Pittala: 9 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Pittala means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Rasashastra (chemistry and alchemy)

Source: Wisdom Library: Rasa-śāstra

Pittala (पित्तल, “Brass”) is the name for a variation of ‘metal’ (dhātu/loha) from the sub-group named Miśraloha, according to the Rasaprakāśasudhākara: a 13th century Sanskrit book on Indian alchemy, or, Rasaśāstra.

Brass has the following two variations:

  1. Rītikā,
  2. Kākatuṇḍī.
Source: Indian Journal of History of Science: Rasaprakāśa-sudhākara, chapter 4-5

Pittala (‘brass’) is of two types:

  1. Rītikā
  2. and Kākatuṇḍī.

That which turns on heating and quenching in tuṣajala (dhānyaāmla-an acidic liquid) is known as ṛtikā, and which turns black on heating and quenching in kāñjika is known as kākatuṇḍi.

Which looks yellowish, soft, heavy and like asāra (iron), golden yellow in colour, smooth and oily on touch is considered superior or acceptable for therapeutic uses. Which gives bad or foul smell, rough on touch, pāṇḍura (whitish) incolour, can not stand to hammering and has dry surface is considered inferior and not recommended for rasāyana purposes.

Ṛtikā is rūkṣa in guṇa, kṛmighne in karma and destroys raktapitta. Kākatuṇḍī is used in vīrya, sara in guṇa and kuṣṭhahara in karma .

Source: PMC: Therapeutic potentials of metals in ancient India

Pittala is an important Misra Loha, an alloy of Copper and Zinc, known since the period of Samhita Kala. Charaka used this metal to prepare Vasti netra. It is known as Brass. As per the descriptions available in Rasa Ratna Samuchaya, there are two varieties of Pittala viz. Ritika and Kakatundi. Formulations of ‘Pittala’ are beneficial in diseases like Krimi, Kusta, Pandu etc.

Rasashastra book cover
context information

Rasashastra (रसशास्त्र, rasaśāstra) is an important branch of Ayurveda, specialising in chemical interactions with herbs, metals and minerals. Some texts combine yogic and tantric practices with various alchemical operations. The ultimate goal of Rasashastra is not only to preserve and prolong life, but also to bestow wealth upon humankind.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

Pittala (पित्तल).—A Janapada of the Ketumālā continent.*

  • * Vāyu-purāṇa 44. 15.
Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

pittaḷa (पित्तळ).—a Commonly pittāḷū.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Pittala (पित्तल).—a. Bilious.

-lam 1 Brass.

2) A species of birch tree.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Pittala (पित्तल).—mfn.

(-laḥ-lā-laṃ) Bilious, relating to the bilious humour. n.

(-laṃ) 1. Brass. 2. The Bhurjapatra or Birch tree, of which the bark is used for writing upon, &c. f.

(-lā) A plant, (Jussieua repens.) E. pitta bile, to get, to resemble, (in colour,) aff. ḍa.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Pittala (पित्तल).—[adjective] bilious.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Pittala (पित्तल):—[from pitta] mf(ā)n. bilious, secreting bile, [Suśruta] ([gana] sidhmādi)

2) Pittalā (पित्तला):—[from pittala > pitta] f. Jussiaea Repens, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

3) Pittala (पित्तल):—[from pitta] n. brass, bell-metal, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

4) [v.s. ...] Betula Bhojpatra (its bark is used for writing upon; cf. bhūrja-pattra), [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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