Prakirtita, Prakīrtita: 8 definitions

Introduction:

Prakirtita means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit, the history of ancient India. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

[«previous next»] — Prakirtita in Shaktism glossary
Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

Prakīrtita (प्रकीर्तित) refers to “that which is said to be”, according to the Kulakaulinīmata verse 4.71-75.—Accordingly, “(Kuṇḍalinī) bestows (marital) bliss and so is said [i.e., prakīrtita] to be Nityā (the Eternal Woman). She brings about growth (and development) and is the eternal (nityā) mother of the universe who instills certainty. She is the eternal Transmental. Devoid of the universe of thought constructs, she resides in the life breath of all. She is the supreme energy, called Kuṇḍalā and is the seventeenth energy (of the Moon). [...]”.

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Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

[«previous next»] — Prakirtita in Shaivism glossary
Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions

Prakīrtita (प्रकीर्तित) refers to “that which is (said) to be”, according to the 9th-century Sarvajñānottaratantra chapter 18.—Accordingly, “Next, I shall teach the best observance among observances, which is known as the Śiva-vrata and which is revered by Asuras and Gods alike. [...] He should be mantra-bodied; the appearance of excellent Sādhakas [who follow this observance] is to be (prakīrtita) the same as that of Śiva: the observance must be understood as consisting in this. Alternatively, he may wear [just] a white loin-cloth, [and bear] a turban, rosary and spouted water-pot. [...]”.

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Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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In Buddhism

Tibetan Buddhism (Vajrayana or tantric Buddhism)

Source: OSU Press: Cakrasamvara Samadhi

Prakīrtita (प्रकीर्तित) refers to “(being) stated”, according to the Cakrasaṃvara Samādhi [i.e., Cakrasamvara Meditation] ritual often performed in combination with the Cakrasaṃvara Samādhi, which refers to the primary pūjā and sādhanā practice of Newah Mahāyāna-Vajrayāna Buddhists in Nepal.—Accordingly, “[...] Possessing the six seals, adorned with a necklace, bracelets, Ear-rings, girdle, a crest jewel, (and) covered in ashes. The six insignia stated (prakīrtita) (are) the purity of the six perfections”.

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Tibetan Buddhism includes schools such as Nyingma, Kadampa, Kagyu and Gelug. Their primary canon of literature is divided in two broad categories: The Kangyur, which consists of Buddha’s words, and the Tengyur, which includes commentaries from various sources. Esotericism and tantra techniques (vajrayāna) are collected indepently.

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In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

[«previous next»] — Prakirtita in Jainism glossary
Source: The University of Sydney: A study of the Twelve Reflections

Prakīrtita (प्रकीर्तित) refers to “that which is called [i.e., ‘said to be’]”, according to the 11th century Jñānārṇava, a treatise on Jain Yoga in roughly 2200 Sanskrit verses composed by Śubhacandra.—Accordingly, “That, which is the restraint of all influx of karma, is called (prakīrtita) ‘stopping the influx of karma’. Further, that is divided in two on account of the distinction between what is physical and what is mental. That, which is the cessation of the acquisition of karmic material of an ascetic, is declared by those whose sins are removed by meditation to be the physical stopping of the influx of karma”.

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Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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India history and geography

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary

Prakīrtita.—(EI 24), built; same as kīrtita. Note: prakīrtita is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

[«previous next»] — Prakirtita in Sanskrit glossary
Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Prakīrtita (प्रकीर्तित).—p. p.

1) Proclaimed.

2) Declared, said to be.

3) Named, called.

4) Celebrated.

5) Explained.

6) Revealed.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Prakīrtita (प्रकीर्तित):—[=pra-kīrtita] [from pra-kīrt] mfn. announced, proclaimed, revealed, stated, said, mentioned, [Manu-smṛti; Yājñavalkya]

2) [v.s. ...] named, called, [Manu-smṛti; Pañcatantra]

3) [v.s. ...] approved, praised, celebrated, [Yājñavalkya; Pañcatantra]

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Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Kannada-English dictionary

[«previous next»] — Prakirtita in Kannada glossary
Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Prakīrtita (ಪ್ರಕೀರ್ತಿತ):—

1) [adjective] proclaimed; announced.

2) [adjective] widely published; advertised.

3) [adjective] renowed, celebrated.

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Prakīrtita (ಪ್ರಕೀರ್ತಿತ):—[noun] that which is, he who is favaourbly reputed; a famous man of thing.

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Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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