Pinyaka, Piṇyāka: 14 definitions

Introduction:

Pinyaka means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, biology. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: Wisdom Library: Āyurveda and botany

Piṇyāka (पिण्याक) is another name (synonym) for Tilakiṭṭa, a Sanskrit name referring to a drug made of the left-overs after expelling oil from the seeds of Sesamum indicum (sesame). This synonym was identified by Narahari in his 13th-century Rājanighaṇṭu (verses 16.111-116), which is an Ayurvedic medicinal thesaurus.

Source: gurumukhi.ru: Ayurveda glossary of terms

Piṇyāka (पिण्याक):—Oil cakes

Ayurveda book cover
context information

Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

Piṇyāka (पिण्याक).—The fruit of ingudi tree offered with ghee as Piṇḍa (see Rāmā. Ayo. 102. 29: 105. 35).*

  • * Vāyu-purāṇa 16. 14.
Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Biology (plants and animals)

Source: Google Books: CRC World Dictionary (Regional names)

Pinyaka in India is the name of a plant defined with Altingia excelsa in various botanical sources. This page contains potential references in Ayurveda, modern medicine, and other folk traditions or local practices It has the synonym Liquidambar altingiana Blume.

Example references for further research on medicinal uses or toxicity (see latin names for full list):

· Journal of the Arnold Arboretum (1977)
· Verhandelingen van het bataviaasch genootschap van kunsten en wetenschappen (1790)
· Species Plantarum (1753)

If you are looking for specific details regarding Pinyaka, for example chemical composition, side effects, health benefits, extract dosage, pregnancy safety, diet and recipes, have a look at these references.

Biology book cover
context information

This sections includes definitions from the five kingdoms of living things: Animals, Plants, Fungi, Protists and Monera. It will include both the official binomial nomenclature (scientific names usually in Latin) as well as regional spellings and variants.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Piṇyāka (पिण्याक).—

1) Oil-cake; कणान् वा भक्षयेदब्दं पिण्याकं वा सकृन्निशि (kaṇān vā bhakṣayedabdaṃ piṇyākaṃ vā sakṛnniśi) Manusmṛti 11.92; Bhāgavata 5.9.11.

2) Incense.

3) Saffron.

4) Asafoetida.

5) Residue of seeds ground for oil; श्रेयस्तैलं च पिण्याकात् (śreyastailaṃ ca piṇyākāt) Pañcatantra (Bombay) 3.99.

Derivable forms: piṇyākaḥ (पिण्याकः), piṇyākam (पिण्याकम्).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Piṇyāka (पिण्याक).—m.

(-kaḥ) 1. The sediments of seeds, &c. ground for oil; oilcake, or the seeds after expression. 2. Saffron. 3. Asafœtida. 4. Incense. E. piṣu to pound or bruise, deriv. irr.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Piṇyāka (पिण्याक).— (probably from piṣ, cf. puṇya), m. 1. The sediments of seed, etc., ground for oil, oil-cake, [Mānavadharmaśāstra] 11, 92. 2. Assafœtida.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Piṇyāka (पिण्याक).—[substantive] oil-cake.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Piṇyāka (पिण्याक):—[from piṇyā] mn. oil-cake, [Manu-smṛti; Āpastamba; Mahābhārata] etc.

2) [v.s. ...] Asa Foetida, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

3) [v.s. ...] incense, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

4) [v.s. ...] saffron, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

5) Piṇyākā (पिण्याका):—[from piṇyāka > piṇyā] f. a species of plant, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Piṇyāka (पिण्याक):—(kaḥ) 1. m. The sediments of seeds ground for oil, oil cake; saffron; asafoetida; incense.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Piṇyāka (पिण्याक) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit words: Pinnāga, Pinnāya.

[Sanskrit to German]

Pinyaka in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Piṇyāka (ಪಿಣ್ಯಾಕ):—

1) [noun] a mass of crushed oilseed from which the oil has been extracted, used as livestock feed and as a fertiliser; oil-cake.

2) [noun] any of various myrrhlike gum resins used as a perfumary substance or in the manufacture of perfumeries.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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