Pavaka, Pāvaka, Pavākā: 16 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Pavaka means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit, Buddhism, Pali, the history of ancient India, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: Wisdom Library: Varāha-purāṇa

1) Pāvaka (पावक) is another name for Mānasa, one of the seven major mountains in Krauñcadvīpa, according to the Varāhapurāṇa chapter 88. All of these mountains are tall and filled with gems. Krauñcadvīpa is one of the seven islands (dvīpa), ruled over by Jyotiṣmān, one of the ten sons of Priyavrata.

2) Pāvaka (पावक).—One of the seven regions situated in Krauñcadvīpa, according to the Varāhapurāṇa chapter 88. It is also known by the name Sudarśana. Krauñcadvīpa is one of the seven islands (dvīpa), ruled over by Jyotiṣmān, one of the ten sons of Priyavrata.

Priyavrata is the son of Svāyambhuva Manu, who was created by Brahmā, who was in turn created by Nārāyaṇa, the unknowable all-pervasive primordial being.

The Varāhapurāṇa is categorised as a Mahāpurāṇa, and was originally composed of 24,000 metrical verses, possibly originating from before the 10th century. It is composed of two parts and Sūta is the main narrator.

Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopedia

Pāvaka (पावक).—A son of Agni. Agni got of his wife Svāhā three sons, Pāvaka, Pavamāna and Śuci. These three brilliant sons got together 45 sons and they were also called Agnis. Thus there were 49 Agnis made up of the father, his three sons and their 45 sons. Pāvaka had another name also—Mahān (Chapter 219, Vana Parva).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

1a) Pāvaka (पावक).—(Agni) a son of Svāhā;1 as husband of Gangā;2 Lord of Vasus;3 also known as Vaidyuta.4

  • 1) Bhāgavata-purāṇa IV. I. 60; Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa III. 8. 5; Vāyu-purāṇa 53. 97, 30; Viṣṇu-purāṇa I. 9, 63; 10. 15.
  • 2) Vāyu-purāṇa 2. 17.
  • 3) Ib. 70. 5; Viṣṇu-purāṇa I. 22. 3.
  • 4) Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa I. 2. 17; II. 12 2 and 33.

1b) A son of Vijitāśva and an Agni in previous birth born thus through Vasiṣṭha's curse.*

  • * Bhāgavata-purāṇa IV. 24. 4.

1c) An elephant.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa III. 7. 332; Vāyu-purāṇa 69. 216.
Source: Shodhganga: The saurapurana - a critical study

Pāvaka (पावक) refers to one of the three sons of Agni and Svāhā: one of the twenty-four daughters of Dakṣa and Prasūti, according to the Vaṃśa (‘genealogical description’) of the 10th century Saurapurāṇa: one of the various Upapurāṇas depicting Śaivism.—Accordingly, Ākūti was married to Ruci and Prasūti to Dakṣa. Dakṣa produced in Prasūti twenty-four daughters. [...] [Svāhā was given to Agni.] Agni and Svāhā had three sons—Pāvaka, Pavamāna and Vaidyuta-Pāvaka.

Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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General definition (in Hinduism)

Source: Wisdom Library: Hinduism

Pāvaka (पावक, “purifier”):—One of the three sons of Agni and his first wife Svāhā. Agni is one of the most important Vedic gods and represents divine illumination.

In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

Source: archive.org: Trisastisalakapurusacaritra

Pavaka (पवक) and Pavakapati are the two Indras (i.e., lords or kings) of the Pāvakas who came to the peak of Meru for partaking in the birth-ceremonies of Ṛṣabha, according to chapter 1.2 [ādīśvara-caritra] of Hemacandra’s 11th century Triṣaṣṭiśalākāpuruṣacaritra (“lives of the 63 illustrious persons”): a Sanskrit epic poem narrating the history and legends of sixty-three important persons in Jainism.

General definition book cover
context information

Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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India history and geogprahy

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary

Pāvaka.—(IE 7-1-2), ‘three’. Note: pāvaka is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

India history book cover
context information

The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

pāvaka : (m.) fire.

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Pāvaka, (adj. n.) (fr. pu, Vedic pāvaka) 1. (adj.) pure, bright, clear, shining J. V, 419.—2. (m.) the fire S. I, 69; A. IV, 97; Dh. 71, 140; J. IV, 26; V, 63 (=kaṇha-vattanin) VI, 236 (=aggi C.); Pv. I, 85; Vism. 170 (=aggi). (Page 455)

Pali book cover
context information

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

pāvaka (पावक).—m S (The purifier.) Fire.

--- OR ---

pāvakā (पावका).—m (pāya) A step or round (of a ladder &c.): a notch or hole for the foot (to ascend a Cocoanut or other Palm, descend into a well &c.)

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

pāvaka (पावक).—m Fire.

--- OR ---

pāvakā (पावका).—m A step. A notch for the foot. A quarter or one-fourth.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Pavākā (पवाका).—A whirl-wind, a hurricane.

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Pāvaka (पावक).—a. [pū-ṇvul] Purifying; पन्थानं पावकं हित्वा जनको मौढ्यमास्थितः (panthānaṃ pāvakaṃ hitvā janako mauḍhyamāsthitaḥ) Mb.12.18.4.

-kaḥ 1 Fire; पावकस्य महिमा स गण्यते कक्षवज्ज्ज्वलति सागरेऽपि यः (pāvakasya mahimā sa gaṇyate kakṣavajjjvalati sāgare'pi yaḥ) R.11.75;3.9;16.87.

2) Agni or the god of fire.

3) The fire of lightning.

4) The Chitraka tree.

5) The number 'three'.

6) A person purified by religious abstraction, saint, sage.

7) Good conduct or behaviour.

8) Name of Varuṇa.

-kī 1 The wife of Agni.

2) Ved. Name of Sarasvatī.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Pavākā (पवाका).—f.

(-kā) A whirlwind. E. to purify, āka Unadi aff.

--- OR ---

Pāvaka (पावक).—mfn.

(-kaḥ-kī-kaṃ) Who or what renders pure, a purifier, purificatory. m.

(-kaḥ) 1. fire, or its deified personification. 2. Social fire, one lighted in common. 3. A fire lighted on taking possession of a house. 4. A saint, a person purified by religious abstraction. 5. A tree, the wood of which is used to procure fire by attrition, (Premna, spinosa.) 6. Leadwort, (Plumbago zeylanica.) 7. Marking nut plant, (Semicarpus anacardium.) 8. A vermifuge plant. 9. A flash of lightning. 10. The number “three”: see viḍaṅga. f. (-kī) Wife of Agni. E. to purify, ṇvul aff.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Pāvaka (पावक).—i. e. pū + aka, I. adj. 1. Belonging to Agni, [Uttara Rāmacarita, 2. ed. Calc., 1862.] 142, 12. 2. Pure. Ii. m. 1. Fire, or its deified personification, [Mānavadharmaśāstra] 2, 187. 2. A kind of Ṛṣi. 3. Name of several plants.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Pāvaka (पावक).—[adjective] pure, clear, bright, shining; [masculine] fire or the god of fire.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Pavākā (पवाका):—[from pava] f. a storm, whirlwind, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

2) Pāvaka (पावक):—[from pāva] mf(ā)n. pure, clear, bright, shining, [Ṛg-veda; Vājasaneyi-saṃhitā; Atharva-veda] (said of Agni, Sūrya and other gods, of water, day and night etc.; according to native Comms. it is mostly = sodhaka, ‘cleansing, purifying’)

3) [v.s. ...] m. Name of a [particular] Agni (in the Purāṇas said to be a son of Agni Abhimānin and Svāhā or of Antardhāna and Śikhaṇḍinī), [Taittirīya-saṃhitā; Taittirīya-brāhmaṇa; Kātyāyana-śrauta-sūtra; Purāṇa]

4) [v.s. ...] m. (ifc. f(ā). ) fire or the god of fire, [Upaniṣad; Mahābhārata; Kāvya literature] etc.

5) [v.s. ...] m. Name of the number 3 (like all words for ‘fire’, because fire is of three kinds See agni), [Sūryasiddhānta]

6) [v.s. ...] a kind of Ṛṣi, a saint, a person purified by religious abstraction or one who purified from sin, [Mahābhārata]

7) [v.s. ...] Prenina Spinosa, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

8) [v.s. ...] Plumbago Zeylanica or some other species, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

9) [v.s. ...] Semecarpus Anacardium, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

10) [v.s. ...] Carthamus Tinctoria, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

11) [v.s. ...] Embelia Ribes, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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