Pravrajita: 15 definitions

Introduction:

Pravrajita means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Ayurveda (science of life)

[«previous next»] — Pravrajita in Ayurveda glossary
Source: WorldCat: Rāj nighaṇṭu

Pravrajitā (प्रव्रजिता) is another name for Śrāvaṇī, an unidentified medicinal plant, according to verse 5.17-18 of the 13th-century Raj Nighantu or Rājanighaṇṭu. The fifth chapter (parpaṭādi-varga) of this book enumerates sixty varieties of smaller plants (kṣudra-kṣupa). Together with the names Pravrajitā and Śrāvaṇī, there are a total of eight Sanskrit synonyms identified for this plant.

Ayurveda book cover
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Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Jyotisha (astronomy and astrology)

[«previous next»] — Pravrajita in Jyotisha glossary
Source: Wisdom Library: Brihat Samhita by Varahamihira

Pravrajita (प्रव्रजित) refers to “ascetics”, according to the Bṛhatsaṃhitā (chapter 9), an encyclopedic Sanskrit work written by Varāhamihira mainly focusing on the science of ancient Indian astronomy astronomy (Jyotiṣa).—Accordingly, “If the course of Mercury should just precede that of Venus, and if Mercury should then have either disappeared or reappeared, there will be rain in the land; diseases and bilious jaundice will afflict mankind; the crops of Grīṣma will flourish; ascetics [i.e., pravrajita], persons who have performed sacrificial rites, physicians, dancers or wrestlers, horses, the Vaiśyas, cows, rulers in their chariots and all yellow objects will perish and the west will suffer”.

Jyotisha book cover
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Jyotisha (ज्योतिष, jyotiṣa or jyotish) refers to ‘astronomy’ or “Vedic astrology” and represents the fifth of the six Vedangas (additional sciences to be studied along with the Vedas). Jyotisha concerns itself with the study and prediction of the movements of celestial bodies, in order to calculate the auspicious time for rituals and ceremonies.

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Kavya (poetry)

[«previous next»] — Pravrajita in Kavya glossary
Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions (kavya)

Pravrajitā (प्रव्रजिता) refers to “mendicant ladies”, according to Bāṇa’s Kādambarī (p. 226).—There are apparently several Tantric rites that Bāṇa pejoratively associates with the priest: [...] “his ear-cavities were punched by those possessed by Piśāca-demons, who had run to him when struck by white mustard seed he had empowered with mantras more than once”; “he had used magic powders for snaring women many times on aging mendicant ladies (jarat-pravrajitā), who having arrived from other lands retired [there to rest]”.

Kavya book cover
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Kavya (काव्य, kavya) refers to Sanskrit poetry, a popular ancient Indian tradition of literature. There have been many Sanskrit poets over the ages, hailing from ancient India and beyond. This topic includes mahakavya, or ‘epic poetry’ and natya, or ‘dramatic poetry’.

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In Buddhism

Mahayana (major branch of Buddhism)

[«previous next»] — Pravrajita in Mahayana glossary
Source: Wisdom Library: Maha Prajnaparamita Sastra

Pravrajita (प्रव्रजित) refers to “mendicants”, according to Mahāprajñāpāramitāśāstra (chapter 19).—Accordingly, “The Buddha said: ‘In the world, there are two men hard to find (durabhisaṃbhava): i) among the mendicants (pravrajita), a definitively liberated (asamayavimukta) Bhikṣu; ii) among the householders (gṛhasthāvadātavasana), a man who knows how to practice pure generosity’. [...]”.

Source: academia.edu: A Study and Translation of the Gaganagañjaparipṛcchā

Pravrajita (प्रव्रजित) refers to a “monk”, according to the Gaganagañjaparipṛcchā: the eighth chapter of the Mahāsaṃnipāta (a collection of Mahāyāna Buddhist Sūtras).—Accordingly: “Son of good family, the king Puṇyālaṃkāra, having seen the Bodhisattva Siṃhavikrāntagāmin’s power of supernatural knowledges, merits and knowledges, handed over the crown to his son called Jayamati. Then, with conviction, he left ordinary household life behind and became a monk (pravrajita), and thought: ‘[...]’”.

Mahayana book cover
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Mahayana (महायान, mahāyāna) is a major branch of Buddhism focusing on the path of a Bodhisattva (spiritual aspirants/ enlightened beings). Extant literature is vast and primarely composed in the Sanskrit language. There are many sūtras of which some of the earliest are the various Prajñāpāramitā sūtras.

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India history and geography

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary

Pravrajita.—(CII 1; LL), a Buddhist monk; an ascetic. Note: pravrajita is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

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Pravrajitā.—(LL), a Buddhist nun. Note: pravrajitā is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

[«previous next»] — Pravrajita in Sanskrit glossary
Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Pravrajita (प्रव्रजित).—p. p.

1) Gone abroad or into exile.

2) Turned a recluse.

-taḥ 1 A religious mendicant or ascetic in general.

2) Especially, a Brāhmaṇa who has entered on the fourth (bhikṣu) order.

3) The pupil of a Jaina or Buddhist mendicant.

-tā 1 A female ascetic.

2) A spikenard.

-tam Turning a recluse, the life of a religious mendicant.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Pravrajita (प्रव्रजित).—m.

(-taḥ) 1. An ascetic or mendicant. 2. The pupil, or attendant of a Jaina or Bauddha mendicant. f.

(-tā) 1. A female devotee or ascetic. 2. Spikenard, (Valeriana Jatamansi) 3. A plant, commonly Mundiri, (Sphœranthus molis.) n.

(-taṃ) The life of an ascetic. E. pra before, vraj to go, aff. kta .

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Pravrajita (प्रव्रजित).—[adjective] gone abroad; [masculine] religious mendicant, ascetic.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Pravrajita (प्रव्रजित):—[=pra-vrajita] [from pra-vrajana > pra-vraj] mfn. gone astray or abroad, [Rāmāyaṇa; Kāśikā-vṛtti on Pāṇini 2-3, 38]

2) [v.s. ...] run away (said of horses), [Mahābhārata]

3) [v.s. ...] (also with vanam) one who has left home to become a religious mendicant or (with Jainas) to become a monk, [Manu-smṛti; Mahābhārata; Hemacandra’s Pariśiṣṭaparvan]

4) [v.s. ...] m. a religious mendicant or a monk, [Mahābhārata; Varāha-mihira; Suśruta]

5) Pravrajitā (प्रव्रजिता):—[=pra-vrajitā] [from pra-vrajita > pra-vrajana > pra-vraj] f. a female ascetic or a nun, [Yājñavalkya; Varāha-mihira; Kādambarī; Sāhitya-darpaṇa]

6) [v.s. ...] Nardostachys Jatamansi, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

7) [v.s. ...] another plant (muṇḍīrī), [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

8) Pravrajita (प्रव्रजित):—[=pra-vrajita] [from pra-vrajana > pra-vraj] n. the life of a religious mendicant, [Mahābhārata]

9) Pravrājita (प्रव्राजित):—[=pra-vrājita] [from pra-vrāj > pra-vraj] mfn. become a monk, [Divyāvadāna]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Pravrajita (प्रव्रजित):—[pra-vrajita] (taḥ) 1. m. An ascetic; the pupil of a Jaina mendicant. f. () Female devotee; spikenard.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Pravrajita (प्रव्रजित) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit words: Pavvaia, Pavvāia, Pavvāviya.

[Sanskrit to German]

Pravrajita in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Kannada-English dictionary

[«previous next»] — Pravrajita in Kannada glossary
Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Pravrajita (ಪ್ರವ್ರಜಿತ):—[adjective] going from place to place; wandering; touring.

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Pravrajita (ಪ್ರವ್ರಜಿತ):—

1) [noun] a wandering, religious ascetic.

2) [noun] the state or life of an ascetic who has renounced the worldly life in search of spiritual life.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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