Pitriyajna, aka: Pitṛyajña, Pitri-yajna; 8 Definition(s)

Introduction

Pitriyajna means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit term Pitṛyajña can be transliterated into English as Pitryajna or Pitriyajna, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Pitriyajna in Shaktism glossary... « previous · [P] · next »

Pitṛyajña (पितृयज्ञ):—One of the five Great-Sacrifices (pañchamahāyajña);—This sacrifice is intended to honor the ancestors and to enforce parental responsibilities. The fulfilment of these sacrifices (or, five debts) are presented as the duty of every human being. The five sacrifices are presided over by Chinnamastā (one of the ten mahāvidyās), who represents the power of the sacrifice (yajña).

Source: Wisdom Library: Śāktism
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Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Dharmashastra (religious law)

Pitṛyajña (पितृयज्ञ):—One of the five great sacrifices (pañcamahāyajña) to be performed by a householder, according to Manu. Pitṛyajña refers to the offerings of water and food (tarpaṇa) to the manes.

Source: Wisdom Library: Dharma-śāstra

Pitṛyajña (पितृयज्ञ) is the tarpaṇa or offering water to the older generations of our family, to our ancestors—pitṛyajñastu tarpaṇam. It is performed for the recognition of our forefathers and pleased their soul. It is also called prāśitam-prāśitaṃ pitṛtarpaṇam. After offering the bali to sarvātmabhūti, the remaining part of bali should be thrown in a southerly direction with the word svādhā for the manes. A householder should perform the śrāddha everyday to please the ancestors.

This funeral sacrifice is daily performed with food water or milk fruits or roots. After performing the śrāddha, the householder should feed even a brāhmaṇa in honour of manes.

Source: Shodhganga: Facts of society in the Manusamhita
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Dharmashastra (धर्मशास्त्र, dharmaśāstra) contains the instructions (shastra) regarding religious conduct of livelihood (dharma), ceremonies, jurisprudence (study of law) and more. It is categorized as smriti, an important and authoritative selection of books dealing with the Hindu lifestyle.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Pitriyajna in Purana glossary... « previous · [P] · next »

Pitṛyajña (पितृयज्ञ).—(Piṇḍa)—done chiefly in the dark half of the month (Indukṣaya).*

  • * Matsya-purāṇa 16. 21; 17. 4.
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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India history and geogprahy

Pitṛ-yajña.—(CII 4), offerings to the manes; one of the pañca-mahāyajña. Note: pitṛ-yajña is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Pitriyajna in Marathi glossary... « previous · [P] · next »

pitṛyajña (पितृयज्ञ).—n (S) The fourth of the five mahāyajña. Offerings of food (out of the ready meal) to the manes of deceased ancestors. See pañcayajña.

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary
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Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit-English dictionary

Pitriyajna in Sanskrit glossary... « previous · [P] · next »

Pitṛyajña (पितृयज्ञ).—

1) obsequial offerings.

2) offering libations of water every day to the deceased ancestors, it is one of the five daily Yajñas enjoined to be performed by a Brāhmaṇa; पितृयज्ञस्तु तर्पणम् (pitṛyajñastu tarpaṇam) Ms.3.1; also 122,283.

Derivable forms: pitṛyajñaḥ (पितृयज्ञः).

Pitṛyajña is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms pitṛ and yajña (यज्ञ).

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Pitṛyajña (पितृयज्ञ).—m.

(-jñaḥ) 1. Obsequial rites. 2. Oblations of water daily offered to the manes. E. pitṛ a progenitor, and yajña sacrifice.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary
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Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Relevant definitions

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