Pittha, Piṭṭha: 3 definitions

Introduction

Pittha means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Buddhism, Pali. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

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Pali-English dictionary

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

piṭṭha : (nt.) the back; hind part; surface; flour (of grain, etc.)

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

1) Piṭṭha, 3 (nt.) (cp. Vedic pṛṣṭha, expld by Grassmann as pra-sthā, i.e. what stands out) back, hind part; also surface, top J. I, 167 (pāsāṇa° top of a rock). Usually in oblique cases as adv. , viz. Instr. piṭṭhena along, over, beside, by way of, on J. II, 111 (udaka°); IV, 3 (samudda°), Loc. piṭṭhe by the side of, near, at: parikhā° at a ditch PvA. 201; on, on top of, on the back of (animals): ammaṇassa p. J. VI, 381 (cp. piṭṭhiyaṃ); tiṇa° J. IV, 444; paṅka° J. I, 223; samudda° J. I, 202.—assa° on horseback D. I, 103; similarly: vāraṇassa p. J. I, 358; sīha° J. II, 244; haṭṭhi° J. II, 244; III, 392. See also following. Piṭṭhi & Piṭṭhī (f.) (=piṭṭha3, of which it has taken over the main function as noun. On relation piṭṭha› piṭṭhi cp. Trenckner, Notes 55; Franke, Bezzenberger’s Beiträge XX. 287. Cp. also the Prk. forms piṭṭha, piṭṭhī & piṣṭī, all representing Sk. prṣṭḥa: Pischel, Prk. Gram. §53) 1. the back Vin. II, 200 (piṭṭhī); M. I, 354; J. I, 207; II, 159, 279. piṭṭhiṃ (paccāmittassa) passati to see the (enemy’s) back, i.e. to see the last of somebody J. I, 296, 488; IV, 208. piṭṭhi as opposed to ura (breast) at Vin. II, 105; Sn. 609; as opposed to tala (palm) with ref. to hand & foot: hattha (or pada-) tala & °piṭṭhi: J. IV, 188; Vism. 361.—Abl. piṭṭhito as adv. (from) behind, at the back of Sn. 412 (+anubandhati to follow closely); VvA. 256; PvA. 78 (geha°). piṭṭhito karoti to leave behind, to turn one’s back on J. I, 71 (cp. pṛṣṭhato-mukha Divy 333). piṭṭhito piṭṭhito right on one’s heels, very closely Vin. I, 47; D. I, 1, 226.—2. top, upper side (in which meaning usually piṭṭha3), only in cpd. °pāsāṇa and Loc. piṭṭhiyaṃ as adv. on top of J. V, 297 (ammaṇa°) piṭṭhi at VvA. 101 is evidently faulty reading.—ācariya teacher’s understudy, pupil-teacher, tutor J. II, 100; V, 458, 473, 501.—kaṇṭaka spina dorsi, backbone M. I, 58, 80, 89; III, 92; Vism. 271; VbhA. 243; KhA 49 sq.; Sdhp. 102.—koṭṭhaka an upper room (bath room?) DhA. II, 19, 20.—gata following behind, foll. One’s example Vism. 47.—paṇṇasālā a leaf-hut at the back J. VI, 545.—parikamma treating one’s back (by rubbing) Vin. II, 106.—passe (Loc.) at the back of, behind J. I, 292; PvA. 55, 83, 106.—pāda the back of the foot, lit. foot-back, i.e. the heel Vism. 251; KhA 51, (°aṭṭhika); DA. I, 254.—pāsāṇa a flat stone or rock, plateau, ridge J. I, 278; II, 352; VI, 279; DhA. II, 58; VbhA. 5, 266.—bāha the back of the arm, i.e. elbow (cp. °pāda) KhA 49, 50 (°aṭṭhi): —maṃsa the flesh of the back PvA. 210; SnA 287.—maṃsika backbiting, one who talks behind a person’s back Sn. 244 (=°maṃsakhādaka C.); J. II, 186 (of an unfair judge); V, 1; Pv III, 97 (BB; T. °aka). As °maṃsiya at J. V, 10.—maṃsikȧtā backbiting Nd2 39.—roga back-ache SnA 111.—vaṃsa back bone, a certain beam in a building DhA. I, 52. (Page 457)

2) Piṭṭha, 2 (nt.) (identical in form with piṭṭha3) a lintel (of a door) Vin. I, 47 (kavāṭa°); II, 120 (°saṅghāṭa, cp. Vin. Texts III, 105), 148, 207. (Page 457)

3) Piṭṭha, 1 (nt.) (pp. of piṃsati2. cp. Sk. piṣṭa) what is ground, grindings, crushed seeds, flour. Vin. I, 201, 203; IV, 261, 341 (tila°=piññāka); J. II, 244 (māsa°). As piṭṭhi at J. I, 347.—khādaniya “flour-eatables, ” i.e. pastry Vin. I, 248 (cp. Vin. Texts II. 139).—dhītalikā a flour-doll, i.e. made of paste or a lump of flour PvA. 16, 19 (cp. uddāna to the 1st vagga p. 67 piṭṭhi & reading piṇḍa° on p. 17).—piṇḍi a lump of flour Vism. 500 (in comp.).—madda flour paste Vin. II, 151 (expld in C. by piṭṭha-khali; cp. piṭṭhi-madda J. III, 226, which would correspond to piṣṭī).—surā (intoxicating) extract or spirits of flour VvA. 73. (Page 457)

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1) Piṭṭha, 3 (nt.) (cp. Vedic pṛṣṭha, expld by Grassmann as pra-sthā, i.e. what stands out) back, hind part; also surface, top J. I, 167 (pāsāṇa° top of a rock). Usually in oblique cases as adv. , viz. Instr. piṭṭhena along, over, beside, by way of, on J. II, 111 (udaka°); IV, 3 (samudda°), Loc. piṭṭhe by the side of, near, at: parikhā° at a ditch PvA. 201; on, on top of, on the back of (animals): ammaṇassa p. J. VI, 381 (cp. piṭṭhiyaṃ); tiṇa° J. IV, 444; paṅka° J. I, 223; samudda° J. I, 202.—assa° on horseback D. I, 103; similarly: vāraṇassa p. J. I, 358; sīha° J. II, 244; haṭṭhi° J. II, 244; III, 392. See also following. Piṭṭhi & Piṭṭhī (f.) (=piṭṭha3, of which it has taken over the main function as noun. On relation piṭṭha› piṭṭhi cp. Trenckner, Notes 55; Franke, Bezzenberger’s Beiträge XX. 287. Cp. also the Prk. forms piṭṭha, piṭṭhī & piṣṭī, all representing Sk. prṣṭḥa: Pischel, Prk. Gram. §53) 1. the back Vin. II, 200 (piṭṭhī); M. I, 354; J. I, 207; II, 159, 279. piṭṭhiṃ (paccāmittassa) passati to see the (enemy’s) back, i.e. to see the last of somebody J. I, 296, 488; IV, 208. piṭṭhi as opposed to ura (breast) at Vin. II, 105; Sn. 609; as opposed to tala (palm) with ref. to hand & foot: hattha (or pada-) tala & °piṭṭhi: J. IV, 188; Vism. 361.—Abl. piṭṭhito as adv. (from) behind, at the back of Sn. 412 (+anubandhati to follow closely); VvA. 256; PvA. 78 (geha°). piṭṭhito karoti to leave behind, to turn one’s back on J. I, 71 (cp. pṛṣṭhato-mukha Divy 333). piṭṭhito piṭṭhito right on one’s heels, very closely Vin. I, 47; D. I, 1, 226.—2. top, upper side (in which meaning usually piṭṭha3), only in cpd. °pāsāṇa and Loc. piṭṭhiyaṃ as adv. on top of J. V, 297 (ammaṇa°) piṭṭhi at VvA. 101 is evidently faulty reading.—ācariya teacher’s understudy, pupil-teacher, tutor J. II, 100; V, 458, 473, 501.—kaṇṭaka spina dorsi, backbone M. I, 58, 80, 89; III, 92; Vism. 271; VbhA. 243; KhA 49 sq.; Sdhp. 102.—koṭṭhaka an upper room (bath room?) DhA. II, 19, 20.—gata following behind, foll. One’s example Vism. 47.—paṇṇasālā a leaf-hut at the back J. VI, 545.—parikamma treating one’s back (by rubbing) Vin. II, 106.—passe (Loc.) at the back of, behind J. I, 292; PvA. 55, 83, 106.—pāda the back of the foot, lit. foot-back, i.e. the heel Vism. 251; KhA 51, (°aṭṭhika); DA. I, 254.—pāsāṇa a flat stone or rock, plateau, ridge J. I, 278; II, 352; VI, 279; DhA. II, 58; VbhA. 5, 266.—bāha the back of the arm, i.e. elbow (cp. °pāda) KhA 49, 50 (°aṭṭhi): —maṃsa the flesh of the back PvA. 210; SnA 287.—maṃsika backbiting, one who talks behind a person’s back Sn. 244 (=°maṃsakhādaka C.); J. II, 186 (of an unfair judge); V, 1; Pv III, 97 (BB; T. °aka). As °maṃsiya at J. V, 10.—maṃsikȧtā backbiting Nd2 39.—roga back-ache SnA 111.—vaṃsa back bone, a certain beam in a building DhA. I, 52. (Page 457)

2) Piṭṭha, 2 (nt.) (identical in form with piṭṭha3) a lintel (of a door) Vin. I, 47 (kavāṭa°); II, 120 (°saṅghāṭa, cp. Vin. Texts III, 105), 148, 207. (Page 457)

3) Piṭṭha, 1 (nt.) (pp. of piṃsati2. cp. Sk. piṣṭa) what is ground, grindings, crushed seeds, flour. Vin. I, 201, 203; IV, 261, 341 (tila°=piññāka); J. II, 244 (māsa°). As piṭṭhi at J. I, 347.—khādaniya “flour-eatables, ” i.e. pastry Vin. I, 248 (cp. Vin. Texts II. 139).—dhītalikā a flour-doll, i.e. made of paste or a lump of flour PvA. 16, 19 (cp. uddāna to the 1st vagga p. 67 piṭṭhi & reading piṇḍa° on p. 17).—piṇḍi a lump of flour Vism. 500 (in comp.).—madda flour paste Vin. II, 151 (expld in C. by piṭṭha-khali; cp. piṭṭhi-madda J. III, 226, which would correspond to piṣṭī).—surā (intoxicating) extract or spirits of flour VvA. 73. (Page 457)

Pali book cover
context information

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Sanskrit-English dictionary

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Pittha (पित्थ):—and pitthaka m. Name of a man, [Rājataraṅgiṇī]

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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