Pramatri, Pramātṛ: 11 definitions

Introduction:

Pramatri means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit term Pramātṛ can be transliterated into English as Pramatr or Pramatri, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

Pramātṛ (प्रमातृ) refers to “that person to which something is revealed”, according to the Tantrāloka.—While the Lord reveals himself in all his fullness to a certain person (pramātṛ), to some other (he does so) part by part, progressively. The revelation of one's own nature, consisting of that one being which is the being of all things, is for individual souls Supreme Knowledge. Inferior and multiple (is the knowledge that is) other than that. And that (knowledge) is revealed through the means that is direct as well as (those which are) a means to that (direct means); so it is that (the means to realisation) is divided into various (and wonderful) (vicitra) aspects.

Shaktism book cover
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Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram (shaivism)

Pramātṛ (प्रमातृ) refers to the “perceiving subject”, according to the Mahānayaprakāśa by Arṇasiṃha (Cf. verse 182-197).—Accordingly, “The supreme arising of the Wheel of Emanation  has (also) been explained from this, the aforementioned point of view, to be the supreme expansion (of consciousness) that is incomparable and void of (phenomenal) existence. Those rays of consciousness that, luminous, free of phenomenal signs and limitations are the sole cause of the outpouring of the four levels of Speech, are the best of Siddhas, namely, Khagendra and the rest who, always free of the perception of duality, reside in the abode of the Void (of pure consciousness) in the form of the perceiving subject (pramātṛ-vapuṣa). [...]”

Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions

1) Pramātṛ (प्रमातृ) refers to the “loci of perception” [Cf. Parapramātṛ—“pure awareness” ?], and represents of the fifth division of the Self, according to Kṣemarāja’s Pratyabhijñāhṛdaya (chapter 7-8).

2) Pramātṛ (प्रमातृ) refers to the “(highest) authority”, according to Jayaratha ad Nityāṣoḍaśikārṇava verse 4.14.—Accordingly, “Then leaving behind the kula, i.e. the body, she goes to the one who is in the realm of akula, the supreme, i.e. full […] Person, the highest authority (pramātṛparaṃ pramātāram), who is without a body and without bodily form, with his innate nature manifest and therefore lacking qualities, i.e. she reaches oneness with Him. This is the meaning [of this verse]”.

Shaivism book cover
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Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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India history and geography

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary

Pramātṛ.—(BL), same as Pramātāra, Pramattavāra (q. v.); a civil judge, according to some (HD); cf. Ep. Ind., Vol. XVII, p. 321; literally, ‘measurer [of the king's grain share]’. Note: pramātṛ is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as mythology, zoology, royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Pramātṛ (प्रमातृ).—a.

1) Having a right notion, competent to judge or ascertain.

2) An authority, proof.

3) Demonstrating.

4) A civil judge; EI XVII.321.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Pramātṛ (प्रमातृ).—mfn. (-tā-trī-tṛ) Proving, evidence, who or what is proof or authority. E. pra before, to measure, tṛc aff.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Pramātṛ (प्रमातृ).—[pra-mā + tṛ], m. One who knows well, an authority, [Vedāntasāra, (in my Chrestomathy.)] in Chr. 202, 13.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Pramātṛ (प्रमातृ).—[masculine] a person fit to perceive or judge; an authority, a proof (ph.).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Pramātṛ (प्रमातृ):—[=pra-mātṛ] [from pra-mā] 1. pra-mātṛ mfn. (for 2. See [column]2) one who has a correct notion or idea, authority, performer of (the mental operation resulting in a) true conception, [Kapila [Scholiast or Commentator]; Vedāntasāra; Sarvadarśana-saṃgraha] (-tā f., [Sarvadarśana-saṃgraha]; -tva n., [Śaṃkarācārya])

2) [v.s. ...] a [particular] class of officials, [Inscriptions]

3) [=pra-mātṛ] 2. pra-mātṛ f. (for 1. See [column]1) the mother’s mother, [Viṣṇu-purāṇa]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Pramātṛ (प्रमातृ):—[pra-mātṛ] (tā-trī-tṛ) a. Proving.

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Pramātṛ (ಪ್ರಮಾತೃ):—[noun] = ಪ್ರಮಾತ [pramata].

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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