Prithvi, aka: Pṛthvī; 13 Definition(s)

Introduction

Prithvi means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit term Pṛthvī can be transliterated into English as Prthvi or Prithvi, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Rasashastra (chemistry and alchemy)

Pṛthvī (पृथ्वी):—One of the sixty-seven Mahauṣadhi, as per Rasaśāstra texts (rasa literature). These drugs are useful for processing mercury (rasa), such as the alchemical processes known as sūta-bandhana and māraṇa.

(Source): Wisdom Library: Rasa-śāstra
Rasashastra book cover
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Rasaśāstra (रसशास्त्र, rasashastra) is an important branch of Ayurveda, specialising in chemical interactions with herbs, metals and minerals. Some texts combine yogic and tantric practices with various alchemical operations. The ultimate goal of Rasashastra is not only to preserve and prolong life, but also to bestow wealth upon humankind.

Yoga (school of philosophy)

Pṛthvī (पृथ्वी, “earth”):—One of the five gross elements assigned as a zone (or sphere) to the human body (bhūtamaṇḍala), according the Yogatattva-upaniṣad. The element earth is assigned to the region from the feet up to the knees. Earth is represented by a square (caturasra), the colour yellow (pīta) and the syllable la (ल). The deity presiding over this region is Brahmā;

(Source): Wisdom Library: Yoga
Yoga book cover
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Originally, Yoga is considered a branch of orthodox Hindu philosophy (astika), but both ancient and modern Yoga combine the physical, mental and spiritual. Yoga teaches various physical techniques also known as āsanas (postures), used for various purposes (eg., meditation, contemplation, relaxation).

Ayurveda (science of life)

Pṛthvī (पृथ्वी) is another name for Punarnavā, which is a Sanskrit word referring to Boerhavia diffusa (spreading hogweed) from the Nyctaginaceae family. It is classified as a medicinal plant in the system of Āyurveda (science of Indian medicine) and is used throughout literature such as the Suśrutasaṃhita and the Carakasaṃhitā. The synonym was identified in the Rājanighaṇṭu (verses 4.117-119), which is a 13th-century medicinal thesaurus.

(Source): Wisdom Library: Āyurveda and botany
Ayurveda book cover
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Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

Purāṇa

1a) Pṛthvī (पृथ्वी).—First milked by Brahmā; Calf Vāyu; In Svāyambhuvamanvantara by Agnidhara—Calf Svāyambhuva. In Svārociṣa by Caitra—Calf Svārociṣa Manu. In Uttama by Devabhuja—Calf Uttama Manu. In Tāmasa by Bālabandhu—Calf Tāmasa Manu. In Cāriṣṇava by Purāṇa—Calf Cariṣṇava Manu. In Cākṣuṣa by Purāṇa— Calf Cākṣuṣa Manu. In Vaivasvata by Vainya—Calf Soma.*

  • * Vāyu-purāṇa 63. 12-19.

1b) The first seven vātaskandas; also known as āhava.*

  • * Vāyu-purāṇa 67. 114.
(Source): Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index
Purāṇa book cover
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The Purāṇas (पुराण, purana) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahāpurāṇas total over 400,000 ślokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

Śilpaśāstra (iconography)

Pṛthvī (पृथ्वी) is a synonym for adhiṣṭhāna (‘platform’), according to the Kāśyapaśilpa 6.1-2. The word adhiṣṭhāna is Sanskrit technical term referring to the “base” or “platform” on which a structure is built.

(Source): Wisdom Library: Śilpa-śāstra
Śilpaśāstra book cover
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Śilpaśāstra (शिल्पशास्त्र, shilpa-shastra) represents the ancient Indian science of creative arts such as sculpture, iconography and painting. Closely related to Vāstuśāstra (architecture), they often share the same literature.

Discover the meaning of prithvi or prthvi in the context of Shilpashastra from relevant books on Exotic India

Vaiśeṣika (school of philosophy)

Pṛthvī (पृथ्वी, “earth”) is one of the nine dravyas (‘substances’), according to the Vaiśeṣika-sūtras. These dravyas are considered as a category of padārtha (“metaphysical correlate”). These padārthas represent everything that exists which can be cognized and named. Together with their subdivisions, they attempt to explain the nature of the universe and the existence of living beings. Pṛthvī is also regarded as one of the five bhūtas (‘elements’) possessing a specific quality making it cognizable.

(Source): Wikipedia: Vaisheshika
Vaiśeṣika book cover
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Vaiśeṣika (वैशेषिक, vaisheshika) refers to a school of orthodox Hindu philosophy (āstika), drawing its subject-matter from the Upaniṣads. Vaiśeṣika deals with subjects such as logic, epistemology, philosophy and expounds concepts similair to Buddhism in nature

Nāṭyaśāstra (theatrics and dramaturgy)

Pṛthvī (पृथ्वी) is another name for Vilambitagati, which refers to a type of syllabic metre (vṛtta), according to the Nāṭyaśāstra chapter 16. In this metre, the second, the sixth, the eighth, the twelfth, the fourteenth, the fifteenth and the seventeenth syllables of a foot (pāda) are heavy (guru), while the rest of the syllables are light (laghu).

⏑⎼⏑¦⏑⏑⎼¦⏑⎼⏑¦⏑⏑⎼¦⏑⎼⎼¦⏑⎼¦¦⏑⎼⏑¦⏑⏑⎼¦⏑⎼⏑¦⏑⏑⎼¦⏑⎼⎼¦⏑⎼¦¦
⏑⎼⏑¦⏑⏑⎼¦⏑⎼⏑¦⏑⏑⎼¦⏑⎼⎼¦⏑⎼¦¦⏑⎼⏑¦⏑⏑⎼¦⏑⎼⏑¦⏑⏑⎼¦⏑⎼⎼¦⏑⎼¦¦

Pṛthvī falls in the Atyaṣṭi class of chandas (rhythm-type), which implies that verses constructed with this metre have four pādas (‘foot’ or ‘quarter-verse’) containing seventeen syllables each.

(Source): Wisdom Library: Nāṭya-śāstra

Pṛthvī (पृथ्वी) is the name of a Sanskrit metre (chandas) of the Vṛtta-type (akṣarachandas: metres regulated by akṣaras, syllabes).—This metre, Pṛthvī with seventeen syllables in each quarter and the gaṇas therein are in the order of ja, sa, ja, sa and ya. This metre is found to be employed in the Śrīkaṇṭhacarita.

(Source): Shodhganga: Mankhaka a sanskrit literary genius (natya)
Nāṭyaśāstra book cover
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Nāṭyaśāstra (नाट्यशास्त्र, natya-shastra) refers to both the ancient Indian tradition of performing arts, (e.g., theatrics, drama, dance, music), as well as the name of a Sanskrit work dealing with these subjects. It also teaches the rules for composing dramatic plays (nāṭya) and poetic works (kāvya).

Chandas (prosody, study of Sanskrit metres)

1) Pṛthvī (पृथ्वी) refers to one of the 27 metres mentioned in Kṣemendra’s Suvṛttatilaka. The Suvṛttatilaka is a monumental work of Sanskrit prosody considered as unique in its nature. In this work Kṣemendra neither introduces any new metre nor discusses all the metres used in his time. He discusses 27 popular metres (eg., Pṛthvī) which were used frequently by the poets.

2) Pṛthvī (पृथ्वी) is the alternative name of a Sanskrit metre (chandas) mentioned by Hemacandra (1088-1173 C.E.) in his auto-commentary on the second chapter of the Chandonuśāsana. Pṛthvī corresponds to Vilambitagati (according to Barata). Hemacandra gives these alternative names for the metres by other authorities (like Bharata), even though the number of gaṇas or letters do not differ. This is a peculiar feature of Sanskrit prosody.

(Source): Shodhganga: a concise history of Sanskrit Chanda literature
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Chandas (छन्दस्) refers to Sanskrit prosody and represents one of the six Vedangas (auxiliary disciplines belonging to the study of the Vedas). The science of prosody (chandas-shastra) focusses on the study of the poetic meters such as the commonly known twenty-six metres mentioned by Pingalas.

General definition (in Hinduism)

Prithvi is the Sanskrit name for earth and its essence Prithivi Tattwa, in the name of a Hindu Deity. Prithvi is also called Dhra, Dharti, Dhrithri, meaning that which holds everything. Amongst lokas (worlds), it is also known as Bhu-loka.

etymology: Prithvi (Sanskrit: पृथ्वी pṛthvī, also पृथिवी pṛthivī).

(Source): WikiPedia: Hinduism

In Buddhism

General definition (in Buddhism)

Pṛthvī (पृथ्वी) refers to the thirteenth of the “fourteen world protectors” (caturdaśalokapāla) as defined in the Dharma-saṃgraha (section 10). The Dharma-samgraha (Dharmasangraha) is an extensive glossary of Buddhist technical terms in Sanskrit (eg., caturdaśalokapāla and Pṛthvī). The work is attributed to Nagarguna who lived around the 2nd century A.D.

Pṛthvī (”solid“) refers to one of the “eleven tangibles” (spraṣṭavya) as defined in the Dharma-saṃgraha (section 38).

Pṛthvī (“earth”) also refers to one of the “five great elements” (mahābhūta) as well as one of the “six elements” (ṣaḍdhātu), defined in the Dharma-saṃgraha (section 39 and 58 respectively).

(Source): Wisdom Library: Dharma-samgraha

In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

1) Pṛthvī  (पृथ्वी) is the mother of Supārśva, the seventh of twenty-four Tīrthaṅkaras in Janism according to the Ācāradinakara (14th century work on Jain conduct written by Vardhamāna Sūri). A Tīrthaṅkara is an enlightened being who has conquered saṃsāra (cycle of birth and death), leaving behind him a path for others to follow.

The husband of Pṛthvī is Pratiṣṭha according to Śvetāmbara but Supratiṣṭha according to Digambara. It is an ancient Jain practice to worship the Tīrthaṅkara’s parents in various rites, such as the pratiṣṭhāvidhi.

2) Pṛthvī (पृथ्वी) is the mother of Svayambhū: the third Vāsudeva (“violent heroes”) according to both Śvetāmbara and Digambara sources. Since they enjoy half the power of a Cakravartin (universal monarch) they are also known as Ardhacakrins. Jain legends describe nine such Vāsudevas usually appearing together with their “gentler” twins known as the Baladevas. The legends of these twin-heroes usually involve their antagonistic counterpart known as the Prativāsudevas (anti-heroes).

The stories of queen Pṛthvī, king Soma and their son, Svayambhū are related in texts such as the Triṣaṣṭiśalākāpuruṣacarita (“the lives of the sixty-three illustrious persons”), a twelfth-century Śvetāmbara work by Hemacandra.

(Source): Wisdom Library: Jainism

Pṛthvī (पृथ्वी) is the mother of Indrabhūti, Agnibhūti and Vāyubhūti: the first trough third of the eleven gaṇadharas (group-leader) of Mahāvīra.—Śramaṇa Lord Mahāvīra’s congregation had 11 gaṇadharas. All these were Brahmin householders from different places. All these gaṇadharas (for example, Indrabhūti, Agnibhūti and Vāyubhūti) were Brahmins by caste and Vedic scholars. After taking initiation, they all studied the 11 Aṅgas. Hence, all of them had the knowledge of the 14 pūrvas and possessed special attainments (labdhis).

(Source): HereNow4u: Lord Śrī Mahāvīra
General definition book cover
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Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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