Pinda, aka: Piṇḍā, Piṇḍa; 13 Definition(s)

Introduction

Pinda means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Piṇḍā (पिण्डा):—One of the twelve guṇas associated with Piṇḍa, the seventh seat of the Svādhiṣṭhāna-chakra. According to tantric sources such as the Śrīmatottara-tantra and the Gorakṣasaṃhitā (Kādiprakaraṇa), these twelve guṇas are represented as female deities. According to the Ṣaṭsāhasrasaṃhitā however, they are explained as particular syllables. They (eg. Piṇḍā) only seem to play an minor role with regard to the interpretation of the Devīcakra (first of five chakras, as taught in the Kubjikāmata-tantra).

Source: Wisdom Library: Ṣaṭsāhasra-saṃhitā

Piṇḍa (पिण्ड) is the town associated with Vṛddhanātha, who was one of the twelve princes born to Kuṃkumā, consort to Mīnanātha, who is the incarnation of Siddhanātha in the fourth yuga, belonging to the Pūrvāmnāya (‘eastern doctrine’) tradition of Kula Śaivism, according to the Ciñcinīmatasārasamuccaya. Siddhanātha incarnates as a Kaula master in each of the four yugas. Vṛddhanātha was one of the six princes having the authority to teach.

Source: Wisdom Library: Śaivism
Shaivism book cover
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Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Piṇḍā (पिण्डा).—Rice balls given on ceremonial occasions to Pitṛs: three to be given; like the calf in search of the cow lost in the stall, mantra takes them to the Pitṛs; to be given in the name of the gotra of the person;1 can be given to cows, Brahmanas, females, crows, hen or thrown into fire or water; the middle Piṇḍa can be eaten by the wife which leads to increase of santānam;2 Piṇḍadānam on the 12th day after death is supposed to be the Pātheyam or food for the way to heaven;3 seven Piṇḍas for seven generations;4 giving of, in the tīrthas of the Narmadā;5 at Gayā with tila.6

  • 1) Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa III. 20. 10-16.
  • 2) Matsya-purāṇa 16. 21, 35, 53-54; Vāyu-purāṇa 71. 10; 75. 25, 36.
  • 3) Matsya-purāṇa 17. 46. 55.
  • 4) Ib. 18. 5 and 29.
  • 5) Ib. 186. 15. 39; 239. 34.
  • 6) Vāyu-purāṇa 105, 12, 33; 108. 15, 21; 110. 23-59.
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index
Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Dharmashastra (religious law)

Piṇḍa (पिण्ड).—When a person dies, the maximum number of days of impurity to the deceased’s relative is ten and this period is called aśauca period. Piṇḍa is offered everyday during the first ten days along with water, honey, ghee, sesame seeds, etc. Any rites to ancestors are performed only with sesame seeds. Piṇḍa is a ball of cooked rice. The preta body of dead is formed only on offering piṇḍas

The entire piṇḍa is not consumed by the preta. A piṇḍa is divided into four parts. One part is offered to the servants of Yama, the god of death. Two portions are used to convert the preta-śarīra into piṇḍa-śarīra and only the last quarter is consumed by the preta. Piṇḍas are also offered on the day of sapiṇḍīkaraṇa. On taking this piṇḍa, the preta-śarīra becomes a pitṛ and can reach the world of ancestors.

Source: Manblunder: Garuda Purana series (dharmashastra)
Dharmashastra book cover
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Dharmashastra (धर्मशास्त्र, dharmaśāstra) contains the instructions (shastra) regarding religious conduct of livelihood (dharma), ceremonies, jurisprudence (study of law) and more. It is categorized as smriti, an important and authoritative selection of books dealing with the Hindu lifestyle.

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Piṇḍa (पिण्ड, “solid mass”) represents one of the four stages of creation corresponding to the Mūlādhāra-cakra, and is explained in terms of kuṇḍalinī by Lakṣmaṇadeśika in his 11th-century Śaradātilaka verse 25.62-63.—“(62) The ‘solid mass’ (piṇḍa) is doubtlessly the kuṇḍalinī, equivalent to Śiva; the “position” (pada), on the other hand, is doubtlessly the haṃsaḥ, the inner Self of all. The “form” (rūpa) is doubtlessly the bindu of infinite lustre; the blissful union (sāmarasya) with Śiva is “form transcended” (atītarūpa). (63) Those who are good speak of the union with the piṇḍa and the others, through blissful union [with Śiva], as the [type of] union that produces a seed (sabījayoga). The dissolution into Śiva, who is endowed with the quality of  being eternal, [they call] the [type of] union that produces no seed (nirbījayoga), [that is, the type] which is indifferent to rewards”.

Note: The terms piṇḍa, pada, rūpa and rūpātīta refer to four stages of creation. These four are also said to correspond to four Cakras: piṇḍa to mūlādhāra, pada to anāhata, rūpa to ājñā and rūpātīta to sahasrāra.

Source: academia.edu: The Śāradātilakatantra on Yoga
Shaktism book cover
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Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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General definition (in Hinduism)

Piṇḍa (पिण्ड) is a Sanskrit word referring to an offering made to departed ancestors.

Source: Wisdom Library: Hinduism

In Buddhism

Theravada (major branch of Buddhism)

(Food offered to the bhikkhus).

Source: Dhamma Dana: Pali English Glossary
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Theravāda is a major branch of Buddhism having the the Pali canon (tipitaka) as their canonical literature, which includes the vinaya-pitaka (monastic rules), the sutta-pitaka (Buddhist sermons) and the abhidhamma-pitaka (philosophy and psychology).

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

Pinda in Pali glossary... « previous · [P] · next »

piṇḍa : (m.) a lump; a lump of food.

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

Piṇḍa, (cp. Vedic piṇḍa; probably connected with piṣ i.e. crush, grind, make into a lump; Grassmann compares pīḍ to press; on other attempts at etym. see Walde, Lat. Wtb. s. v. puls) 1. a lump, ball, thick (& round) mass S. I, 206 (aṭṭhīyaka°); Pv III, 55 (nonīta°); VvA. 62 (kummāsa°), 65; Sdhp. 529 (ayo°).—2. a lump of food, esp. of alms, alms given as food S. I, 76; Sn. 217, 388, 391; J. I, 7 (nibbuta° cooled); Miln. 243 (para °ṃ ajjhupagata living on food given by others). piṇḍāya (Dat.) for alms, freq. in combn with carati, paṭikkamati, (gāmaṃ) pavisati, e.g. Vin. II, 195; III, 15; M. III, 157; Sn. 386; SnA 141, 175; PvA. 12, 13, 16, 47, 81, 136 and passim.—3. a conglomeration, accumulation, compressed form, heap, in akkhara° sequence of letters or syllables, context DhA. IV, 70.—attha condensed meaning, résumé J. I, 233, 275, 306; KhA 124, 192. Cp. sampiṇḍanattha.—ukkhepakaṃ in the manner of taking up lumps (of food), a forbidden way of eating Vin. II, 214=IV. 195, cp. Vin. Texts I. 64 (=piṇḍaṃ piṇḍaṃ ukkhipitvā C.).—gaṇanā counting in a lump, summing up DA. I, 95.—cāra alms-round, wandering for alms Sn. 414.—cārika one who goes for alms, begging Vin. II, 215; III, 34, 80; IV, 79; J. I, 116; VvA. 6.—dāyika (& °dāvika) one who deals out food (as occupation of a certain class of soldiers) D. I, 51 (°dāvika); A. IV, 107 (v. l. °dāyaka); Miln. 331; cp. DA. I, 156. See also Geiger, P. Gr. 46, 1; Rh. D. Dial. I. 68 (trsl. “camp-follower”); Franke, Dīgha trsl. 531 trsl. “Vorkämpfer” but recommends trsl. “Klossverteiler” as well).—dhītalikā a doll made of a lump of dough, or of pastry PvA. 17; cp. piṭṭha°.—paṭipiṇḍa (kamma) giving lump after lump, alms for alms, i.e. reciprocatory begging J. II, 82 (piṇḍa-paṭipiṇḍena jīvikaṃ kappesuṃ), 307 (piṇḍapāta-paṭipiṇḍena jīvikaṃ kappenti); V, 390 (mayaṃ piṇḍa-paṭipiṇḍa-kammaṃ na karoma).—pāta food received in the alms-bowl (of the bhikkhu), alms-gathering (on term see Vism. 31 yo hi koci āhāro bhikkhuno piṇḍolyena patte patitattā piṇḍapāto ti vuccati, and cp. BSk. piṇḍapāta-praviṣṭha AvŚ I. 359; piṇḍapāta-nirhāraka Divy 239) Vin. I, 46; II, 32 (°ṃ nīharāpeti), 77, 198, 223; III, 80, 99; IV, 66 sq. , 77; M. III, 297; S. I, 76, 92; A. I, 240; II, 27, 143; III, 109, 145 sq.; V, 100; Sn. 339; J. I, 7, 149, 212, 233; Pug. 59; Vism. 31, 60; VbhA. 279 (°âpacāyana); SnA 374; PvA. 11 sq. , 16, 38, 240.—pātika one who eats only food received in the alms-bowl; °aṅga is one of the dhutaṅga ordinances (see dhutaṅga) Vin. I, 253; II, 32 (°aṅga), 299 (+paṃsukūlika); III, 15 (id.); M. I, 30; III, 41; A. III, 391; Pug. 59, 69; SnA 57 (°dhutaṅga).—piṇḍapātika bhikkhu a bh. on his alms-round Vism. 246 (in simile); VbhA. 229 (id.). Cp. BSk. piṇḍapātika AvŚ I. 248.—pātikatta (abstr. to prec.) the state of eating alms-food, a characteristic of the Buddhist bhikkhu M. III, 41; S. II, 202, 208 sq.; A. I, 38; III, 109. (Page 458)

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary
Pali book cover
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Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

piṇḍa (पिंड).—m (S) A lump, heap, cluster, a quantity or collection. 2 An oblation to deceased ancestors,--a ball or lump (of rice &c. mixed up with milk, curds, flowers) offered to the manes, at a Shraddh, by the nearest surviving relation. 3 The body. 4 A ball or globe, any globose body, a gland &c. 5 In geometry. The dimension of thickness. 6 The fœtus in an early stage of gestation, the embryo. 7 A sum in arithmetic.

--- OR ---

piṇḍā (पिंडा).—m (piṇḍa) A ball of thread.

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

piṇḍa (पिंड).—m A lump. An oblation to deceased ancestors. The body. The embryo. piṇḍāsa basaṇēṃ-lāgaṇēṃ-khiḷaṇēṃ-jaḍaṇēṃ To stick closely to; to follow to the death. piṇḍī tē bramhāṇḍī Whatever is in the body is in the universe at large; man is a microcosm.

--- OR ---

piṇḍā (पिंडा).—m A ball of thread.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English
context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit-English dictionary

Piṇḍa (पिण्ड).—a. (-ṇḍī f.) [पिण्ड्-अच् (piṇḍ-ac)]

1) Solid (ghana).

2) Compact, dense, close.

-ṇḍaḥ, -ṇḍam 1 A round mass, ball, globe; as in अयःपिण्डः, नेत्रपिण्डः (ayaḥpiṇḍaḥ, netrapiṇḍaḥ) &c.

2) A lump, clod (of earth &c.).

3) A round lump of food, morsel, mouthful; स न्यस्तशस्त्रो हरये स्वदेहमुपानयत् पिण्डमिवामिषस्य (sa nyastaśastro haraye svadehamupānayat piṇḍamivāmiṣasya) R. 2.59.

4) A ball or lump of rice offered to the Manes at obsequial ceremonies or Śrāddhas; नूनं मत्तः परं वंश्याः पिण्डविच्छेददर्शिनः । न प्रकामभुजः श्राद्धे स्वधासंग्रहतत्पराः (nūnaṃ mattaḥ paraṃ vaṃśyāḥ piṇḍavicchedadarśinaḥ | na prakāmabhujaḥ śrāddhe svadhāsaṃgrahatatparāḥ) | R.1.66; 8.26; Ms.3.216;9.132,136,14; Y.1.159.

5) Food in general; सफलीकृतभर्तृपिण्डः (saphalīkṛtabhartṛpiṇḍaḥ) M.5. 'who was true to his master's salt'.

6) Livelihood, sustenance, subsistence; पिण्डार्थमायस्यतः (piṇḍārthamāyasyataḥ) Mu.3.14.

7) Alms; पिण्डपातवेला (piṇḍapātavelā) Māl.2.

8) Flesh, meat.

9) The fœtus or embryo in an early stage of gestation.

1) The body, corporeal frame; एकान्तविध्वंसिषु मद्विधानां पिण्डेष्वनास्था खलु भौतिकेषु (ekāntavidhvaṃsiṣu madvidhānāṃ piṇḍeṣvanāsthā khalu bhautikeṣu) R.2.57.

11) A heap, collection, multitude.

12) The calf of the leg; Māl.5.16.

13) A round button.

14) Anything round, thick, gross or solid.

15) An object in general.

16) A particular part of a house.

17) (In astr.) A sine expressed in numbers.

18) The twenty-fourth part of the quadrant of a circle.

19) The frontal sinus of an elephant or its projection.

2) A portico or shed in front of the door.

21) Incense, frank-incense.

22) (In arith.) Sum, total, amount.

23) (In geom.) Thickness.

24) The flower of a China rose.

-ṇḍam 1 Power, strength, might.

2) Iron.

3) Fresh butter.

4) An army.

5) Water; L. D. B.

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Piṇḍa (पिण्ड).—mn.

(-ṇḍaḥ-ṇḍaṃ) A lump, a heap, a cluster, a quantity or collection. mf. (-ṇḍaḥ-ṇḍī) An oblation to deceased ancestors as a ball or lump of meat, or rice, mixed up with milk, curds, flowers, &c. and offered to the manes at the several Shradd'has. by the nearest surviving relations. m.

(-ṇḍaḥ) 1. A ball, a globe. 2. A mouthful, or roundish lump of food, considered as equivalent to a mouthful. 3. Presenting water or cake to a deceased relation. 4. The body. 5. The side immediately below the armpit. 6. A part of a house; a sort of portico or shed, in front of the door. 7. Coarse, gross, thick, solid. 8. Strength, power. 9. Myrrh. 10. Franki- ncense. 11. The China rose. 12. Food. 13. Flesh, meat. 14. The projection of an elephant’s frontal sinus. 15. The embryo or fetus in an early stage of gestation. 16. A sum, (in arithmetic.) 17. Thickness, (In geometry.) 18. (In astronomy,) The twenty-fourth part of the quadrant of a circle, or 30-45’. n.

(-ṇḍaṃ) 1. Livelihood, means, means of living. 2. Iron. 3. Fresh butter. 4. Power, strength. 5. An army. f. (-ṇḍī) 1. A long gourd, (Cucurbita lagenaria.) 2. A sort of palm, (Phœnix dactylifera.) 3. A flowering shrub, (Tabernæmontana coronaria flor. plen.) 4. Performance of certain gesticulations, accompanying the silent repetition of prayers, &c. in meditation on real or divine knowledge. 5. The nave of a wheel. 6. A house. 7. Solid, compact, close. 8. The calf of the leg. 9. A round mass. E. piḍi to heap, to gather, to collect, &c. aff. ac fem. aff. ṅīp .

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary
context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Relevant definitions

Search found 178 related definition(s) that might help you understand this better. Below you will find the 15 most relevant articles:

Pindapata
Piṇḍapāta (पिण्डपात).—m. (-taḥ) Collecting or giving alms.
Rajapinda
Rājapiṇḍa (राजपिण्ड).—the maintenance given by a king; अवश्यं राजपिण्डस्तैर्निवेश्य इति मे मतिः...
Pindapatika
Piṇḍapātika (पिण्डपातिक).—one who lives on alms. Derivable forms: piṇḍapātikaḥ (पिण्डपातिकः).Pi...
Pindoddharana
Piṇḍoddharaṇa (पिण्डोद्धरण).—n. (-ṇaṃ) Participating in obsequial offerings, presenting them to...
Pindamula
Piṇḍamūla (पिण्डमूल).—n. (-laṃ) The carrot, (Daucus carota.) E. piṇḍa lump of flesh, and mūla a...
Tarkupinda
Tarkupiṇḍa (तर्कुपिण्ड).—m. (-ṇḍaḥ) A ball of clay, &c. upon the lower end of the spindle t...
Pindadana
Piṇḍadāna (पिण्डदान).—1) presentation of the obsequial rice-balls. 2) the funeral oblation made...
Pindagosa
Piṇḍagosa (पिण्डगोस).—m. (-saḥ) Gum myrrh; also piṇḍa, and gosa severally. “gandharase” .
Pindayasa
Piṇḍāyasa (पिण्डायस).—n. (-saṃ) Steel. E. piṇḍa, and ayasa iron.
Pindasana
Piṇḍāśana (पिण्डाशन).—m. a beggar. Derivable forms: piṇḍāśanaḥ (पिण्डाशनः).Piṇḍāśana is a Sansk...
Hritpinda
Hṛtpiṇḍa (हृत्पिण्ड).—n. (-ṇḍaṃ) The heart. E. hṛt, and piṇḍa lump of flesh.
Pindapada
Piṇḍapada (पिण्डपद).—a particular अङ्कभेद (aṅkabheda) in Astronomy; Śabda Chi. Derivable forms:...
Raktapinda
Raktapiṇḍa (रक्तपिण्ड).—m. (-ṇḍaḥ) 1. The China-rose, (Hibiscus, rosa sinensis.) “javāphul”. 2....
Netrapinda
Netrapiṇḍa (नेत्रपिण्ड).—mf. (-ṇḍaḥ-ṇḍī) 1. A cat. 2. The ball of the eye. E. netra the eye, an...
Pindanvaharyaka
Piṇḍānvāhāryaka (पिण्डान्वाहार्यक).—a meal in honour of the manes. Derivable forms: piṇḍānvāhār...

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