Priyankara, Priyaṅkara, Priyaṅkarā: 9 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Priyankara means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit, the history of ancient India, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Shilpashastra (iconography)

Source: Wisdom Library: Śilpa-śāstra

Priyaṅkara (प्रियङ्कर) is a Sanskrit name referring to one of the eight manifestations of Saṃhāra, who is a form of Bhairava. According to the Rudrayāmala, there are eight main forms of Bhairava who control the eight directions of this universe. Each form (e.g., Saṃhāra) has a further eight sub-manifestations (e.g., Priyaṅkara), thus resulting in a total of 64 Bhairavas.

When depicting Priyaṅkara according to traditional iconographic rules (śilpaśāstra), one should depcit him (and other forms of Saṃhāra) having a color resembling lightning; he should carry in his hands the kuṇḍa, the kheṭaka, the parigha (a kind of club) and bhiṇḍipāla. The word Śilpaśāstra refers to an ancient Hindu science of arts and crafts, dealing with subjects such as painting, sculpture and iconography.

Shilpashastra book cover
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Shilpashastra (शिल्पशास्त्र, śilpaśāstra) represents the ancient Indian science (shastra) of creative arts (shilpa) such as sculpture, iconography and painting. Closely related to Vastushastra (architecture), they often share the same literature.

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Kavya (poetry)

[«previous next»] — Priyankara in Kavya glossary
Source: Wisdom Library: Kathāsaritsāgara

1) Priyaṅkara (प्रियङ्कर) was a soldier in Sunītha and Sūryaprabha’s whose companion’s strength is considered equal to a great warrior (mahāratha), according to the Kathāsaritsāgara, chapter 47. Accordingly, as the Asura Maya explained the arrangement of warriors in Sunītha’s army: “... the companions of [Priyaṅkara, and others] are great warriors”.

The story of Priyaṅkara was narrated by the Vidyādhara king Vajraprabha to prince Naravāhanadatta in order to relate how “Sūryaprabha, being a man, obtain of old time the sovereignty over the Vidyādharas”.

2) Priyaṅkara (प्रियङ्कर), son of Prabhākara, is the minister of Somaprabha, according to the Kathāsaritsāgara, chapter 58. Accordingly, as Pulastya said in his hermitage: “... and his father Jyotiṣprabha, seeing that he [Somaprabha] was brave, young, beloved by the subjects, and able to bear the weight of empire, gladly anointed him Crown Prince. And he gave him as minister the virtuous Priyaṅkara, the son of his own minister named Prabhākara”.

The story of Priyaṅkara was narrated by Gomukha to Naravāhanadatta in order to demonstrate that “the appointed union of human beings certainly takes place in this world, though vast spaces intervene”.

The Kathāsaritsāgara (‘ocean of streams of story’), mentioning Priyaṅkara, is a famous Sanskrit epic story revolving around prince Naravāhanadatta and his quest to become the emperor of the vidyādharas (celestial beings). The work is said to have been an adaptation of Guṇāḍhya’s Bṛhatkathā consisting of 100,000 verses, which in turn is part of a larger work containing 700,000 verses.

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Kavya (काव्य, kavya) refers to Sanskrit poetry, a popular ancient Indian tradition of literature. There have been many Sanskrit poets over the ages, hailing from ancient India and beyond. This topic includes mahakavya, or ‘epic poetry’ and natya, or ‘dramatic poetry’.

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In Buddhism

Tibetan Buddhism (Vajrayana or tantric Buddhism)

Source: Wisdom Library: Tibetan Buddhism

Priyaṅkara (प्रियङ्कर) is the name of a deity summoned by the Yamāntaka-mantra and mentioned as attending the teachings in the 6th century Mañjuśrīmūlakalpa: one of the largest Kriyā Tantras devoted to Mañjuśrī (the Bodhisattva of wisdom) representing an encyclopedia of knowledge primarily concerned with ritualistic elements in Buddhism. The teachings in this text originate from Mañjuśrī and were taught to and by Buddha Śākyamuni in the presence of a large audience (including Priyaṅkara).

Tibetan Buddhism book cover
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Tibetan Buddhism includes schools such as Nyingma, Kadampa, Kagyu and Gelug. Their primary canon of literature is divided in two broad categories: The Kangyur, which consists of Buddha’s words, and the Tengyur, which includes commentaries from various sources. Esotericism and tantra techniques (vajrayāna) are collected indepently.

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In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

[«previous next»] — Priyankara in Jainism glossary
Source: Wisdom Library: Jainism

Priyaṅkara (प्रियङ्कर) refers to a species of Graiveyaka gods, who are in turn a subclass of the Kalpātīta gods, according to Jain cosmological texts in both the Śvetāmbara and Digambara tradition. The word can also be spelled as Priyaṃkara and it is also known by the name Prītikara. The Kalpātīta (those born beyond heavens) represent a sub-species of the Vaimānika gods, which in turn represents the fourth main classification of devas (gods).

The Graiveyakas (e.g., the Priyaṅkaras) do not bind karmans, are 1-sensed class of beings and have an immovable body, warm splendour, cold lustre, animal state of existence, ānupūrvī and āyus.

Source: archive.org: Trisastisalakapurusacaritra

Priyaṅkara (प्रियङ्कर) is the name of a merchant’s son, according to chapter 5.4 [śāntinātha-caritra] of Hemacandra’s 11th century Triṣaṣṭiśalākāpuruṣacaritra (“lives of the 63 illustrious persons”): a Sanskrit epic poem narrating the history and legends of sixty-three important persons in Jainism.

General definition book cover
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Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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India history and geography

Source: What is India: Epigraphia Indica volume XXXI (1955-56)

Priyaṅkara is one of the Brāhmaṇa donees mentioned in the “Asankhali plates of Narasiṃha II” (1302 A.D.). When a grant was made to a large number of Brāhmaṇas, the chief amongst the donees seems to have been called Pānīyagrāhin especially. In the present record, though all the donees (e.g., Priyaṅkara) are referred to as Pāṇigrāhi-mahājana, their list is headed by a Brāhmaṇa with Pāṇigrahī as his surname.

These copper plates (mentioning Priyaṅkara) were discovered from the house of a Santal inhabitant of Pargana Asankhali in the Mayurbhanj State (Orissa). It was made when king Vīra-Narasiṃhadeva was staying at the Bhairavapura-kaṭaka (city, camp or residence).

India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

[«previous next»] — Priyankara in Marathi glossary
Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

priyaṅkara (प्रियंकर).—a S Exciting or attracting love or regard.

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Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

[«previous next»] — Priyankara in Sanskrit glossary
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Priyaṅkara (प्रियङ्कर).—mfn.

(-raḥ-rī-raṃ) 1. Amiable, exciting or attracting regard. 2. Acting kindly or affectionately to. E. priya beloved, kṛ to make, aff. khacmum aug.; also with aṇ aff. priyakāra .

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Priyaṅkara (प्रियङ्कर):—[priya-ṅkara] (raḥ-rā-raṃ) a. Amiable, attractive, affectionate.

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Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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