Prananatha, Prāṇanātha, Prana-natha: 15 definitions

Introduction:

Prananatha means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Vaishnavism (Vaishava dharma)

Source: Pure Bhakti: Bhajana-rahasya - 2nd Edition

Prāṇanātha (प्राणनाथ) or Prāṇeśvara refers to:—Literally means ‘the lord of one’s life’, but it carries the sense of one who is infinitely dearer to one than one’s own life. (cf. Glossary page from Bhajana-Rahasya).

Source: Pure Bhakti: Brhad Bhagavatamrtam

Prāṇanātha (प्राणनाथ) refers to:—The lord of one’s life; it carries the sense of one who is infinitely more dear to one than one’s own life. (cf. Glossary page from Śrī Bṛhad-bhāgavatāmṛta).

Vaishnavism book cover
context information

Vaishnava (वैष्णव, vaiṣṇava) or vaishnavism (vaiṣṇavism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshipping Vishnu as the supreme Lord. Similar to the Shaktism and Shaivism traditions, Vaishnavism also developed as an individual movement, famous for its exposition of the dashavatara (‘ten avatars of Vishnu’).

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Rasashastra (chemistry and alchemy)

Source: Wisdom Library: Rasa-śāstra

Prāṇanātha (प्राणनाथ) or Prāṇanātharasa is the name of an Ayurvedic recipe defined in the fifth volume of the Rasajalanidhi (chapter 2, Rajayakshma: phthisis). These remedies are classified as Iatrochemistry and form part of the ancient Indian science known as Rasaśāstra (medical alchemy). However, since it is an ayurveda treatment it should be taken with caution and in accordance with rules laid down in the texts.

Accordingly, when using such recipes (e.g., prāṇanātha-rasa): “the minerals (uparasa), poisons (viṣa), and other drugs (except herbs), referred to as ingredients of medicines, are to be duly purified and incinerated, as the case may be, in accordance with the processes laid out in the texts.” (see introduction to Iatro chemical medicines)

Rasashastra book cover
context information

Rasashastra (रसशास्त्र, rasaśāstra) is an important branch of Ayurveda, specialising in chemical interactions with herbs, metals and minerals. Some texts combine yogic and tantric practices with various alchemical operations. The ultimate goal of Rasashastra is not only to preserve and prolong life, but also to bestow wealth upon humankind.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

[«previous next»] — Prananatha in Marathi glossary
Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

prāṇanātha (प्राणनाथ).—m Terms of endearment for one's husband or gallant.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

prāṇanātha (प्राणनाथ).—m Terms of endearment for one's husband or gallant.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

[«previous next»] — Prananatha in Sanskrit glossary
Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Prāṇanātha (प्राणनाथ).—

1) a lover, husband.

2) an epithet of Yama.

Derivable forms: prāṇanāthaḥ (प्राणनाथः).

Prāṇanātha is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms prāṇa and nātha (नाथ).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Prāṇanātha (प्राणनाथ).—m.

(-thaḥ) A husband. E. prāṇa life and nātha lord.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Prāṇanātha (प्राणनाथ).—m. a husband.

Prāṇanātha is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms prāṇa and nātha (नाथ).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Prāṇanātha (प्राणनाथ).—[masculine] lord of life, i.e. husband, lover.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Aufrecht Catalogus Catalogorum

1) Prāṇanātha (प्राणनाथ) as mentioned in Aufrecht’s Catalogus Catalogorum:—of Mālava: Sādhakasarvasva [tantric]

2) Prāṇanātha (प्राणनाथ):—son of Jīvanātha: Daivajñabhūṣaṇa.

3) Prāṇanātha (प्राणनाथ):—composed in 1827: Vaidyadarpaṇa.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Prāṇanātha (प्राणनाथ):—[=prāṇa-nātha] [from prāṇa > prān] m. (ifc. f(ā). ), ‘lord of life’, a husband, lover, [Amaru-śataka]

2) [v.s. ...] Name of Yama, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

3) [v.s. ...] Name of a heresiarch (who had a controversy with Śaṃkara at Prayāga), [Catalogue(s)]

4) [v.s. ...] (with vaidya) Name of an author of sub voce [medicine] works.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Prāṇanātha (प्राणनाथ):—[prāṇa-nātha] (thaḥ) 1. m. A husband.

[Sanskrit to German]

Prananatha in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Kannada-English dictionary

[«previous next»] — Prananatha in Kannada glossary
Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Prāṇanātha (ಪ್ರಾಣನಾಥ):—

1) [noun] a man as related to his wife; a husband.

2) [noun] Yama, the Divine Law-Giver.

3) [noun] Śiva, the Supreme Being.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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