Payasa, Pāyasa, Pāyāsa: 12 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Payasa means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Natyashastra (theatrics and dramaturgy)

Source: Wisdom Library: Nāṭya-śāstra

Pāyasa (पायस) is a Sanskrit word referring to rice cooked in milk with sugar. During the ceremony of “laying the foundation” of the playhouse (nāṭyamaṇḍapa), this pāyasa should be offered to Brahmins, according to the Nāṭyaśāstra 2.41-42.

Natyashastra book cover
context information

Natyashastra (नाट्यशास्त्र, nāṭyaśāstra) refers to both the ancient Indian tradition (śāstra) of performing arts, (nāṭya, e.g., theatrics, drama, dance, music), as well as the name of a Sanskrit work dealing with these subjects. It also teaches the rules for composing dramatic plays (nataka) and poetic works (kavya).

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Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: Shodhganga: Dietetics and culinary art in ancient and medieval India

Pāyasa (पायस) refers to one of the various types of “gruels” (usually refers to a food preparation with cereal boiled in water or milk), as mentioned in the Kṛtānnavarga, which is a subsection of the Annapānavidhi of the Sūtrasthāna of the Suśrutasaṃhitā, an important Ayurvedic treatise. The discourses of the teacher Divodasa are believed to be summarised by his disciple Suśruta, who wrote the work Suśrutasaṃhitā in 4th century CE. [...] Kṛtānna-varga, the subsection of Annapānavidhi describes the preparations and properties of different types of gruels like peya, vilepi, maṇḍa, pāyasa, mudgayūṣa and kṛsara, meat dishes like ullupta, vesavāra, etc.

Pāyasa (a mixture of cooked rice, jaggery and milk) is mentioned in a list of forbidden combinations (saṃyogaviruddha) according to the 17th century Bhojanakutūhala in the dravyaguṇāguṇa-kathana, which contains the discussions on different food articles and their dietetic effects according to the prominent Ayurvedic treatises.—It is unhealthy to consume a mixture of pāyasa (a mixture of cooked rice, jaggery and milk), liquor and kṛsara (a mixture of cooked rice, salt, wet ginger, asafoetida and split red lentil).

Pāyasa is also mentioned in a list of potential causes for indigestion.—A complete section in Bhojanakutūhala is devoted for the description of agents that cause indigestion [viz., pāyasa (a mixture of cooked rice, jaggery and milk)]. These agents consumed on a large scale can cause indigestion for certain people. The remedies [viz., yūṣa prepared from green-gram] for these types of indigestions are also explained therewith.

Ayurveda book cover
context information

Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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In Buddhism

Mahayana (major branch of Buddhism)

Source: Wisdom Library: Maha Prajnaparamita Sastra

Pāyasa (पायस) refers to “milk-soup” according to the according to the 2nd century Mahāprajñāpāramitāśāstra (chapter VI). The messenger came back to tell the king (Śuddhodana): “The Bodhisattva is nothing but skin, bones and sinews to hold it all together. He is very weak. Today or tomorrow will be the end of him”. But the bodhisattva, renouncing asceticism, partook of the milk soup (pāyasa) of a hundred flavors, and his body recovered its strength.

According to the 2nd century Mahāprajñāpāramitāśāstra (chapter VII), “At midnight, he left his home (abhiniṣkramaṇa) and practiced asceticism (duṣkaracarya) for six years. Then he ate some sweetened milk-broth (pāyasa) of sixteen restorative qualities offered to him by the Brāhmanī Nant’o (Nandā) and, under the tree of enlightenment (bodhivṛkṣa), he defied Māra’s army of 18,000 koṭis of warriors and attained supreme perfect enlightenment (anuttara-samyaksaṃbodhi)”.

Mahayana book cover
context information

Mahayana (महायान, mahāyāna) is a major branch of Buddhism focusing on the path of a Bodhisattva (spiritual aspirants/ enlightened beings). Extant literature is vast and primarely composed in the Sanskrit language. There are many sūtras of which some of the earliest are the various Prajñāpāramitā sūtras.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Pāyāsa, (cp. Class. Sk. pāyāsa) rice boiled in milk, milk-rice, rice porridge S. I, 166; Sn. p. 15; J. I, 50, 68; IV, 391; V, 211; Vism. 41; SnA 151; DhA. I, 171; II, 88; VvA. 32. (Page 454)

— or —

Pāyāsa, (cp. Class. Sk. pāyāsa) rice boiled in milk, milk-rice, rice porridge S. I, 166; Sn. p. 15; J. I, 50, 68; IV, 391; V, 211; Vism. 41; SnA 151; DhA. I, 171; II, 88; VvA. 32. (Page 454)

Pali book cover
context information

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

pāyasa (पायस).—n S A dish made of rice, milk, and sugar.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Payasa (पयस).—n.

(-saṃ) 1. Water. 2. Milk. E. payas the same, ac added.

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Pāyasa (पायस).—mfn.

(-saḥ-sī-saṃ) Made of or from milk or water. mn.

(-saḥ-saṃ) 1. An oblation of milk, rice, and sugar. 2. Turpentine. n.

(-saṃ) Milk. E. payas milk or water, aff. aṇ.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Pāyasa (पायस).—i. e. payas + a, I. adj. Made of milk. Ii. m. and n. Food made of milk, [Mānavadharmaśāstra] 3, 271.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Pāyasa (पायस).—[adjective] prepared with milk; [masculine] [neuter] such a food, [especially] rice boiled in milk.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Payasa (पयस):—[from paya] mfn. full of juice or sap, [Atharva-veda] (corrupted [from] vāyasa?)

2) [v.s. ...] n. water, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

3) Pāyasa (पायस):—mf(ī)n. ([from] payas) prepared with or made of milk, [Gṛhya-sūtra and śrauta-sūtra]

4) m. n. food prepared with m°, ([especially]) rice boiled in m° or an oblation of m° and rice and sugar, [ib.; Manu-smṛti; Mahābhārata] etc.

5) m. the resin of Pinus Longifolia, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Payasa (पयस):—(saṃ) 1. n. Idem.

2) Pāyasa (पायस):—[(saḥ-saṃ)] 1. m. n. An oblation of milk, rice and sugar; turpentine. a. Made of milk or water.

[Sanskrit to German] (Deutsch Wörterbuch)

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Böhtlingk and Roth Grosses Petersburger Wörterbuch

Payasa (पयस):—(von payas) adj. wäre etwa von Saft strotzend: di.yaṃ supa.ṇaṃ paya.aṃ bṛ.antam [Atharvavedasaṃhitā 4, 14, 6. 7, 39, 1]; es ist aber eher Entstellung aus vāyasa zu vermuthen nach [Ṛgveda 1, 164, 52.] Nach [ŚABDĀRTHAK.] bei [Wilson’s Wörterbuch] n. Wasser und Milch.

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Pāyasa (पायस):—(von payas)

1) adj. mit Milch zubereitet [Kauśika’s Sūtra zum Atuarvaveda 92.] caru [GOBH. 3, 6, 9. 7, 18.] [Śāṅkhāyana’s Gṛhyasūtrāṇi 3, 13.] —

2) m. n. a) Milchspeise, insbes. in Milch gekochter Reis [Amarakoṣa 2, 7, 23.] [Hemacandra’s Abhidhānacintāmaṇi 406.] [Anekārthasaṃgraha 3, 751.] [Medinīkoṣa s. 27.] [Halāyudha 2, 165.] [GOBH. 4, 7, 19.] [ĀŚV. GṚHY. 2, 3. 4.] [PĀR.] [GṚHY. 2, 15. 3, 9.] [Manu’s Gesetzbuch 3, 271. 274. 5, 7.] [Yājñavalkya’s Gesetzbuch 1, 173.] [Mahābhārata 2, 19. 97. 12, 7054.] [Harivaṃśa 16109. 16111] (n.). [Rāmāyaṇa 1, 15, 18. 2, 91, 40.] [Suśruta 1, 70, 7. 74, 11. 229, 16. 237, 8.] kṛśarāveśavārapāyasairvā svedayet [2, 42, 4. 59, 12.] śavāvarīpāyasa eva kevalastathākṛto vāmalakeṣu pāyasaḥ [342, 18. 459, 1.] [Varāhamihira’s Bṛhajjātaka S. 42, 11. 38. 45, 32. 47, 36. 97, 19.] [Spr. 1672.] — b) das Harz der Pinus longifolia [Amarakoṣa 2, 6, 3, 30.] [Hemacandra’s Abhidhānacintāmaṇi 648.] [Hemacandra’s Anekārthasaṃgraha] [Medinīkoṣa]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Sanskrit-Wörterbuch in kürzerer Fassung

Payasa (पयस):——

1) etwa von Saft strotzend [Atharvaveda] wahrscheinlich nur Entstellung aus vāyasa

2) *n. Wasser.

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Pāyasa (पायस):——

1) Adj. mit Milch zubereitet.

2) m. n. — a) Milchspeise , insbes. in Milch gekochter Reis. — b) *das Harz der Pinus longifolia.

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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