Piyushadhara, Pīyūṣadhārā, Piyusha-dhara: 6 definitions

Introduction:

Piyushadhara means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit term Pīyūṣadhārā can be transliterated into English as Piyusadhara or Piyushadhara, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Jyotisha (astronomy and astrology)

[«previous next»] — Piyushadhara in Jyotisha glossary
Source: Google Books: Studies in the History of the Exact Sciences (Astronomy)

Pīyūṣadhārā (पीयूषधारा) by Govinda Daivajña is a commentary on the Muhūrtacintāmaṇi.—The ritual connected with the setting up of the water clock and its invocation is described, albeit briefly, in an unpublished manuscript entitled Ghaṭikāyantraghaṭanāvidhi. [...] Likewise Govinda Daivajña’s Pīyūṣadhārā commentary (AD 1603) on his paternal uncle Rāma Daivajña’s Muhūrtacintāmaṇi (AD 1600) and Kāśīnātha Upādhye’s Dharmasindhu (AD 1790-91) describe the ritual, but with different wording.

Jyotisha book cover
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Jyotisha (ज्योतिष, jyotiṣa or jyotish) refers to ‘astronomy’ or “Vedic astrology” and represents the fifth of the six Vedangas (additional sciences to be studied along with the Vedas). Jyotisha concerns itself with the study and prediction of the movements of celestial bodies, in order to calculate the auspicious time for rituals and ceremonies.

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

[«previous next»] — Piyushadhara in Shaktism glossary
Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

Pīyūṣadhārānta (पीयूषधारान्त) refers to a “stream of nectar”, according to the Manthānabhairavatantra, a vast sprawling work that belongs to a corpus of Tantric texts concerned with the worship of the goddess Kubjikā.—Accordingly, “O you who reside at the End of the Eighteen! (You are) also beyond the state of the Transmental. You are Śāmbhavī who awakens Śambhu. [...] (At the same time) you are on the plane of the current of the state beyond the Transmental. (Your) nature is subtle; your form is that of the beautiful and radiant energy which is the Half Moon. Encompassed by the Triangle, you are in the centre. Born from the limbs of the three lines (of the Triangle), you are completely full and reside in the sacred seat in the centre. O Kubjī, you are Mālinī who awakens (Bhairava) the Gander (haṃsa). (When you are) in the Cavity (in the centre), you are sprinkled inwardly by the stream of nectar of the Śiva principle [i.e., śivatattva-pīyūṣadhārā-anta-saṃsiktā]”

Shaktism book cover
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Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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In Buddhism

Tibetan Buddhism (Vajrayana or tantric Buddhism)

Source: OSU Press: Cakrasamvara Samadhi

Pīyūṣadhārā (पीयूषधारा) refers to a “stream of nectar”, according to the Ṭīkā Pot Worship [i.e., Kalaśapūjā] ritual often performed in combination with the Cakrasaṃvara Samādhi, which refers to the primary pūjā and sādhanā practice of Newah Mahāyāna-Vajrayāna Buddhists in Nepal.—Accordingly, “Rising out across the circle, that kindles the wind, of a hundred shining suns, A burning triad, infatuating the three worlds, an overflowing stream of nectar (pīyūṣadhārā-plutā), Giving her own abundant bliss, having the pure essence of Buddha knowledge, Free from traversing existence and non-existence, beloved sow, drink to you”.

Tibetan Buddhism book cover
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Tibetan Buddhism includes schools such as Nyingma, Kadampa, Kagyu and Gelug. Their primary canon of literature is divided in two broad categories: The Kangyur, which consists of Buddha’s words, and the Tengyur, which includes commentaries from various sources. Esotericism and tantra techniques (vajrayāna) are collected indepently.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

[«previous next»] — Piyushadhara in Sanskrit glossary
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Aufrecht Catalogus Catalogorum

Pīyūṣadhārā (पीयूषधारा) as mentioned in Aufrecht’s Catalogus Catalogorum:—Muhūrtacintāmaṇiṭīkā by Govinda.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Pīyūṣadhārā (पीयूषधारा):—[=pīyūṣa-dhārā] [from pīyūṣa > pīna] f. stream of n°, Name of sub voce works

[Sanskrit to German]

Piyushadhara in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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