Phalamula, Phalamūla, Phala-mula: 6 definitions

Introduction:

Phalamula means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Jyotisha (astronomy and astrology)

[«previous next»] — Phalamula in Jyotisha glossary
Source: Wisdom Library: Brihat Samhita by Varahamihira

Phalamūla (फलमूल) refers to “roots and fruits”, according to the Bṛhatsaṃhitā (chapter 5), an encyclopedic Sanskrit work written by Varāhamihira mainly focusing on the science of ancient Indian astronomy astronomy (Jyotiṣa).—Accordingly, “If there should be both lunar and solar eclipses in one month, princes will suffer both from dissensions among their own army and from wars. [...] If the eclipses should fall in the lunar month of Āṣāḍha, wells, wet fields and rivers will become dry; dealers in roots and fruits [i.e., phalamūla-vārtta], the people of Gāndhāra, of Kāśmīra, of Pulinda and of Cīna (China) will perish; and there will be abundance of rain”.

Jyotisha book cover
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Jyotisha (ज्योतिष, jyotiṣa or jyotish) refers to ‘astronomy’ or “Vedic astrology” and represents the fifth of the six Vedangas (additional sciences to be studied along with the Vedas). Jyotisha concerns itself with the study and prediction of the movements of celestial bodies, in order to calculate the auspicious time for rituals and ceremonies.

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

[«previous next»] — Phalamula in Shaktism glossary
Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

Phalamūla (फलमूल) refers to “fruits and roots”, according to the Ṣaṭsāhasrasaṃhitā, an expansion of the Kubjikāmatatantra: the earliest popular and most authoritative Tantra of the Kubjikā cult.— Accordingly, “[...] According to the Kula teaching (these) are the most excellent Kula trees that give accomplishments and liberation. (They are full of) Yoginīs, Siddhas, Lords of the Heroes and hosts of gods and demons. One should not touch them with one’s feet or urinate and defecate on them or have sex etc. below them. One should not cut etc. or burn them. Having worshipped and praised them regularly with their own flowers and shoots, one should always worship the Śrīkrama with devotion with their best fruits and roots [i.e., phalamūla-vara]. [...]”.

Shaktism book cover
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Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous next»] — Phalamula in Purana glossary
Source: Wisdom Library: Padma-purana

Phalamūla (फलमूल) refers to “fruits and roots” and is used in the worship of Gaṇeśa, according to the Padmapurāṇa 1.65 (“The Slaying of Kālakeya”).—Accordingly, as Vyāsa said:—“[...] The king is not angry with him; plague does not occur in his house; he does not feel the dearth (of anything); he does not suffer from weakness after (i.e. due to his) having worshipped Gaṇeśa. ‘(My) salutation to the chief of the Gaṇas, who removes all difficulties, who was worshipped even by gods for accomplishing their desired objects’. The sacred formula is: ‘Om, salutation to Gaṇapati’. He, who would worship the protector of the Gaṇas, with flowers dear to Viṣṇu, and other fragrant flowers, with modakas, fruits, roots [i.e., phalamūla] and other seasonal things, with curds and milk, pleasing musical instruments, and with incense and (other) fragrant (objects) obtains success in all undertakings. [...]”.

Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

[«previous next»] — Phalamula in Shaivism glossary
Source: SOAS University of London: Protective Rites in the Netra Tantra

Phalamūla (फलमूल) refers to “fruit and roots”, according to the Netratantra of Kṣemarāja: a Śaiva text from the 9th century in which Śiva (Bhairava) teaches Pārvatī topics such as metaphysics, cosmology, and soteriology.—Accordingly, [verse 19.106cd-109]—“The [Mantrin] is to perform the lustration in order to secure prosperity of the king and in the kingdom when the king is touched by the power of death, when [the king], his sons, or his country are marked by signs of death, etc., when Brahmins [and others] are [in danger] in all directions [i.e., in the capital and elsewhere], with the danger of loss of rice crops, grain, fruit, roots (phalamūla) and water, and in times of famine, disease and great calamities. After sacrificing as before, the [Mantrin] should perform the water pot consecration”.

Shaivism book cover
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Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

[«previous next»] — Phalamula in Sanskrit glossary
Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Phalamūla (फलमूल).—fruits and roots; फलमूलाशिनौ दान्तौ (phalamūlāśinau dāntau) Rāmarakṣā 18.

Derivable forms: phalamūlam (फलमूलम्).

Phalamūla is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms phala and mūla (मूल).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Phalamūla (फलमूल):—[=phala-mūla] [from phala > phal] n. sg. or [dual number] or [plural] fruits and roots, [Manu-smṛti; Mahābhārata; Rāmāyaṇa; Kathāsaritsāgara]

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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