Piccha: 13 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Piccha means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Buddhism, Pali, the history of ancient India, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

Alternative spellings of this word include Pichchha.

India history and geogprahy

Source: Project Gutenberg: Castes and Tribes of Southern India, Volume 1

1) Piccha refers to one of the septs (khilai) among the Sembanattus (Sembanadus): an important sub-divisions of the Maravans (one of the first of the Dravidian tribes that penetrated to the south of the peninsula). The Maravan people claim descent from Guha or Kuha, Rāma’s boatman, who rowed him across to Ceylon.

2) Piccha (mendicancy symbolic of family priests) refers to a type of “privilege” applied to certain divisions of the Nambutiris. Piccha refers to the right of officiating as family priests. The Nambutiri people form the socio-spiritual aristocracy of Malabar, and, as the traditional landlords of Parasu Rama’s land, they are everywhere held in great reverence.

India history book cover
context information

The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

piccha : (nt.) 1. tail-feather; 2. (any kind of) gum.

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Piccha, (nt.) (cp. Epic Sk. piccha & puccha tail, to Lat. pinna, E. fin. Ger. finne) tail-feather, esp. of the peacock Vin. I, 186 (mora°).—dve° (& de°) having two tail-feathers J. V, 339, 341 (perhaps to be taken as “wing” here, cp. Halāyudha 2, 84=pakṣa). Cp. piñcha & piñja. (Page 457)

Pali book cover
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Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

piccha (पिच्छ).—n (S) A feather. 2 The tail of a peacock. 3 A crest. 4 m S A tail.

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picchā (पिच्छा).—m (piccha S through H) The hinder parts. 2 The back-piece (of an Angrakha &c.) Used gen. in figurative senses, such as these following. picchā ghēṇēṃ-puraviṇēṃ-dharaṇēṃ, picchayāsa basaṇēṃ or lāgaṇēṃ, picchayāvara asaṇēṃ To pursue with closeness and determination, lit. fig.; to hang upon; to be closely dodging, intently following or watching (in order to injure, befriend &c.) picchā karaṇēṃ To recoil or kick--a gun.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

piccha (पिच्छ).—n A feather. A crest. A tail.

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picchā (पिच्छा) [-ḍā, -डा].—m The hinder parts. The back piece. picchā ghēṇēṃ-puraviṇēṃ-dharaṇēṃ, picchayāsa basaṇēṃ or lāgaṇēṃ, picchayāvara asaṇēṃ To pursue with closeness and determination. picchā karaṇēṃ To recoil or kick-a gun.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Piccha (पिच्छ).—[picch-ac]

1) A feather of a tail (as of a peacock); Bhāg.1.12.4.

2) The tail of a peacock; शिखिपिच्छलाञ्छितकपोलभित्ती (śikhipicchalāñchitakapolabhittī) Ki.12.41; क्षणमलघुविलम्बिपिच्छ- दाम्नः शिखरशिखाः शिखिशेखरानमुष्य (kṣaṇamalaghuvilambipiccha- dāmnaḥ śikharaśikhāḥ śikhiśekharānamuṣya) Śi.4.5.

3) The feathers of an arrow.

4) A wing.

5) A crest.

-cchaḥ A tail in general.

-cchā 1 A sheath, covering, coat.

2) The scum of boiled rice.

3) A row, line.

4) A heap, multitude.

5) The gum or exudation of the silk-cotton tree.

6) A plantain.

7) An armour.

8) The calf of the leg.

9) The venomous saliva of a snake.

1) A betel-nut.

11) A diseased affection of a horse's feet.

Derivable forms: piccham (पिच्छम्).

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Piccha (पिच्छ).—q. v.

See also (synonyms): piñccha.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Piccha (पिच्छ).—n.

(-cchaṃ) 1. The tail of a peacock. 2. A crest. 3. The feather of a tail. 4. The feather of an arrow. m.

(-cchaḥ) A tail in general. f.

(-cchā) 1. The gum of the silk cotton tree. 2. A line, a row or range. 3. A diseased affection of a horse’s feet. 4. The nut of the Areca, betel-nut. 5. A plantain. 6. The scum of boiled rice. 7. A sort of body dress, or jacket. 8. The venomous saliva of a snake. 9. The Sisu tree, (Dalbergia Sisu.) 10. A sheath, a coat or cover. 11. An armour. 12. A multitude, a heap. 13. The calf of the leg. 14. The Indian cuckoo. 15. The exudation of the Salmali tree. E. picch to divide, aff. ghañ or ac .

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Piccha (पिच्छ).—I. m. A tail. Ii. n. 1. A feather of the tail, [Pañcatantra] 175, 9; especially of a peacock. 2. A crest.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Piccha (पिच्छ).—[neuter] feather of a tail ([especially] of the peacock); [plural] the feathers of an arrow. [feminine] ā the scum of boiled rice etc.; lump, mass, heap, multitude.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Piccha (पिच्छ):—[from pich] n. a feather of a tail ([especially] of a peacock, [probably] from its being spread or expanded), [Mahābhārata; Kāvya literature] etc.

2) [v.s. ...] ([plural]) the feathers of an arrow, [Kātyāyana-śrauta-sūtra [Scholiast or Commentator]]

3) [v.s. ...] a tail (also m.), [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

4) [v.s. ...] a wing, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

5) [v.s. ...] a crest, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

6) Picchā (पिच्छा):—[from piccha > pich] f. the scum of boiled rice and of other grain, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

7) [v.s. ...] the gum of Bombax Heptaphyllum, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

8) [v.s. ...] slimy saliva, [Caraka]

9) [v.s. ...] the venomous saliva of a snake, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

10) [v.s. ...] a multitude, mass, heap, [Caraka]

11) [v.s. ...] the calf of the leg, [Varāha-mihira]

12) [v.s. ...] a sheath or cover, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

13) [v.s. ...] the areca-nut, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

14) [v.s. ...] a row or line, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

15) [v.s. ...] a diseased affection of a horse’s feet, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

16) [v.s. ...] Dalbergia Sissoo, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

17) [v.s. ...] = mocā and picchila, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

18) [v.s. ...] armour, a sort of cuirass, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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