Pratishthapya, Pratiṣṭhāpya, Prati-shthapya: 5 definitions

Introduction:

Pratishthapya means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit term Pratiṣṭhāpya can be transliterated into English as Pratisthapya or Pratishthapya, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Pancaratra (worship of Nārāyaṇa)

[«previous next»] — Pratishthapya in Pancaratra glossary
Source: Universität Wien: Sudarśana's Worship at the Royal Court According to the Ahirbudhnyasaṃhitā

Pratiṣṭhāpya (प्रतिष्ठाप्य) refers to “installation (of an image)” (as opposed to Apratiṣṭhāpya—‘not having installed’), according to the Ahirbudhnyasaṃhitā, belonging to the Pāñcarātra tradition which deals with theology, rituals, iconography, narrative mythology and others.—Accordingly, “Having had [an image of] Sudarśana with such various aspects constructed, [but] having not installed (apratiṣṭhāpya) [the image properly], the Kings and ministers will at once lose [all their] wealth and be defeated by [their] enemies. Because of the absence of worship they will [eventually] be banished from the kingdom and persecuted”.

Pancaratra book cover
context information

Pancaratra (पाञ्चरात्र, pāñcarātra) represents a tradition of Hinduism where Narayana is revered and worshipped. Closeley related to Vaishnavism, the Pancaratra literature includes various Agamas and tantras incorporating many Vaishnava philosophies.

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In Buddhism

Mahayana (major branch of Buddhism)

[«previous next»] — Pratishthapya in Mahayana glossary
Source: De Gruyter: A Buddhist Ritual Manual on Agriculture

Pratiṣṭhāpya (प्रतिष्ठाप्य) refers to “having placed (one’s knee on the ground)”, according to the Vajratuṇḍasamayakalparāja, an ancient Buddhist ritual manual on agriculture from the 5th-century (or earlier), containing various instructions for the Sangha to provide agriculture-related services to laypeople including rain-making, weather control and crop protection.—Accordingly, [after the Bhagavān entered the assembly of Nāgas], “Then the great Nāga king Samantākāracchatrākaraparikara arose from his seat, arranged his outer robe on one shoulder, placed (pratiṣṭhāpya) his right knee on the ground, approached the Bhagavān and, having bowed down at his feet, circumambulated him three times, and worshipped the Bhagavān with different flowers, fragrances, garlands, ointments, ornaments and cloths. Having worshipped him, he sat down in front of him”.

Mahayana book cover
context information

Mahayana (महायान, mahāyāna) is a major branch of Buddhism focusing on the path of a Bodhisattva (spiritual aspirants/ enlightened beings). Extant literature is vast and primarely composed in the Sanskrit language. There are many sūtras of which some of the earliest are the various Prajñāpāramitā sūtras.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

[«previous next»] — Pratishthapya in Sanskrit glossary
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Pratiṣṭhāpya (प्रतिष्ठाप्य):—[=prati-ṣṭhāpya] mfn. to be placed or located or fixed, [Taittirīya-saṃhitā; Aitareya-brāhmaṇa]

2) [v.s. ...] to be consigned or transferred or entrusted to ([locative case]), [Mahābhārata]

[Sanskrit to German]

Pratishthapya in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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