s. ...] ([plural]) good people (Name of a class of supernatural beings, [Atharva-veda] etc. etc.; in later times Name of the Yakṣas and of a [particular] class of Rākṣasas, [Kāvya literature; Purāṇa])

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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