Picchila, Picchilā: 17 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Picchila means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Buddhism, Pali, Jainism, Prakrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

Alternative spellings of this word include Pichchhila.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous next»] — Picchila in Purana glossary
Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopedia

Picchilā (पिच्छिला).—A river of Purāṇic fame which runs through Uttara Bhārata. (Śloka 29, Chapter 9, Bhīṣma Parva).

Source: JatLand: List of Mahabharata people and places

Picchila (पिच्छिल) is a name mentioned in the Mahābhārata (cf. I.52.5, I.57) and represents one of the many proper names used for people and places. Note: The Mahābhārata (mentioning Picchila) is a Sanskrit epic poem consisting of 100,000 ślokas (metrical verses) and is over 2000 years old.

Picchilā also refers to the name of a River mentioned in the Mahābhārata (cf. VI.10.28).

Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: gurumukhi.ru: Ayurveda glossary of terms

1) Picchila (पिच्छिल):—Slimy touch, gummy, Sticky, Slyminess,

2) [picchilaḥ] The property of the substance which causes Slimness and stickyness

Source: WorldCat: Rāj nighaṇṭu

Picchilā (पिच्छिला) is another name for Kokilākṣa, a medicinal plant identified with Astercantha longifolia Nees., a synonym of synonym of Hygrophila auriculata (Schumach.) Heine from the Acanthaceae or “acanthus” family of flowering plants, according to verse 4.191-193 of the 13th-century Raj Nighantu or Rājanighaṇṭu. The fourth chapter (śatāhvādi-varga) of this book enumerates eighty varieties of small plants (pṛthu-kṣupa). Together with the names Picchilā and Kokilākṣa, there are a total of fourteen Sanskrit synonyms identified for this plant.

Source: National Mission for Manuscripts: Traditional Medicine System in India

Picchila (पिच्छिल, “cloudy”) and Viśada (“clear”) refers to one of the ten counterpart-couples of the twenty Śārīraguṇa (or Gurvādiguṇa), which refers to the “twenty qualities of the body”—where guṇa (property) represents one of the six divisions of dravya (drugs).—Śārīraka-guṇas are twenty in number. There are ten guṇas with their opposite guṇas. [...] Sūkṣma (“clear”) has the predominant bhūta (element) of fire, air, ether (space) and the associated actions of “cleansing/kṣālana”; while Picchila (“cloudy”) has the predominant bhūta (element) of earth, water and is associated with the action “adhering/lepana”.

Ayurveda book cover
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Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

[«previous next»] — Picchila in Pali glossary
Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

picchila : (adj.) slippery.

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Picchila, (adj.) (cp. Class. Sk. picchila) slippery Vism. 264; VbhA. 247 (lasikā=p-kuṇapaṃ); DhA. III, 4 (°magga). (Page 457)

Pali book cover
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Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Picchila (पिच्छिल).—a. [picch bā° ila]

1) Slimy, lubricous, slippery, smeary; Mb.12.184.34; तरुणं सर्षपशाकं नवौदनं पिच्छिलानि च दधीनि (taruṇaṃ sarṣapaśākaṃ navaudanaṃ picchilāni ca dadhīni) Chand. M.1.

2) Having a tail.

-laḥ, -lā, -lam 1 The scum of boiled rice (bhaktamaṇḍa).

2) Sauce mixed with rice-gruel.

3) Curds with cream on the surface.

4) Broth, soup.

5) Moist split pulse.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Picchila (पिच्छिल).—mfn. subst.

(-laḥ-lā-laṃ) 1. Sauce mixed with rice gruel. 2. Sauce, gravy, or condiments with water or Ghee. 3. Broth, soup. 4. Moist, and split pulse. f.

(-lā) 1. The silk cotton tree, (Bombax heptaphyllum.) 2. A potherb, (Basella rubra and lucida.) 5. A timber tree, (Dalbergia Sisu.) 4. The name of a river. 5. An esculent root, (Arum Indicum.) 6. Lubricous, slippery, smeary. m.

(-laḥ) The tamarisk, (Tamarix Indica.) mfn. adj.

(-laḥ-lā-laṃ) Having a tail. E. picchā rice water, scum, &c. and ilac aff.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Picchila (पिच्छिल).—I. adj., f. , Slimy, lubricous, Mārk. P. 10, 9. Ii. f. , The name of several plants.

— Cf. [Latin] pix.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Picchila (पिच्छिल).—[adjective] slimy, slippery.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Picchila (पिच्छिल):—[from pich] mf(ā)n. slimy, lubricous, slippery, smeary (opp. to viśada), [Mahābhārata; Suśruta] (-tva n.), etc.

2) [v.s. ...] having a tail, [Horace H. Wilson]

3) [v.s. ...] m. Cordia Latifolia, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

4) [v.s. ...] Tamarix Indica, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

5) Picchilā (पिच्छिला):—[from picchila > pich] f. Name of a river, [Mahābhārata] ([varia lectio] picchalā)

6) [v.s. ...] of sub voce trees and other plants (Dalbergia Sissoo, Bombax Heptaphyllum, Basella Lucida or Rubra, a kind of grass etc.), [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Picchila (पिच्छिल):—[(laḥ-lā-laṃ)] 1. m. f. n. Sauce mixed with the rice gruel; sauce; broth; moist split pulse. m. Tamarisk tree. f. () Silk cotton tree, a potherb; a Sisu tree; esculent root; name of a river. a. Having a tail; slippery.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Picchila (पिच्छिल) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit word: Picchila.

[Sanskrit to German]

Picchila in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Prakrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary

Picchila (पिच्छिल) in the Prakrit language is related to the Sanskrit word: Picchila.

context information

Prakrit is an ancient language closely associated with both Pali and Sanskrit. Jain literature is often composed in this language or sub-dialects, such as the Agamas and their commentaries which are written in Ardhamagadhi and Maharashtri Prakrit. The earliest extant texts can be dated to as early as the 4th century BCE although core portions might be older.

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