Prakashita, Prakāśita: 17 definitions

Introduction:

Prakashita means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi, Hindi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit term Prakāśita can be transliterated into English as Prakasita or Prakashita, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

Alternative spellings of this word include Prakashit.

In Hinduism

Natyashastra (theatrics and dramaturgy)

Source: Wisdom Library: Nāṭya-śāstra

Prakāśitā (प्रकाशिता) is the name of a meter belonging to the Uṣṇik class of Dhruvā (songs) described in the Nāṭyaśāstra chapter 32:—“the metre which has in its feet of seven syllables the fourth, the sixth and the final one long, is called prakāśitā”.

Natyashastra book cover
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Natyashastra (नाट्यशास्त्र, nāṭyaśāstra) refers to both the ancient Indian tradition (śāstra) of performing arts, (nāṭya, e.g., theatrics, drama, dance, music), as well as the name of a Sanskrit work dealing with these subjects. It also teaches the rules for composing dramatic plays (nataka) and poetic works (kavya).

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

[«previous next»] — Prakashita in Shaktism glossary
Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

Prakāśita (प्रकाशित) refers to “revelation” (of secret names), according to the Manthānabhairavatantra, a vast sprawling work that belongs to a corpus of Tantric texts concerned with the worship of the goddess Kubjikā.—Accordingly, “One should worship them [i.e., the Goddesses of the seats] at each door (of the quarters). [...] Worshipped and installed they give extensive accomplishment. One should worship the eight goddesses accompanied by the guardians of the field. Jayā, Vijayā, Ajitā, Aparājitā, Jayantī, Jayalakṣmī, Jayaśrī, and Jayamaṃgalā: these are (their) secret names, revealed [i.e., prakāśita] in the form of mantras. (These are the goddesses) who reside in the doors (of the quarters) and abide in the places of the primary and secondary doors along with the primary and secondary sacred seats, meeting grounds and fields”.

Shaktism book cover
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Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

[«previous next»] — Prakashita in Shaivism glossary
Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions (philosophy)

Prakāśita (प्रकाशित) refers to “manifestation (of an object)” according to the Utpaladeva’s Vivṛti on Īśvarapratyabhijñākārikā 1.5.8-9.—Accordingly, “[...] And this mere [realization that the object is something separated from the subject] is not enough to transform this object into something on which [human] activity may be exerted; therefore [this object] is [also] made manifest (prakāśita) as having a specific place and time, because only a particular having a specific place and time can be something on which [human] activity may be exerted, since [only such a particular] can be obtained (prāpya) and since [only such a particular] may have the efficacy (arthakriyā) that [we] expect [from it]. [...]”.

Shaivism book cover
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Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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Yoga (school of philosophy)

[«previous next»] — Prakashita in Yoga glossary
Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions (yoga)

Prakāśita (प्रकाशित) refers to “(having) revealed” (the secrets of Yoga), according to Śivānandasarasvatī’s Yogacintāmaṇi, a 17th-century text on Haṭhayoga by consisting of 3423 verses.—Accordingly, “[...] I have revealed (prakāśita) here all that which is secret in Haṭha- and Rājayoga for the delight of Yogins. However, that Haṭhayoga which was practised by Uddālaka, Bhuśuṇḍa and others has not been mentioned by me, because it cannot be accomplished by contemporary [practitioners. Also], the procedures and so forth promoted by the kāpālikas have not been mentioned [because] they contravene the Vedas, Dharmaśāstras and Purāṇas”.

Yoga book cover
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Yoga is originally considered a branch of Hindu philosophy (astika), but both ancient and modern Yoga combine the physical, mental and spiritual. Yoga teaches various physical techniques also known as āsanas (postures), used for various purposes (eg., meditation, contemplation, relaxation).

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous next»] — Prakashita in Purana glossary
Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Prakāśita (प्रकाशित) refers to “illuminating (the quarters)” and is used to describe Śiva, according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.3.42 (“Description of the meeting of the Lord and the Mountain”).—Accordingly, as Brahmā narrated to Nārada: “[...] Seeing Śiva in front, Himavat bowed to Him. The mountains and the Brahmins bowed to Sadāśiva. He was seated on his bull, fully bedecked in ornaments and beaming in the face. The beauty of his divine person illuminated (lāvaṇya-prakāśita) the quarters. His body shone in the delicate silken garments. His crown was lustrous with the gems set in it. He was smiling shedding pure brilliance everywhere. [...]”.

Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

[«previous next»] — Prakashita in Marathi glossary
Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

prakāśita (प्रकाशित).—p (S) Enlightened or illumined, lit. fig.; rendered clear, conspicuous, evident, manifest.

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Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

[«previous next»] — Prakashita in Sanskrit glossary
Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Prakāśita (प्रकाशित).—p. p.

1) Made clear or manifestd, displayed, manifested.

2) Published; brought out (as a book).

3) Illuminated, irradiated, enlightened.

4) Visible, evident, apparent.

-tam Light, clearness.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Prakāśita (प्रकाशित).—mfn.

(-taḥ-tā-taṃ) 1. Evident, apparent, manifest, visible. 2. Published, promulgated. 3. Illuminated, inlightened. E. prakāśa manifestation, itac aff.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Prakāśitā (प्रकाशिता).—f., and prakāśitva prakāśitva, n., i. e. prakāśin + tā, or tva, Clearness, light, Mahābhārata 12, 6228; 1, 3576.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Prakāśitā (प्रकाशिता).—[feminine] tva [neuter] clearness, brilliancy.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Prakāśita (प्रकाशित):—[=pra-kāśita] [from pra-kāś] mfn. become visible, brought to light, clear, manifest, apparent, evident

2) [v.s. ...] displayed, unfolded, discovered

3) [v.s. ...] illumined, enlightened, irradiated

4) [v.s. ...] published, promulgated, [Mahābhārata; Rāmāyaṇa; Suśruta] etc.

5) Prakāśitā (प्रकाशिता):—[=pra-kāśi-tā] [from pra-kāśin > pra-kāś] f. clearness, brightness, brilliance, light, [Mahābhārata]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Prakāśita (प्रकाशित):—[pra-kāśita] (taḥ-tā-taṃ) a. Evident, manifested, published.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Prakāśita (प्रकाशित) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit word: Pagāsiya.

[Sanskrit to German]

Prakashita in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Hindi dictionary

[«previous next»] — Prakashita in Hindi glossary
Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

Prakāśita (प्रकाशित) [Also spelled prakashit]:—(a) published; brought to light, manifest, obvious; resplendent.

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Kannada-English dictionary

[«previous next»] — Prakashita in Kannada glossary
Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Prakāśita (ಪ್ರಕಾಶಿತ):—

1) [adjective] illuminated; lighted up; brightened.

2) [adjective] made publicly known; proclaimed.

3) [adjective] published; released (for sale).

4) [adjective] revealed; disclosed; divulged.

5) [adjective] unfolded to the eye; exhibited; displayed.

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Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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