Pida, Piḍā: 17 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Pida means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India, Marathi, Jainism, Prakrit, Hindi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: gurumukhi.ru: Ayurveda glossary of terms

Pīḍā (पीडा):—Pain

Ayurveda book cover
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Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Jyotisha (astronomy and astrology)

Source: Wisdom Library: Brihat Samhita by Varahamihira

Pīḍā (पीडा) refers to “impurities (of planets)” [?], according to the Bṛhatsaṃhitā (chapter 3), an encyclopedic Sanskrit work written by Varāhamihira mainly focusing on the science of ancient Indian astronomy astronomy (Jyotiṣa).—Accordingly, “If at rising and setting the sun should be hid by clouds of the shape of implements of war, he will bring on strife; if these clouds should appear like a deer, a buffalo, a bird, an ass or a young camel, mankind will be afflicted with fears. The planets, when subjected to the hot rays of the sun are freed from their impurities [i.e., pīḍā] just as gold is purified by the action of the fire”.

Jyotisha book cover
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Jyotisha (ज्योतिष, jyotiṣa or jyotish) refers to ‘astronomy’ or “Vedic astrology” and represents the fifth of the six Vedangas (additional sciences to be studied along with the Vedas). Jyotisha concerns itself with the study and prediction of the movements of celestial bodies, in order to calculate the auspicious time for rituals and ceremonies.

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India history and geography

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary

Piḍā.—(Chamba), a grain measure; also spelt piṭha, peḍā, pyoḍā. Note: piḍā is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

piḍā (पिडा).—f (Properly pīḍā S q. v.) Pain, affliction &c.

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piḍā (पिडा).—m W piḍhā m R The stock or lower portion of a branch of the Cocoanut.

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pīḍā (पीडा).—f (S) Pain, anguish, torment: also trouble, vexation, affliction, distress. 2 A pest, plague, bore; a troublesome person, business, event, thing. 3 By eminence. Demoniac possession,

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

piḍā (पिडा).—f Pain, affliction.

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pīḍā (पीडा).—f Pain, torment; trouble, distress. A pest, plague. A troublesome person or business. Demoniac possession.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Pīḍā (पीडा).—[pīḍ bhāve bhidā° aṅ] Pain, trouble, suffering, annoyance, molestation, agony; आश्रमपीडा (āśramapīḍā) R.1.37 'disturbance', 71; मदन°, दारिद्र्य° (madana°, dāridrya°) &c.

2) Injury, damage, harm; मूढग्राहेणात्मनो यत् पीडया क्रियते तपः (mūḍhagrāheṇātmano yat pīḍayā kriyate tapaḥ) Bg.17. 19; Ms.7.169.

3) Devastation, laying waste.

4) Violation, infringement.

5) Restriction.

6) Pity, compassion.

7) Eclipse.

8) A chaplet, garland for the head.

9) The Sarala tree.

1) A basket.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Pīḍā (पीडा).—f.

(-ḍā) 1. Pain, anguish, suffering. 2. Compassion, charity, pity. 3. Devastation, laying waste. 4. A chaplet, a garland for the head. 5. The Saral tree, (Pinus longifolia.) 6. Infraction, violation. 7. Damage, injury. E. pīḍ to pain, aṅ and ṭāp affs.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Pīḍā (पीडा).—[pīḍ + ā], f. 1. Pain, anguish, suffering, Böhtl. Ind. Spr. 753. 2. Infraction, [Daśakumāracarita] in Chr. 182, 14.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Pīḍā (पीडा).—[feminine] pain, ache, harm, wrong.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Pīḍa (पीड):—[from pīḍ] m. n. in tila-p, triṇa-p.

2) Pīḍā (पीडा):—[from pīḍ] f. pain, suffering, annoyance, harm, injury, violation, damage (ḍayā ind. with pain id est. unwillingly), [Manu-smṛti; Mahābhārata] etc.

3) [v.s. ...] devastation (cf. pīḍana), [Horace H. Wilson]

4) [v.s. ...] restriction, limitation, [Kātyāyana-śrauta-sūtra [Scholiast or Commentator]]

5) [v.s. ...] obscuration, eclipse (of a planet cf. graha-p), [Varāha-mihira]

6) [v.s. ...] pity, compassion, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

7) [v.s. ...] a chaplet or garland for the head, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.] (cf. āpīḍa)

8) [v.s. ...] Pinus Longifolia, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

9) [v.s. ...] a basket, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

10) [v.s. ...] [wrong reading] for pīṭha.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Pīḍā (पीडा):—(ḍā) 1. f. Pain; pity; devastation; chaplet; Pinus longifolia.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Pīḍa (पीड) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit words: Piṭṭa, Piḍḍa, Pīḍa, Pīḍā, Pīla, Pella.

[Sanskrit to German]

Pida in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Hindi dictionary

Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

Pīḍā (पीडा):—(nf) pain, ache, aching; anguish; agony, suffering; ~[kara] painsgiving, tormenting, troublesome; causing agony/anguish; ~[nāśaka/hara] pain-relieving, paregoric.

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Prakrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary

1) Piḍa (पिड) in the Prakrit language is related to the Sanskrit word: Piṭa.

2) Pīḍa (पीड) also relates to the Sanskrit word: Pīḍa.

3) Pīḍā (पीडा) also relates to the Sanskrit word: Pīḍā.

context information

Prakrit is an ancient language closely associated with both Pali and Sanskrit. Jain literature is often composed in this language or sub-dialects, such as the Agamas and their commentaries which are written in Ardhamagadhi and Maharashtri Prakrit. The earliest extant texts can be dated to as early as the 4th century BCE although core portions might be older.

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