Prasphurat: 2 definitions

Introduction:

Prasphurat means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

[«previous next»] — Prasphurat in Shaktism glossary
Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

Prasphurat (प्रस्फुरत्) [Cf. Sphurat] refers to “foremost splendour [?]”, according to the Śrīmatottara-tantra, an expansion of the Kubjikāmatatantra: the earliest popular and most authoritative Tantra of the Kubjikā cult.—Accordingly, “The rays in the great lotus of sixteen spokes are the rays [i.e., marīci] which are the energies. The supreme goddess is in the End of the Sixteen and she is the supreme seventeenth (energy). The goddess in the End of the Twelve (dvādaśānta) is Mālinī in the form of the Point. She stands in front [i.e., prasphurat] in the form of the spread tail of a peacock (mayūracandrikā). She always stands before the eyes and (in the form of) many desires she is whirling about (vibhramā). In a moment, time and again, she generates desire in the form of the Point”.

Shaktism book cover
context information

Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Jyotisha (astronomy and astrology)

[«previous next»] — Prasphurat in Jyotisha glossary
Source: Wisdom Library: Brihat Samhita by Varahamihira

Prasphurat (प्रस्फुरत्) refers to “exhibiting” [i.e., that which ‘exhibits’ the ‘movement’ of water-creatures], according to the Bṛhatsaṃhitā (chapter 12), an encyclopedic Sanskrit work written by Varāhamihira mainly focusing on the science of ancient Indian astronomy astronomy (Jyotiṣa).—Accordingly, “The mighty ocean whose waters were swallowed by Agastya, exhibited gems that eclipsed the splendour of the crowns of the Devas [...] It exhibited [i.e., prasphurat] whales, water elephants, rivers and gems scattered over its bed, and, though deprived of water, presented an appearance splendid as Devaloka. There were also seen, moving to and fro [i.e., pracalat], whales, pearl oysters and conch shells, and the sea altogether looked like a summer lake with its moving waves, water lilies and swans”.

Jyotisha book cover
context information

Jyotisha (ज्योतिष, jyotiṣa or jyotish) refers to ‘astronomy’ or “Vedic astrology” and represents the fifth of the six Vedangas (additional sciences to be studied along with the Vedas). Jyotisha concerns itself with the study and prediction of the movements of celestial bodies, in order to calculate the auspicious time for rituals and ceremonies.

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